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Plato and the Post-Socratic Dialogue : The Return to the Philosophy of Nature.

By: Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (268 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781107468504
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Plato and the Post-Socratic Dialogue : The Return to the Philosophy of NatureDDC classification:
  • 184
LOC classification:
  • B395 .K235 2013
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Note on Chronology -- Chapter 1 The Parmenides -- 1.1 Part One: the six aporias -- Aporia 1. The population problem (130b-d) -- Aporia 2. The problem of participation (130e4-131e7) -- Aporia 3. The Third Man (132a1-b2) -- Aporia 4. Forms as thoughts (132b3-c11) -- Aporia 5. Forms as paradigms, of which the many are images or likenesses (132d-133a) -- Aporia 6. Separation as the last and greatest difficulty: two worlds with no causal or cognitive relation between them (133b-134e) -- 1.2 Part Two: the eight deductions -- Deduction 1 -- Deduction 3 -- Deduction 4 -- Deductions 5 and 6 -- Deductions 7 and 8 -- Deduction 2 -- Concluding comment on Part Two -- Chapter 2 The Theaetetus in the context of the later Dialogues -- 2.1 The hermeneutical problem: how to read the Theaetetus -- 2.2 Part One: knowledge as sense perception -- 2.3 The ontology of flux -- 2.4 The koina as the object of thought (dianoia) -- 2.5 The unique role of Being -- 2.6 Part Two: knowledge as true doxa and the problem of false judgment -- 2.7 Three Aporias on false judgment (188a-190e) -- 2.8 The wax tablet -- 2.9 The bird-cage -- 2.10 Rejecting the definition of knowledge as true judgment -- 2.11 Part Three: knowledge as true judgment with a logos -- 2.12 Socrates' dream: antecedents in the Cratylus -- 2.13 Socrates' dream: positive contributions -- 2.14 Fruitless attempts to interpret logos -- Appendix 1 On the narrow conception of aisthēsis in the central argument -- Appendix 2 The digression -- Appendix 3 Sense perception as a system of motions -- Chapter 3 Being and Not-Being in the Sophist -- 3.1 Limits of this Dialogue -- 3.2 Analysis of einai -- 3.3 The topic of Being in the Sophist -- 3.4 The aporias concerning Not-Being (237b-239b) -- 3.5 The aporias concerning Being: cosmologists and monists (242c-245e).
3.6 The battle between gods and giants: corporealists and Friends of Forms (246a-249d) -- 3.7 Final aporias about Being: (i) two modes of predication (249e-250e) -- 3.8 (ii) The last aporia: the paradox of the Late-learners (251a-c) -- 3.9 Refutation of the Late-learners: some Forms combine (251d-252c) -- 3.10 Not all Forms combine: Motion and Rest do not (252d) -- 3.11 Network of Forms (252e-254b) -- 3.12 Five great Forms and the definition of Not-Being -- 3.12.1 Proof that the five kinds are different from one another (254b-255e) -- 3.12.2 Examples of "X is not F" interpreted as "X is different from F" (255e-56c) -- 3.12.3 "X is not F" for F=Being, and also for X=Being (256c-57a) -- 3.12.4 First definition of Not-Being (257b-58c) -- 3.12.5 Second definition and summary of results (258c-59e) -- 3.13 Analysis of logos as propositional structure (260a-262e) -- 3.14 Definition of true and false logos (262e-263d) -- 3.15 Conclusion (263d-268d) -- Chapter 4 The new dialectic: from the Phaedrus to the Philebus -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Dialectic before the Phaedrus -- 4.3 Dialectic in the Phaedrus -- 4.4 Dialectic in the Sophist and the Statesman -- 4.4.1 Divisions in the Sophist -- 4.4.2 Divisions in the Statesman -- 4.4.3 Ontological basis for dialectic in the Sophist-Statesman -- 4.4.4 Function of dialectic in the Sophist-Statesman -- 4.5 Dialectic in the Philebus -- 4.5.1 General description of the method -- 4.5.2 Two examples: the alphabet -- musical notes and scales -- Chapter 5 The Philebus and the movement to cosmology -- 5.1 Plato's return to the subject matter of the Presocratics -- 5.2 The world as a work of art -- 5.3 Introduction of the world soul -- 5.4 Cosmology in the Philebus: the Announcement -- 5.5 Limit and Unlimited in the structure of the cosmos -- 5.6 Comparison with the Timaeus -- 5.7 Relation between cosmology and dialectic.
5.8 A sketch of cosmology as object of dialectic -- The noetic cosmos (realm of Being) -- The visible cosmos (realm of Becoming) -- Chapter 6 The Timaeus and the completion of the project: the recovery of the natural world -- 6.1 The myth of creation -- 6.2 The Forms as the model for creation -- 6.3 The extension of Forms in the model -- 6.4 Status of Becoming and the problem of flux -- 6.5 The Receptacle and the new introduction to creation (48e-53b) -- 6.5.1 The preliminary aporia and the new account of flux (49b-50a) -- 6.5.2 The Receptacle as the place for images (50a-52d1) -- 6.5.3 Argument for the Forms and final summary of the three principles (51b6-52d1) -- 6.5.4 State of the Receptacle before the Demiurge intervenes (52d-53b) -- 6.6 Images and imitation: the Timaeus solution to the problem of participation -- 6.7 Textual support for this interpretation -- 6.8 Final thoughts on the relation of mathematics to the Forms -- 6.9 Supplementary note on sense qualities in the Timaeus -- Epilogue. Plato as a political philosopher -- 1 Cosmology in Laws X -- 2 The myth of the Statesman -- 2.1 The myth -- 2.2 Definition of the Statesman -- 2.3 The "politikos" and the "politeiai" -- 2.4 The meaning of the myth -- 3 On the first best constitution in the Laws -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: These six diverse and difficult dialogues are seen together as aspects of Plato's project of reformulating his theory of Forms.
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Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Note on Chronology -- Chapter 1 The Parmenides -- 1.1 Part One: the six aporias -- Aporia 1. The population problem (130b-d) -- Aporia 2. The problem of participation (130e4-131e7) -- Aporia 3. The Third Man (132a1-b2) -- Aporia 4. Forms as thoughts (132b3-c11) -- Aporia 5. Forms as paradigms, of which the many are images or likenesses (132d-133a) -- Aporia 6. Separation as the last and greatest difficulty: two worlds with no causal or cognitive relation between them (133b-134e) -- 1.2 Part Two: the eight deductions -- Deduction 1 -- Deduction 3 -- Deduction 4 -- Deductions 5 and 6 -- Deductions 7 and 8 -- Deduction 2 -- Concluding comment on Part Two -- Chapter 2 The Theaetetus in the context of the later Dialogues -- 2.1 The hermeneutical problem: how to read the Theaetetus -- 2.2 Part One: knowledge as sense perception -- 2.3 The ontology of flux -- 2.4 The koina as the object of thought (dianoia) -- 2.5 The unique role of Being -- 2.6 Part Two: knowledge as true doxa and the problem of false judgment -- 2.7 Three Aporias on false judgment (188a-190e) -- 2.8 The wax tablet -- 2.9 The bird-cage -- 2.10 Rejecting the definition of knowledge as true judgment -- 2.11 Part Three: knowledge as true judgment with a logos -- 2.12 Socrates' dream: antecedents in the Cratylus -- 2.13 Socrates' dream: positive contributions -- 2.14 Fruitless attempts to interpret logos -- Appendix 1 On the narrow conception of aisthēsis in the central argument -- Appendix 2 The digression -- Appendix 3 Sense perception as a system of motions -- Chapter 3 Being and Not-Being in the Sophist -- 3.1 Limits of this Dialogue -- 3.2 Analysis of einai -- 3.3 The topic of Being in the Sophist -- 3.4 The aporias concerning Not-Being (237b-239b) -- 3.5 The aporias concerning Being: cosmologists and monists (242c-245e).

3.6 The battle between gods and giants: corporealists and Friends of Forms (246a-249d) -- 3.7 Final aporias about Being: (i) two modes of predication (249e-250e) -- 3.8 (ii) The last aporia: the paradox of the Late-learners (251a-c) -- 3.9 Refutation of the Late-learners: some Forms combine (251d-252c) -- 3.10 Not all Forms combine: Motion and Rest do not (252d) -- 3.11 Network of Forms (252e-254b) -- 3.12 Five great Forms and the definition of Not-Being -- 3.12.1 Proof that the five kinds are different from one another (254b-255e) -- 3.12.2 Examples of "X is not F" interpreted as "X is different from F" (255e-56c) -- 3.12.3 "X is not F" for F=Being, and also for X=Being (256c-57a) -- 3.12.4 First definition of Not-Being (257b-58c) -- 3.12.5 Second definition and summary of results (258c-59e) -- 3.13 Analysis of logos as propositional structure (260a-262e) -- 3.14 Definition of true and false logos (262e-263d) -- 3.15 Conclusion (263d-268d) -- Chapter 4 The new dialectic: from the Phaedrus to the Philebus -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Dialectic before the Phaedrus -- 4.3 Dialectic in the Phaedrus -- 4.4 Dialectic in the Sophist and the Statesman -- 4.4.1 Divisions in the Sophist -- 4.4.2 Divisions in the Statesman -- 4.4.3 Ontological basis for dialectic in the Sophist-Statesman -- 4.4.4 Function of dialectic in the Sophist-Statesman -- 4.5 Dialectic in the Philebus -- 4.5.1 General description of the method -- 4.5.2 Two examples: the alphabet -- musical notes and scales -- Chapter 5 The Philebus and the movement to cosmology -- 5.1 Plato's return to the subject matter of the Presocratics -- 5.2 The world as a work of art -- 5.3 Introduction of the world soul -- 5.4 Cosmology in the Philebus: the Announcement -- 5.5 Limit and Unlimited in the structure of the cosmos -- 5.6 Comparison with the Timaeus -- 5.7 Relation between cosmology and dialectic.

5.8 A sketch of cosmology as object of dialectic -- The noetic cosmos (realm of Being) -- The visible cosmos (realm of Becoming) -- Chapter 6 The Timaeus and the completion of the project: the recovery of the natural world -- 6.1 The myth of creation -- 6.2 The Forms as the model for creation -- 6.3 The extension of Forms in the model -- 6.4 Status of Becoming and the problem of flux -- 6.5 The Receptacle and the new introduction to creation (48e-53b) -- 6.5.1 The preliminary aporia and the new account of flux (49b-50a) -- 6.5.2 The Receptacle as the place for images (50a-52d1) -- 6.5.3 Argument for the Forms and final summary of the three principles (51b6-52d1) -- 6.5.4 State of the Receptacle before the Demiurge intervenes (52d-53b) -- 6.6 Images and imitation: the Timaeus solution to the problem of participation -- 6.7 Textual support for this interpretation -- 6.8 Final thoughts on the relation of mathematics to the Forms -- 6.9 Supplementary note on sense qualities in the Timaeus -- Epilogue. Plato as a political philosopher -- 1 Cosmology in Laws X -- 2 The myth of the Statesman -- 2.1 The myth -- 2.2 Definition of the Statesman -- 2.3 The "politikos" and the "politeiai" -- 2.4 The meaning of the myth -- 3 On the first best constitution in the Laws -- Bibliography -- Index.

These six diverse and difficult dialogues are seen together as aspects of Plato's project of reformulating his theory of Forms.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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