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Known Unknowns of Translation Studies.

By: Contributor(s): Series: Benjamins Current TopicsPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (188 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027269225
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Known Unknowns of Translation StudiesDDC classification:
  • 418/.02
LOC classification:
  • P306.94 -- .K66 2014eb
Online resources:
Contents:
The Known Unknowns of Translation Studies -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Translation Studies looking back and looking forward -- 1. The positioning of the discipline -- 2. Technological determinants -- 3. Interdisciplinarity and metalanguage -- 4. The translation process -- 5. Internationalization and ethics -- References -- Translation studies at a cross-roads -- References -- Quo vadis, functional translatology? -- 1. The point(s) of departure -- 2. First functional applications in Germany -- 3. Spreading the word in Germany -- 4. Functionalism outside the German-speaking area -- 5. The third and fourth generation -- 5.1 Applications to translator and interpreter training -- 5.2 Culture-specificity -- 5.3 Application of functionalism to specific text types or translation types -- 5.4 The profession -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- More spoken or more translated ? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Overcoming the hurdles: Recent developments in corpus-based interpreting studies -- 3. Two studies of modality vs. ontology -- 3.1 Study 1 (experimental data): The effects of modality -- 3.2 Study 2 (authentic data): The effects of modality vs. ontology -- 3.3 Method and findings -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- The development and current state of translation process research -- 1. Translation process studies -- 1.1 As part of descriptive translation studies -- 1.2 Early concern with processes -- 1.3 Think-aloud verbalisation -- 2. Translation process research -- 2.1 Keystroke logging -- 2.2 Tracking and reading translators' eye movements -- 2.3 Three basic assumptions of TPR -- 2.3.1 Behavioural manifestations of translational processing -- 2.3.2 When is a pause a pause, and what happens in them? -- 2.3.3 Alignment and triangulation of keystroke and gaze data.
2.4 On theoretical uses of translation process data -- 3. Concluding remarks: remaining unknowns -- References -- Une traductologie pour quelles pratiques traductionnelles? -- Translation studies for what translation practices? -- 1. Prospectives à moyen terme -- 1.1 Changements drastiques des pratiques professionnelles -- 1.2 Traduction, multimédias, technologies -- 2. Un tournant économique en traductologie? -- 3. Vers quelle traductologie? -- 3.1 Un objet à géométrie variable -- 3.2 Pertinence sociale de la recherche -- 3.3 Réflexivité nécessaire et historiographie encore à faire -- 4. Pour récapituler -- Références -- The neuroscience of translation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The neuroscience of perception -- 3. Implications for translation studies from the neuroscience of perception -- 4. The neuroscience of memory -- 5. Implications for translation studies related to the neuroscience of memory -- 6. Plasticity of the brain -- 7. Implications for translation studies related to the plasticity of the brain -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- Unknown agents in translated political discourse -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Jointly produced texts: A common voice? -- 3. Press conferences: Whose voice is heard? -- 4. Recontextualisation of political discourse in mass media across languages -- 5. Conclusion: From political texts to contexts of political institutions -- References -- Texts analysed -- The city in translation -- 1. Introduction: The translational city -- 2. Patterns of circulation: the dual city -- 3. Cities of Central Europe -- 4. Czernowitz -- 5. Culture of mediation -- 6. Literary interactions -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Name index -- Subject index.
Summary: In the spirit of the 'enlargement' of the field proposed by Tymoczko (2007), this article argues for the city as an object of translation studies. All cities are multilingual, but for some language relations have particularly intense historical and cultural significance. Translation studies can illuminate the nature and effects of these interactions. The cities of Central Europe and in particular Czernowitz offer rich case studies. A thorough investigation of translational culture between 1880 and 1939 can help to provide a nuanced understanding of the nature of literary relations which prevailed before the violence of World War II.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00099932
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00099932
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

The Known Unknowns of Translation Studies -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Translation Studies looking back and looking forward -- 1. The positioning of the discipline -- 2. Technological determinants -- 3. Interdisciplinarity and metalanguage -- 4. The translation process -- 5. Internationalization and ethics -- References -- Translation studies at a cross-roads -- References -- Quo vadis, functional translatology? -- 1. The point(s) of departure -- 2. First functional applications in Germany -- 3. Spreading the word in Germany -- 4. Functionalism outside the German-speaking area -- 5. The third and fourth generation -- 5.1 Applications to translator and interpreter training -- 5.2 Culture-specificity -- 5.3 Application of functionalism to specific text types or translation types -- 5.4 The profession -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- More spoken or more translated ? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Overcoming the hurdles: Recent developments in corpus-based interpreting studies -- 3. Two studies of modality vs. ontology -- 3.1 Study 1 (experimental data): The effects of modality -- 3.2 Study 2 (authentic data): The effects of modality vs. ontology -- 3.3 Method and findings -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- The development and current state of translation process research -- 1. Translation process studies -- 1.1 As part of descriptive translation studies -- 1.2 Early concern with processes -- 1.3 Think-aloud verbalisation -- 2. Translation process research -- 2.1 Keystroke logging -- 2.2 Tracking and reading translators' eye movements -- 2.3 Three basic assumptions of TPR -- 2.3.1 Behavioural manifestations of translational processing -- 2.3.2 When is a pause a pause, and what happens in them? -- 2.3.3 Alignment and triangulation of keystroke and gaze data.

2.4 On theoretical uses of translation process data -- 3. Concluding remarks: remaining unknowns -- References -- Une traductologie pour quelles pratiques traductionnelles? -- Translation studies for what translation practices? -- 1. Prospectives à moyen terme -- 1.1 Changements drastiques des pratiques professionnelles -- 1.2 Traduction, multimédias, technologies -- 2. Un tournant économique en traductologie? -- 3. Vers quelle traductologie? -- 3.1 Un objet à géométrie variable -- 3.2 Pertinence sociale de la recherche -- 3.3 Réflexivité nécessaire et historiographie encore à faire -- 4. Pour récapituler -- Références -- The neuroscience of translation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The neuroscience of perception -- 3. Implications for translation studies from the neuroscience of perception -- 4. The neuroscience of memory -- 5. Implications for translation studies related to the neuroscience of memory -- 6. Plasticity of the brain -- 7. Implications for translation studies related to the plasticity of the brain -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- Unknown agents in translated political discourse -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Jointly produced texts: A common voice? -- 3. Press conferences: Whose voice is heard? -- 4. Recontextualisation of political discourse in mass media across languages -- 5. Conclusion: From political texts to contexts of political institutions -- References -- Texts analysed -- The city in translation -- 1. Introduction: The translational city -- 2. Patterns of circulation: the dual city -- 3. Cities of Central Europe -- 4. Czernowitz -- 5. Culture of mediation -- 6. Literary interactions -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Name index -- Subject index.

In the spirit of the 'enlargement' of the field proposed by Tymoczko (2007), this article argues for the city as an object of translation studies. All cities are multilingual, but for some language relations have particularly intense historical and cultural significance. Translation studies can illuminate the nature and effects of these interactions. The cities of Central Europe and in particular Czernowitz offer rich case studies. A thorough investigation of translational culture between 1880 and 1939 can help to provide a nuanced understanding of the nature of literary relations which prevailed before the violence of World War II.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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