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Archaic Style in English Literature, 1590–1674.

By: Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (322 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781107468962
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Archaic Style in English Literature, 1590–1674DDC classification:
  • 820.9004
LOC classification:
  • PR421 .M86 2013
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- Abbreviations -- Introduction: conceptualising archaism -- Chapter 1 Within our own memory: Old English and the early modern poet -- Very ancient and savage -- 'Nemp your sexes' -- The freedom of a translator -- West-Saxon poets -- Conclusion -- Chapter 2 Chaucer, Gower and the anxiety of obsolescence -- Obsolescence and the medieval poet -- The anxiety of obsolescence -- Against obsolescence -- Conclusion -- Chapter 3 Archaic style in religious writing: immutability, controversy, prophecy -- Archaism and religious diction: traditions and transitions -- Catholic poets and the plain style -- Radical Protestantism and prophecy -- Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Staging generations: archaism and the theatrical past -- Staging parody: The Staple of News and The Devil is an Ass -- Staging history: Sir Thomas More -- Staging players: Histriomastix -- Staging tragedy: Hamlet -- Conclusion -- Chapter 5 Shepherds' speech: archaism and Stuart pastoral drama -- Familiar stuff -- Missing Whitsun ales: The Faithful Shepherdess -- Doric delicacy: A Masque at Ludlow Castle -- Rustic play: The Sad Shepherd -- Conclusion -- Chapter 6 Archaism and the 'English' epic -- Fowly dight: Spenser, Ariosto, Fairfax, Tasso -- Long verse: Chapman and Cymbeline -- Yclepèd mud: Jonson and Cotton -- Grisly terror and blank verse: Milton -- Conclusion -- Coda: looking backward, looking forward -- Notes -- Introduction: conceptualising archaism -- 1 Within our own memory: Old English and the early modern poet -- 2 Chaucer, Gower and the anxiety of obsolescence -- 3 Archaic style in religious writing: immutability, controversy, prophecy -- 4 Staging generations: archaism and the theatrical past -- 5 Shepherds' speech: archaism and Stuart pastoral drama -- 6 Archaism and the 'English' epic -- Coda: looking backward, looking forward -- Index.
Summary: Munro explores the conscious use of archaic language by poets and dramatists including Shakespeare, Spenser, Jonson and Milton.
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Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00087332
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Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00087332
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Intro -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- Abbreviations -- Introduction: conceptualising archaism -- Chapter 1 Within our own memory: Old English and the early modern poet -- Very ancient and savage -- 'Nemp your sexes' -- The freedom of a translator -- West-Saxon poets -- Conclusion -- Chapter 2 Chaucer, Gower and the anxiety of obsolescence -- Obsolescence and the medieval poet -- The anxiety of obsolescence -- Against obsolescence -- Conclusion -- Chapter 3 Archaic style in religious writing: immutability, controversy, prophecy -- Archaism and religious diction: traditions and transitions -- Catholic poets and the plain style -- Radical Protestantism and prophecy -- Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Staging generations: archaism and the theatrical past -- Staging parody: The Staple of News and The Devil is an Ass -- Staging history: Sir Thomas More -- Staging players: Histriomastix -- Staging tragedy: Hamlet -- Conclusion -- Chapter 5 Shepherds' speech: archaism and Stuart pastoral drama -- Familiar stuff -- Missing Whitsun ales: The Faithful Shepherdess -- Doric delicacy: A Masque at Ludlow Castle -- Rustic play: The Sad Shepherd -- Conclusion -- Chapter 6 Archaism and the 'English' epic -- Fowly dight: Spenser, Ariosto, Fairfax, Tasso -- Long verse: Chapman and Cymbeline -- Yclepèd mud: Jonson and Cotton -- Grisly terror and blank verse: Milton -- Conclusion -- Coda: looking backward, looking forward -- Notes -- Introduction: conceptualising archaism -- 1 Within our own memory: Old English and the early modern poet -- 2 Chaucer, Gower and the anxiety of obsolescence -- 3 Archaic style in religious writing: immutability, controversy, prophecy -- 4 Staging generations: archaism and the theatrical past -- 5 Shepherds' speech: archaism and Stuart pastoral drama -- 6 Archaism and the 'English' epic -- Coda: looking backward, looking forward -- Index.

Munro explores the conscious use of archaic language by poets and dramatists including Shakespeare, Spenser, Jonson and Milton.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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