Amazon cover image
Image from Amazon.com

Stability and Divergence in Language Contact : Factors and Mechanisms.

By: Contributor(s): Series: Studies in Language VariationPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (304 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027269553
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stability and Divergence in Language Contact : Factors and MechanismsDDC classification:
  • 306.44
LOC classification:
  • P130.5 -- .S69 2014eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Stability and Divergence in Language Contact -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- Part I: Theoretical aspects -- Part II: Empirical studies -- Stability and/or divergence vs. convergence -- Stability as a source of divergence -- Partial convergence may create stable divergence -- Stability and divergence in language contact -- Dialect stability and divergence from the standard language -- Dialect divergence -- Language divergence -- Part I. Theoretical aspects -- Linguistic stability and divergence: An extended perspective on language contact -- 1. On the role of stability and divergence in language change research -- 2. Factors and mechanisms relevant for linguistic change and stability -- 2.1 The multilingual speaker as the locus of contact -- 2.2 The role of intra- vs. extra-linguistic factors -- 2.3 Multilingual competence and the construction of equivalences -- 2.4 Motivations for language change and stability: The cognitive dimension -- 2.5 Motivations for language change and stability: Prestige and attitudes -- 2.6 Linguistic change and stability: Demographic, geographic and political factors -- 2.7 The role of standardisation and a roofing language -- 2.8 Styles and registers -- 3. Scenarios of linguistic stability and divergence -- 3.1 Instances of divergence in language contact situations -- 3.2 Examples of stability in language contact settings -- 4. Stability and divergence in language contact: Towards a classification -- 4.1 Contact-induced stability -- 4.2 Stability despite contact -- 4.3 Contact-induced divergence -- 4.4 Divergence despite contact -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Convergence vs. divergence from a diasystematic perspective -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Definition and types of convergence and divergence -- 3. Convergence vs. pro-diasystematic change.
4. Exemples: Recent Low German -- 4.1 Background -- 4.2 Formal and functional convergence -- 4.3 Functional convergence, formal con- or divergence -- 4.4 Functional convergence, formal divergence -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Part II. Empirical studies -- Stability and convergence in case marking: Low and High German -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Case marking in Low German and in Standard German -- 3. Methodology -- 3.1 Synchronic spoken corpus -- 3.2 Diachronic spoken corpus -- 4. Results -- 4.1 Synchronic spoken corpus -- 4.2 Diachronic spoken corpus -- 5. Discussion -- References -- Towards a typological classification of Judeo-Spanish: Analyzing syntax and prosody of Bulgarian judezmo -- 1. Introduction -- 2. State of the art -- 2.1 Syntactic features -- 2.1.1 Word-order in general -- 2.1.2 Stylistic fronting (SF) -- 2.1.3 Clitic Distribution -- 2.1.4 Clitic Climbing -- 2.2 Phonology -- 2.2.1 Segmental phonology -- 2.2.2 Speech rhythm -- 3. Data and methodology -- 3.1 Speakers -- 3.2 Grammaticality Judgment Task (GJT) -- 3.3 Speech data -- 4. Results -- 4.1 Syntax -- 4.2 Vowel reduction and speech rhythm -- 5. Summary and concluding remarks -- References -- Appendix -- Despite or because of intensive contact? Internal, external and extralinguistic aspects of divergence in modern dialects and ethnolects of Dutch -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Some key notions -- 3. A two-pronged hypothesis and a methodological preliminary -- 4. Dialect leveling in Limburg -- 5. r-lessness in three groups of Dutch dialects -- 6. Homogenization of the dialect landscape and the effect of the Dutch-Belgian state border -- 7. Two dimensions of ethnolectal variation in the realization of /z/ -- 8. Sizing up and looking ahead -- References -- Stability in Chinese and Malay heritage languages as a source of divergence -- 1. Introduction.
2. Stability in form: Contact-induced hyperextension of form -- 2.1 Indeterminate form meaning-mapping -- 2.2 A case study: Hyperextension of ada in heritage Malay -- 2.3 Congruent lexicalization: Hyperextension of the definite marker -nya in heritage Malay -- 3. Stability in function: Sortal classifiers following numerals -- 3.1 The nature of sortal classifiers -- 4. Stability in form and function -- 4.1 Grammaticalization of punya in Ambon Malay -- 4.2 Grammaticalization of punya: Baseline versus heritage speakers -- 4.3 Discussion on the halt of grammaticalization of punya in heritage Malay -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Does convergence generate stability? The case of the Cypriot Greek koiné -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What's in a koiné? Sociolinguistic and structural considerations -- 3. A composite matrix language, code-mixing at the (stable) end-state? -- 3.1 Convergence through congruence? -- 3.2 Convergence as abstract compositeness in the face of surface incongruence -- 3.2.1 Irrealis forms -- 3.2.2 Focus and wh- clefts -- 3.2.3 Innovative Present Perfect A -- 3.2.4 Arrested' convergence -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- Gender and noun inflection: The fate of 'vulnerable' categories in Northern Norwegian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The contact situation in Nord-Troms and Finnmark -- 3. Gender, inflection and language contact -- 3.1 Definition of gender and inflection class -- 3.2 The function of gender -- 3.3 Gender and contact -- 3.4 Gender and noun inflection in Manndalen and Sappen -- 4. The Nordic Dialect Corpus - methodological considerations -- 4.1 The Nordic Dialect Corpus and our corpus -- 4.2 A two-step search process -- 5. Analysis -- 5.1 Gender: Indefinite articles and possessives -- 5.2 Noun inflection -- 5.3 Summary of distributional patterns -- 6. Discussion -- 6.1 Stability -- 6.2 Divergence -- 7. Conclusion.
References -- Dialect stability and divergence in southern Spain: Social and personal motivations -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Dialect attrition and revitalization in southern Spain -- 1.2 Objective -- 2. Sociolinguistic configuration of the speech community -- 2.1 Dialect attrition. Lexical evidence -- 2.2 Horizontal divergence -- 2.2.1 Western varieties -- 2.2.2 Eastern varieties -- 2.3 Vertical divergence -- 2.3.1 Minority speech patterns -- 2.3.2 Chain-shift changes -- 3. Motivations for non-convergence in southern dialects -- 3.1 Local loyalty -- 3.1.1 Urban working class /θs/ split rejection -- 3.1.2 Rural immigrants. Minority speech patterns -- 3.1.3 The speech community polarization -- 3.2 Individual interpretation -- 3.2.1 Group and individual -- 3.2.2 Participant analyst -- 3.2.3 Individual motivation. Identity and current norms -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- The Bergen dialect splits in two -- 1. Dialectal levelling in Bergen and Norway -- 2. Characteristics of the Bergen dialect -- 3. The area -- 4. The two projects -- 5. Main differences in 1978 -- 6. Changes over three generations -- 7. Some innovations -- 8. Changes in real time and/or age grading -- 9. Social distribution -- 10. Language attitudes in the two areas -- 11. Societal development in the two areas -- 12. Conclusion -- References -- Diachronic convergence and divergence in differential object marking between Spanish and Portuguese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General aspects of differential object marking (DOM) -- 3. Some observations concerning the data -- 4. The diachrony of DOM in Spanish and Portuguese -- 4.1 The origin of DOM on the Iberian Peninsula -- 4.2 The Middle Ages (12th to 15th c.) -- 4.2.1 DOM in Medieval Spanish -- 4.2.2 DOM in Medieval Portuguese -- 4.3 Spanish DOM from the 16th to the 21st c.
4.4 Portuguese DOM during the Spanish Golden Age (16th and 17th c.) -- 4.5 Portuguese DOM from the 18th to the 21st c. -- 4.6 Comparison of Spanish and Portuguese DOM -- 5. Convergence and divergence of Portuguese DOM -- 6. Conclusion -- Abbreviations used in the glosses -- References -- Persons index -- Subjects index.
Summary: Comparing the evolution of differential object marking (DOM) in Spanishand Portuguese between the 16th and the 20th c. we discover great differencesbetween the two neighbor languages. Whereas in Spanish we notice a steadyincrease and high degree of grammaticalization of DOM, the graph for thedegree of grammaticalization of DOM in Portuguese resembles a standardizednormal Gaussian distribution with its peak in the 17th c. The increase of objectmarking until the 17th c. is in consequence of convergence towards Spanish dueto the high prestige of the latter language. From the 18th c. onwards divergencedue to the building of an own national and linguistic identity finally led to thedisappearance of DOM in modern Portuguese.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00099934
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00099934
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Stability and Divergence in Language Contact -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- Part I: Theoretical aspects -- Part II: Empirical studies -- Stability and/or divergence vs. convergence -- Stability as a source of divergence -- Partial convergence may create stable divergence -- Stability and divergence in language contact -- Dialect stability and divergence from the standard language -- Dialect divergence -- Language divergence -- Part I. Theoretical aspects -- Linguistic stability and divergence: An extended perspective on language contact -- 1. On the role of stability and divergence in language change research -- 2. Factors and mechanisms relevant for linguistic change and stability -- 2.1 The multilingual speaker as the locus of contact -- 2.2 The role of intra- vs. extra-linguistic factors -- 2.3 Multilingual competence and the construction of equivalences -- 2.4 Motivations for language change and stability: The cognitive dimension -- 2.5 Motivations for language change and stability: Prestige and attitudes -- 2.6 Linguistic change and stability: Demographic, geographic and political factors -- 2.7 The role of standardisation and a roofing language -- 2.8 Styles and registers -- 3. Scenarios of linguistic stability and divergence -- 3.1 Instances of divergence in language contact situations -- 3.2 Examples of stability in language contact settings -- 4. Stability and divergence in language contact: Towards a classification -- 4.1 Contact-induced stability -- 4.2 Stability despite contact -- 4.3 Contact-induced divergence -- 4.4 Divergence despite contact -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Convergence vs. divergence from a diasystematic perspective -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Definition and types of convergence and divergence -- 3. Convergence vs. pro-diasystematic change.

4. Exemples: Recent Low German -- 4.1 Background -- 4.2 Formal and functional convergence -- 4.3 Functional convergence, formal con- or divergence -- 4.4 Functional convergence, formal divergence -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Part II. Empirical studies -- Stability and convergence in case marking: Low and High German -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Case marking in Low German and in Standard German -- 3. Methodology -- 3.1 Synchronic spoken corpus -- 3.2 Diachronic spoken corpus -- 4. Results -- 4.1 Synchronic spoken corpus -- 4.2 Diachronic spoken corpus -- 5. Discussion -- References -- Towards a typological classification of Judeo-Spanish: Analyzing syntax and prosody of Bulgarian judezmo -- 1. Introduction -- 2. State of the art -- 2.1 Syntactic features -- 2.1.1 Word-order in general -- 2.1.2 Stylistic fronting (SF) -- 2.1.3 Clitic Distribution -- 2.1.4 Clitic Climbing -- 2.2 Phonology -- 2.2.1 Segmental phonology -- 2.2.2 Speech rhythm -- 3. Data and methodology -- 3.1 Speakers -- 3.2 Grammaticality Judgment Task (GJT) -- 3.3 Speech data -- 4. Results -- 4.1 Syntax -- 4.2 Vowel reduction and speech rhythm -- 5. Summary and concluding remarks -- References -- Appendix -- Despite or because of intensive contact? Internal, external and extralinguistic aspects of divergence in modern dialects and ethnolects of Dutch -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Some key notions -- 3. A two-pronged hypothesis and a methodological preliminary -- 4. Dialect leveling in Limburg -- 5. r-lessness in three groups of Dutch dialects -- 6. Homogenization of the dialect landscape and the effect of the Dutch-Belgian state border -- 7. Two dimensions of ethnolectal variation in the realization of /z/ -- 8. Sizing up and looking ahead -- References -- Stability in Chinese and Malay heritage languages as a source of divergence -- 1. Introduction.

2. Stability in form: Contact-induced hyperextension of form -- 2.1 Indeterminate form meaning-mapping -- 2.2 A case study: Hyperextension of ada in heritage Malay -- 2.3 Congruent lexicalization: Hyperextension of the definite marker -nya in heritage Malay -- 3. Stability in function: Sortal classifiers following numerals -- 3.1 The nature of sortal classifiers -- 4. Stability in form and function -- 4.1 Grammaticalization of punya in Ambon Malay -- 4.2 Grammaticalization of punya: Baseline versus heritage speakers -- 4.3 Discussion on the halt of grammaticalization of punya in heritage Malay -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Does convergence generate stability? The case of the Cypriot Greek koiné -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What's in a koiné? Sociolinguistic and structural considerations -- 3. A composite matrix language, code-mixing at the (stable) end-state? -- 3.1 Convergence through congruence? -- 3.2 Convergence as abstract compositeness in the face of surface incongruence -- 3.2.1 Irrealis forms -- 3.2.2 Focus and wh- clefts -- 3.2.3 Innovative Present Perfect A -- 3.2.4 Arrested' convergence -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- Gender and noun inflection: The fate of 'vulnerable' categories in Northern Norwegian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The contact situation in Nord-Troms and Finnmark -- 3. Gender, inflection and language contact -- 3.1 Definition of gender and inflection class -- 3.2 The function of gender -- 3.3 Gender and contact -- 3.4 Gender and noun inflection in Manndalen and Sappen -- 4. The Nordic Dialect Corpus - methodological considerations -- 4.1 The Nordic Dialect Corpus and our corpus -- 4.2 A two-step search process -- 5. Analysis -- 5.1 Gender: Indefinite articles and possessives -- 5.2 Noun inflection -- 5.3 Summary of distributional patterns -- 6. Discussion -- 6.1 Stability -- 6.2 Divergence -- 7. Conclusion.

References -- Dialect stability and divergence in southern Spain: Social and personal motivations -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Dialect attrition and revitalization in southern Spain -- 1.2 Objective -- 2. Sociolinguistic configuration of the speech community -- 2.1 Dialect attrition. Lexical evidence -- 2.2 Horizontal divergence -- 2.2.1 Western varieties -- 2.2.2 Eastern varieties -- 2.3 Vertical divergence -- 2.3.1 Minority speech patterns -- 2.3.2 Chain-shift changes -- 3. Motivations for non-convergence in southern dialects -- 3.1 Local loyalty -- 3.1.1 Urban working class /θs/ split rejection -- 3.1.2 Rural immigrants. Minority speech patterns -- 3.1.3 The speech community polarization -- 3.2 Individual interpretation -- 3.2.1 Group and individual -- 3.2.2 Participant analyst -- 3.2.3 Individual motivation. Identity and current norms -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- The Bergen dialect splits in two -- 1. Dialectal levelling in Bergen and Norway -- 2. Characteristics of the Bergen dialect -- 3. The area -- 4. The two projects -- 5. Main differences in 1978 -- 6. Changes over three generations -- 7. Some innovations -- 8. Changes in real time and/or age grading -- 9. Social distribution -- 10. Language attitudes in the two areas -- 11. Societal development in the two areas -- 12. Conclusion -- References -- Diachronic convergence and divergence in differential object marking between Spanish and Portuguese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General aspects of differential object marking (DOM) -- 3. Some observations concerning the data -- 4. The diachrony of DOM in Spanish and Portuguese -- 4.1 The origin of DOM on the Iberian Peninsula -- 4.2 The Middle Ages (12th to 15th c.) -- 4.2.1 DOM in Medieval Spanish -- 4.2.2 DOM in Medieval Portuguese -- 4.3 Spanish DOM from the 16th to the 21st c.

4.4 Portuguese DOM during the Spanish Golden Age (16th and 17th c.) -- 4.5 Portuguese DOM from the 18th to the 21st c. -- 4.6 Comparison of Spanish and Portuguese DOM -- 5. Convergence and divergence of Portuguese DOM -- 6. Conclusion -- Abbreviations used in the glosses -- References -- Persons index -- Subjects index.

Comparing the evolution of differential object marking (DOM) in Spanishand Portuguese between the 16th and the 20th c. we discover great differencesbetween the two neighbor languages. Whereas in Spanish we notice a steadyincrease and high degree of grammaticalization of DOM, the graph for thedegree of grammaticalization of DOM in Portuguese resembles a standardizednormal Gaussian distribution with its peak in the 17th c. The increase of objectmarking until the 17th c. is in consequence of convergence towards Spanish dueto the high prestige of the latter language. From the 18th c. onwards divergencedue to the building of an own national and linguistic identity finally led to thedisappearance of DOM in modern Portuguese.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.