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Dungeons and Dragons and Philosophy : Read and Gain Advantage on All Wisdom Checks.

By: Contributor(s): Series: The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture SerPublisher: Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (241 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781118921159
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Dungeons and Dragons and Philosophy : Read and Gain Advantage on All Wisdom ChecksDDC classification:
  • 794.8
LOC classification:
  • GV1469.62.D84 -- .D84 2014eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- The Blackwell Philosophy and PopCulture Series -- Dungeons & Dragons and Philosophy: Read and Gain Advantage on all Wisdom Checks -- Copyright -- Contents -- Abbreviations Used in the Text -- Introduction A Game Like No Other -- Part I Lawful Good vs. Chaotic Evil -- 1 Sympathy for the Devils: Free Will and Dungeons & Dragons -- Pity the Pit Fiend -- Damnation Without a Saving Throw -- Free Will in the Lair of the Succubus -- How Thorin Axebeard Randomly Defended the Bridge -- Four-Dimensional Dungeons and Powerless Dragons -- Free Will and Other Imaginary Monsters -- Notes -- 2 Paragons and Knaves: Does Good Character Make for a Good Character? -- The Good, the Bad, and the Legendary -- Taking Alignment Seriously -- Paladins and Trolleys -- The Ring of Gyges and the Arch-Lich -- Note -- 3 Is Anyone Actually Chaotic Evil?: A Playable Theory of Willful Wrongdoing -- No Dice -- Socrates, the First DM -- Aristotle - Unearthed Arcana -- Thomas Aquinas - 15th-Level Cleric -- Monster Immanuel -- Dietrich von Hildebrand - Third Edition Rules -- Hannah Arendt and the Campaign of Evil -- End of Round -- Notes -- Part II So Did You Win? Philosophy and D&D Gameplay -- 4 Save vs. Death: Some Reflections on the Lifecycle of PCs -- Death Be Not Proud -- Phaedo and Confronting the Reaper -- The Graveyard of Dead PCs -- Ability Scores: The Natural Lottery -- Notes -- 5 To My Other Self: Reflection and Existentialism in Dungeons & Dragons -- The Actor, the Author, and the Other -- In Word and Deed -- Mirror and Illusion -- Experience without EXP -- Notes -- 6 Player-Character Is What You Are in the Dark: The Phenomenology of Immersion in Dungeons & Dragons -- The Idea of Immersion Leads to Phenomenology -- What Is Phenomenology? -- Seeing Is Believing: Immersion as Visualization -- Am I My Character? Immersion and Identification.
Alea and Immersion: The Role of the Dice -- For Tyros and Grognards -- Notes -- Part III Crafting Worlds -- 7 Imagination and Creation: The Morality of Fiction in Dungeons & Dragons -- The Traditionalists (aka the "Lawful Good") -- D&D Rules! -- Lost in the Labyrinth? -- The Postmodernists (aka "Chaotic" and beyond Good and Evil...) -- A New Quest -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- 8 Dungeonmastery as Soulcraft -- The Essence of Fantasy -- The Magic of Morality -- The Consolation of Fantasy -- Worldbuilding as Moral Expression -- Missed Opportunities -- Notes -- Part IV Foray into The Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance -- 9 Menzoberranzan: A Perfect Unjust State -- The Myth of Gyges -- "Creatures of survival, not of principle" -- "I forgive your foolish thoughts … this time!" -- "What do you see that the rest of us cannot?" -- "His companions…viewed their surroundings through tainted eyes" -- "How I wish that one had learned his place, his values" -- Notes -- 10 Who Is Raistlin Majere? -- The Question and the Test -- Three Robes, Three Answers -- Taking the Test -- The Master of Past and Present -- Appendix : Tales of Raistlin -- Notes -- Part V The Ethics of Spellcasting -- 11 Expediency and Expendability: An Exhumation of the Morality of Necromancy -- From Killing to Kant: Exploring the [Evil] Descriptor -- The Ghost in the Machine: The Dualism of Dungeons & Dragons8 -- The [Evil]ness of the Undead: Euthyphro Revisited -- Necromancy for Fun and Profit: Some Examples Evaluated -- Hobbes, Machiavelli, and a Necromancer Walk into a Bar… -- Walk like an Egyptian: Necromancy as Taboo and a "Possible World" Argument -- Hug a Zombie: Recognizing and Moving Beyond Our Cultural Prejudice -- Notes -- 12 By Friendship or Force: Is it Ethical to Summon Animals to Fight by Your Side in Dungeons & Dragons? -- Mages and the Ethics of Summoning.
Wizards and the Ethics of Familiars -- Animal Ethics and Character Alignment -- Druids and the Ethics of Summoning Animals -- Trouble in the Druid Grove -- Notes -- Part VI Dungeons & Dragons Out in the Real World -- 13 "Kill her, kill her! Oh God, I'm sorry!": Spectating Dungeons & Dragons -- "Sixteen Diamonds' Worth of Dirt": Television and Dungeons & Dragons -- Legacies -- "Don't blow the Daily" Learning 2 Play -- Notes -- 14 Berserker in a Skirt: Sex and Gender in Dungeons & Dragons -- Sex and Gender -- Gender Games -- Fantasy and Imagination as Vehicles for Social Change -- Berserker in a Skirt -- Liberation and Laughter -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- 15 "Others play at dice"1: Friendship and Dungeons & Dragons -- WANTED -- WANTED -- "Someone pass the Mountain Dew" -- The Crusty Dagger: Food and Ale -- "The friendship of those who are good then, is friendship most of all" -- "I'm glad you're with me now at the end of all things" -- Notes -- Contributors -- Index.
Summary: Do demons and devils have free will? Does justice exist in Menzoberranzan? What's the morality involved with player characters casting necromancy and summoning spells? Dungeons & Dragons and Philosophy probes the rich terrain of philosophically compelling concepts and ideas that underlie Dungeons & Dragons, the legendary fantasy role-playing game that grew into a world-wide cultural phenomenon. A series of accessible essays reveals what the imaginary worlds of D&D can teach us about ethics, morality, metaphysics and more. Illustrates a wide variety of philosophical concepts and ideas that arise in Dungeons & Dragons gameplay and presents them in an accessible and entertaining manner Reveals how the strategies, tactics, improvisations, and role-play employed by D&D enthusiasts have startling parallels in the real world of philosophy Explores a wide range of philosophical topics, including the nature of free will, the metaphysics of personal identity, the morality of crafting fictions, sex and gender issues in tabletop gameplay, and friendship and collaborative storytelling Provides gamers with deep philosophical insights that can lead to a richer appreciation of D&D and any gaming experience.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00096026
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Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00096026
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Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Cover -- The Blackwell Philosophy and PopCulture Series -- Dungeons & Dragons and Philosophy: Read and Gain Advantage on all Wisdom Checks -- Copyright -- Contents -- Abbreviations Used in the Text -- Introduction A Game Like No Other -- Part I Lawful Good vs. Chaotic Evil -- 1 Sympathy for the Devils: Free Will and Dungeons & Dragons -- Pity the Pit Fiend -- Damnation Without a Saving Throw -- Free Will in the Lair of the Succubus -- How Thorin Axebeard Randomly Defended the Bridge -- Four-Dimensional Dungeons and Powerless Dragons -- Free Will and Other Imaginary Monsters -- Notes -- 2 Paragons and Knaves: Does Good Character Make for a Good Character? -- The Good, the Bad, and the Legendary -- Taking Alignment Seriously -- Paladins and Trolleys -- The Ring of Gyges and the Arch-Lich -- Note -- 3 Is Anyone Actually Chaotic Evil?: A Playable Theory of Willful Wrongdoing -- No Dice -- Socrates, the First DM -- Aristotle - Unearthed Arcana -- Thomas Aquinas - 15th-Level Cleric -- Monster Immanuel -- Dietrich von Hildebrand - Third Edition Rules -- Hannah Arendt and the Campaign of Evil -- End of Round -- Notes -- Part II So Did You Win? Philosophy and D&D Gameplay -- 4 Save vs. Death: Some Reflections on the Lifecycle of PCs -- Death Be Not Proud -- Phaedo and Confronting the Reaper -- The Graveyard of Dead PCs -- Ability Scores: The Natural Lottery -- Notes -- 5 To My Other Self: Reflection and Existentialism in Dungeons & Dragons -- The Actor, the Author, and the Other -- In Word and Deed -- Mirror and Illusion -- Experience without EXP -- Notes -- 6 Player-Character Is What You Are in the Dark: The Phenomenology of Immersion in Dungeons & Dragons -- The Idea of Immersion Leads to Phenomenology -- What Is Phenomenology? -- Seeing Is Believing: Immersion as Visualization -- Am I My Character? Immersion and Identification.

Alea and Immersion: The Role of the Dice -- For Tyros and Grognards -- Notes -- Part III Crafting Worlds -- 7 Imagination and Creation: The Morality of Fiction in Dungeons & Dragons -- The Traditionalists (aka the "Lawful Good") -- D&D Rules! -- Lost in the Labyrinth? -- The Postmodernists (aka "Chaotic" and beyond Good and Evil...) -- A New Quest -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- 8 Dungeonmastery as Soulcraft -- The Essence of Fantasy -- The Magic of Morality -- The Consolation of Fantasy -- Worldbuilding as Moral Expression -- Missed Opportunities -- Notes -- Part IV Foray into The Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance -- 9 Menzoberranzan: A Perfect Unjust State -- The Myth of Gyges -- "Creatures of survival, not of principle" -- "I forgive your foolish thoughts … this time!" -- "What do you see that the rest of us cannot?" -- "His companions…viewed their surroundings through tainted eyes" -- "How I wish that one had learned his place, his values" -- Notes -- 10 Who Is Raistlin Majere? -- The Question and the Test -- Three Robes, Three Answers -- Taking the Test -- The Master of Past and Present -- Appendix : Tales of Raistlin -- Notes -- Part V The Ethics of Spellcasting -- 11 Expediency and Expendability: An Exhumation of the Morality of Necromancy -- From Killing to Kant: Exploring the [Evil] Descriptor -- The Ghost in the Machine: The Dualism of Dungeons & Dragons8 -- The [Evil]ness of the Undead: Euthyphro Revisited -- Necromancy for Fun and Profit: Some Examples Evaluated -- Hobbes, Machiavelli, and a Necromancer Walk into a Bar… -- Walk like an Egyptian: Necromancy as Taboo and a "Possible World" Argument -- Hug a Zombie: Recognizing and Moving Beyond Our Cultural Prejudice -- Notes -- 12 By Friendship or Force: Is it Ethical to Summon Animals to Fight by Your Side in Dungeons & Dragons? -- Mages and the Ethics of Summoning.

Wizards and the Ethics of Familiars -- Animal Ethics and Character Alignment -- Druids and the Ethics of Summoning Animals -- Trouble in the Druid Grove -- Notes -- Part VI Dungeons & Dragons Out in the Real World -- 13 "Kill her, kill her! Oh God, I'm sorry!": Spectating Dungeons & Dragons -- "Sixteen Diamonds' Worth of Dirt": Television and Dungeons & Dragons -- Legacies -- "Don't blow the Daily" Learning 2 Play -- Notes -- 14 Berserker in a Skirt: Sex and Gender in Dungeons & Dragons -- Sex and Gender -- Gender Games -- Fantasy and Imagination as Vehicles for Social Change -- Berserker in a Skirt -- Liberation and Laughter -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- 15 "Others play at dice"1: Friendship and Dungeons & Dragons -- WANTED -- WANTED -- "Someone pass the Mountain Dew" -- The Crusty Dagger: Food and Ale -- "The friendship of those who are good then, is friendship most of all" -- "I'm glad you're with me now at the end of all things" -- Notes -- Contributors -- Index.

Do demons and devils have free will? Does justice exist in Menzoberranzan? What's the morality involved with player characters casting necromancy and summoning spells? Dungeons & Dragons and Philosophy probes the rich terrain of philosophically compelling concepts and ideas that underlie Dungeons & Dragons, the legendary fantasy role-playing game that grew into a world-wide cultural phenomenon. A series of accessible essays reveals what the imaginary worlds of D&D can teach us about ethics, morality, metaphysics and more. Illustrates a wide variety of philosophical concepts and ideas that arise in Dungeons & Dragons gameplay and presents them in an accessible and entertaining manner Reveals how the strategies, tactics, improvisations, and role-play employed by D&D enthusiasts have startling parallels in the real world of philosophy Explores a wide range of philosophical topics, including the nature of free will, the metaphysics of personal identity, the morality of crafting fictions, sex and gender issues in tabletop gameplay, and friendship and collaborative storytelling Provides gamers with deep philosophical insights that can lead to a richer appreciation of D&D and any gaming experience.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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