The Verb and the Paragraph in Biblical Hebrew : A Cognitive Linguistic Approach.

By: Robar, ElizabethSeries: Studies in Semitic Languages and Linguistics SerPublisher: Leiden : BRILL, 2014Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (232 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789004283114Subject(s): Bible. -- Old Testament -- Language, style.;Bible -- Language, style.;Hebrew language -- Verb.;Hebrew language -- Paragraphs.;Cognitive grammarGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Verb and the Paragraph in Biblical Hebrew : A Cognitive Linguistic ApproachDDC classification: 492.4/56 LOC classification: PJ4645.R63 2014+Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Table of Figures -- Chapter 1 A Foundation in Cognitive Linguistics -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Cognitive Organization: Coherence and Prominence -- 1.2.1 The Search for Coherence: Gestalt Psychology -- 1.2.1.1 Gestalt Effect -- 1.2.1.2 Zeigarnik Effect -- 1.2.1.3 Figure and Ground -- 1.2.2 The Location of Prominence: Consciousness -- 1.2.2.1 Active Consciousness -- 1.2.2.2 Semi-Active Consciousness -- 1.2.2.3 Inactive Consciousness -- 1.2.2.4 Memory -- 1.2.3 Determining Prominence: Attention -- 1.2.3.1 Alertness -- 1.2.3.2 Orientation -- 1.2.3.3 Detection -- 1.2.3.4 Attention and Consciousness -- 1.2.4 Managing Prominence: Chunking -- 1.2.4.1 Consolidation -- 1.2.4.2 Entrenchment -- 1.2.4.3 Schemas -- 1.2.4.4 Coherence -- 1.2.5 Summary -- 1.3 Mapping Cognition to Language -- 1.3.1 Active Consciousness: The Clause -- 1.3.2 Attentional Detection at Beginning: Topic -- 1.3.2.1 Literature on Topic -- 1.3.2.2 Topic as Conceptual Starting Point -- 1.3.3 Attentional Detection at End: Focus -- 1.3.3.1 Literature on Focus -- 1.3.3.2 Focus as Conceptual Endpoint -- 1.3.4 Semi-Active Consciousness: The Paragraph -- 1.4 Linguistic Organization: Coherence and Prominence in Discourse -- 1.4.1 Discourse Units -- 1.4.1.1 Mental Space and Discourse Space -- 1.4.1.2 Schematic Steps -- 1.4.1.3 Written Language -- 1.4.2 Delimiting Units -- 1.4.2.1 Indicating Discontinuity -- 1.4.2.2 Themes and Genres -- 1.4.2.3 Indicating Continuity -- 1.4.3 Integrating Units -- 1.4.3.1 Theme Definition: Point of Conceptual Integration -- 1.4.3.2 Theme Construction -- 1.5 Linguistic Encoding: Coherence vs. Prominence -- 1.5.1 Winning Motivation: Markedness -- 1.5.1.1 Binary Oppositions -- 1.5.1.2 Determining Markedness -- 1.5.1.3 Purpose: Economy -- 1.5.1.4 Markedness Shift and Reversal -- 1.5.2 Changing Motivation: Grammaticalization.
1.5.2.1 Subjectification -- 1.5.2.2 Universal Paths of Evolution -- Chapter 2 Schematic Continuity -- 2.1 The Paragraph in Biblical Hebrew: Background -- 2.1.1 Formed by Chains -- 2.1.2 Split into Foreground and Background -- 2.1.2.1 Foreground of the Foreground -- 2.1.3 Split by Discourse Types (Narrative/Speech) or Text Types -- 2.1.4 Reflection of a Cognitive Unit -- 2.1.4.1 Schematic Steps -- 2.1.4.2 Schematic Continuity -- 2.1.5 Marked Partly Formally, Partly Conceptually -- 2.2 Wayyiqtol -- 2.2.1 Comparative-Historical Scholarship -- 2.2.1.1 Morphology -- 2.2.1.2 Semantics -- 2.2.2 Alternative Frameworks: Typology and Grammaticalization -- 2.2.2.1 Semitic Verbal Evolution and Grammaticalization -- 2.2.3 The Motivation for Grammaticalization -- 2.2.3.1 Syntactic Restrictions -- 2.2.3.2 Another Typological Parallel: Consecutive Forms -- 2.2.3.3 Semantics and Pragmatics of Consecutive Forms -- 2.2.4 Schematic Continuity: Examples -- 2.2.4.1 Schematic Continuity in Narrative -- 2.2.4.2 Schematic Continuity in Poetry -- 2.2.4.3 Schematic Continuity in Translation -- 2.2.4.4 Schematic Continuity and Discontinuity -- 2.2.4.5 Schematic Continuity and Markedness -- 2.3 Wəqatal -- 2.3.1 Scholarship -- 2.3.1.1 Modal/Future in Conditional Apodoses -- 2.3.1.2 Analogy with wayyiqtol -- 2.3.1.3 Atypical Uses -- 2.3.2 Syntax and Semantics -- 2.3.2.1 Continuing Verbal Semantics -- 2.3.2.2 Initiating Verbal Semantics -- 2.3.2.3 Initiating Purpose/Result Modality -- 2.3.2.4 Clause-Medial Position -- 2.3.3 Compared to wayyiqtol -- 2.3.4 Conclusion -- 2.4 Wəyiqtol -- 2.4.1 Semantics and Syntax -- 2.4.1.1 Following yiqtol (Same Reference) -- 2.4.1.2 Following Jussive/Cohortative (Same Reference) -- 2.4.1.3 Switch Reference -- 2.4.1.4 Parallel Reference -- 2.4.2 Compared to wəqatal and Other Forms -- 2.4.3 Summary -- 2.5 Poetry: Psalm 18 -- 2.6 Conclusion.
Chapter 3 Schematic Discontinuity -- 3.1 On Discontinuity -- 3.1.1 Text Typologies -- 3.1.2 Foreground/Background -- 3.1.3 Theme -- 3.2 Familiar Forms with Unexpected Functions -- 3.2.1 Wə+qatal as a Past Perfective -- 3.2.2 Alternative Interpretations -- 3.2.3 Summary -- 3.3 Unexpected Forms: Paragogics -- 3.3.1 Distribution of Paragogic Suffixes -- 3.3.2 Scholarship -- 3.3.2.1 Paragogic nun (yiqtol) -- 3.3.2.2 Paragogic he (wayyiqtol and imperative) -- 3.3.3 Proposed Categories -- 3.3.3.1 Ventive -- 3.3.3.2 Directive/Andative -- 3.3.3.3 Aspectual (Imperfective) -- 3.3.3.4 Modal -- 3.3.3.5 Topic-Shift Markers -- 3.3.3.6 Thematic Marker -- 3.3.4 Examples of Thematic Markers -- 3.3.4.1 Genesis 3:1-7 -- 3.3.4.2 Deuteronomy 1 -- 3.3.4.3 Genesis 18 -- 3.3.4.4 Samuel-Kings -- 3.3.4.5 Job -- 3.3.4.6 Summary -- 3.3.5 Grammaticalization -- 3.3.5.1 'Come' > Ventive, Future -- 3.3.5.2 Ventive > Dative -- 3.3.5.3 Structuring Discourse -- 3.3.5.4 Prominence -- 3.3.5.5 Early Grammaticalization -- 3.3.5.6 Summary -- 3.3.6 Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Conclusion -- 4.1 Discourse Patterns and Functions for Continuity -- 4.2 Discourse Patterns for Thematicity (Discontinuity) -- 4.3 Continuity and Discontinuity Illustrated: 1 Sam. 1:1-7 -- 4.4 Possible Implications for Semitic Studies -- Bibliography -- Author Index -- Biblical Reference Index -- Subject Index.
Summary: In this book, Elizabeth Robar demonstrates how biblical Hebrew verbal patterns can reveal paragraph structure and themes.
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Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Table of Figures -- Chapter 1 A Foundation in Cognitive Linguistics -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Cognitive Organization: Coherence and Prominence -- 1.2.1 The Search for Coherence: Gestalt Psychology -- 1.2.1.1 Gestalt Effect -- 1.2.1.2 Zeigarnik Effect -- 1.2.1.3 Figure and Ground -- 1.2.2 The Location of Prominence: Consciousness -- 1.2.2.1 Active Consciousness -- 1.2.2.2 Semi-Active Consciousness -- 1.2.2.3 Inactive Consciousness -- 1.2.2.4 Memory -- 1.2.3 Determining Prominence: Attention -- 1.2.3.1 Alertness -- 1.2.3.2 Orientation -- 1.2.3.3 Detection -- 1.2.3.4 Attention and Consciousness -- 1.2.4 Managing Prominence: Chunking -- 1.2.4.1 Consolidation -- 1.2.4.2 Entrenchment -- 1.2.4.3 Schemas -- 1.2.4.4 Coherence -- 1.2.5 Summary -- 1.3 Mapping Cognition to Language -- 1.3.1 Active Consciousness: The Clause -- 1.3.2 Attentional Detection at Beginning: Topic -- 1.3.2.1 Literature on Topic -- 1.3.2.2 Topic as Conceptual Starting Point -- 1.3.3 Attentional Detection at End: Focus -- 1.3.3.1 Literature on Focus -- 1.3.3.2 Focus as Conceptual Endpoint -- 1.3.4 Semi-Active Consciousness: The Paragraph -- 1.4 Linguistic Organization: Coherence and Prominence in Discourse -- 1.4.1 Discourse Units -- 1.4.1.1 Mental Space and Discourse Space -- 1.4.1.2 Schematic Steps -- 1.4.1.3 Written Language -- 1.4.2 Delimiting Units -- 1.4.2.1 Indicating Discontinuity -- 1.4.2.2 Themes and Genres -- 1.4.2.3 Indicating Continuity -- 1.4.3 Integrating Units -- 1.4.3.1 Theme Definition: Point of Conceptual Integration -- 1.4.3.2 Theme Construction -- 1.5 Linguistic Encoding: Coherence vs. Prominence -- 1.5.1 Winning Motivation: Markedness -- 1.5.1.1 Binary Oppositions -- 1.5.1.2 Determining Markedness -- 1.5.1.3 Purpose: Economy -- 1.5.1.4 Markedness Shift and Reversal -- 1.5.2 Changing Motivation: Grammaticalization.

1.5.2.1 Subjectification -- 1.5.2.2 Universal Paths of Evolution -- Chapter 2 Schematic Continuity -- 2.1 The Paragraph in Biblical Hebrew: Background -- 2.1.1 Formed by Chains -- 2.1.2 Split into Foreground and Background -- 2.1.2.1 Foreground of the Foreground -- 2.1.3 Split by Discourse Types (Narrative/Speech) or Text Types -- 2.1.4 Reflection of a Cognitive Unit -- 2.1.4.1 Schematic Steps -- 2.1.4.2 Schematic Continuity -- 2.1.5 Marked Partly Formally, Partly Conceptually -- 2.2 Wayyiqtol -- 2.2.1 Comparative-Historical Scholarship -- 2.2.1.1 Morphology -- 2.2.1.2 Semantics -- 2.2.2 Alternative Frameworks: Typology and Grammaticalization -- 2.2.2.1 Semitic Verbal Evolution and Grammaticalization -- 2.2.3 The Motivation for Grammaticalization -- 2.2.3.1 Syntactic Restrictions -- 2.2.3.2 Another Typological Parallel: Consecutive Forms -- 2.2.3.3 Semantics and Pragmatics of Consecutive Forms -- 2.2.4 Schematic Continuity: Examples -- 2.2.4.1 Schematic Continuity in Narrative -- 2.2.4.2 Schematic Continuity in Poetry -- 2.2.4.3 Schematic Continuity in Translation -- 2.2.4.4 Schematic Continuity and Discontinuity -- 2.2.4.5 Schematic Continuity and Markedness -- 2.3 Wəqatal -- 2.3.1 Scholarship -- 2.3.1.1 Modal/Future in Conditional Apodoses -- 2.3.1.2 Analogy with wayyiqtol -- 2.3.1.3 Atypical Uses -- 2.3.2 Syntax and Semantics -- 2.3.2.1 Continuing Verbal Semantics -- 2.3.2.2 Initiating Verbal Semantics -- 2.3.2.3 Initiating Purpose/Result Modality -- 2.3.2.4 Clause-Medial Position -- 2.3.3 Compared to wayyiqtol -- 2.3.4 Conclusion -- 2.4 Wəyiqtol -- 2.4.1 Semantics and Syntax -- 2.4.1.1 Following yiqtol (Same Reference) -- 2.4.1.2 Following Jussive/Cohortative (Same Reference) -- 2.4.1.3 Switch Reference -- 2.4.1.4 Parallel Reference -- 2.4.2 Compared to wəqatal and Other Forms -- 2.4.3 Summary -- 2.5 Poetry: Psalm 18 -- 2.6 Conclusion.

Chapter 3 Schematic Discontinuity -- 3.1 On Discontinuity -- 3.1.1 Text Typologies -- 3.1.2 Foreground/Background -- 3.1.3 Theme -- 3.2 Familiar Forms with Unexpected Functions -- 3.2.1 Wə+qatal as a Past Perfective -- 3.2.2 Alternative Interpretations -- 3.2.3 Summary -- 3.3 Unexpected Forms: Paragogics -- 3.3.1 Distribution of Paragogic Suffixes -- 3.3.2 Scholarship -- 3.3.2.1 Paragogic nun (yiqtol) -- 3.3.2.2 Paragogic he (wayyiqtol and imperative) -- 3.3.3 Proposed Categories -- 3.3.3.1 Ventive -- 3.3.3.2 Directive/Andative -- 3.3.3.3 Aspectual (Imperfective) -- 3.3.3.4 Modal -- 3.3.3.5 Topic-Shift Markers -- 3.3.3.6 Thematic Marker -- 3.3.4 Examples of Thematic Markers -- 3.3.4.1 Genesis 3:1-7 -- 3.3.4.2 Deuteronomy 1 -- 3.3.4.3 Genesis 18 -- 3.3.4.4 Samuel-Kings -- 3.3.4.5 Job -- 3.3.4.6 Summary -- 3.3.5 Grammaticalization -- 3.3.5.1 'Come' > Ventive, Future -- 3.3.5.2 Ventive > Dative -- 3.3.5.3 Structuring Discourse -- 3.3.5.4 Prominence -- 3.3.5.5 Early Grammaticalization -- 3.3.5.6 Summary -- 3.3.6 Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Conclusion -- 4.1 Discourse Patterns and Functions for Continuity -- 4.2 Discourse Patterns for Thematicity (Discontinuity) -- 4.3 Continuity and Discontinuity Illustrated: 1 Sam. 1:1-7 -- 4.4 Possible Implications for Semitic Studies -- Bibliography -- Author Index -- Biblical Reference Index -- Subject Index.

In this book, Elizabeth Robar demonstrates how biblical Hebrew verbal patterns can reveal paragraph structure and themes.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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