Touching the Past : Studies in the historical sociolinguistics of ego-documents.

By: Wal, Marijke J. van derContributor(s): Rutten, GijsbertSeries: Advances in Historical SociolinguisticsPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (287 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027271778Subject(s): Sociolinguistics -- History.;Linguistic change -- Social aspects -- History.;Autobiography in literature.;Historical linguisticsGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Touching the Past : Studies in the historical sociolinguistics of ego-documentsDDC classification: 306.44 LOC classification: P40 -- .T66 2013ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Preface & Acknowledgements -- Ego-documents in a historical-sociolinguistic perspective -- 1. Ego-documents -- 2. Social difference and variation in context -- 3. Representing the self -- 4. Speech and writing -- 5. Concluding -- References -- A lady-in-waiting's begging letter to her former employer (Paris, mid-sixteenth century) -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Mlle de la Tousche's begging letter (Letter I) -- 3. The letter's writing system -- 3.1 Assibilation of intervocalic /r/ → /z/ -- 3.2 "Ouisme" -- 3.3 Lowering of [er] → [ar] -- 3.4 Lowering of nasals -- 3.5 Past historic in -I -- 3.6 Endings of the third person plural -- 3.7 Learned features -- 4. Who was Mlle de la Tousche? Did she write the letter herself ? -- 4.1 Who was Mlle de la Tousche? -- 4.2 Is the letter an autograph? -- 5. The letter of "Jaquelin[e] de Reboul" (Letter II) -- 6. Contemporary attitudes to towards these vernacular variants -- 6.1 Assibilation [r] → [z] -- 6.2 Ouisme -- 6.3 [er] → [ar] -- 6.4 Lowering of nasals -- 6.5 Past historics in -i -- 6.6 Endings of the third person plural -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- Translation of letter 1 -- To the Queen of Scotland -- Translation of Letter 2 -- Epistolary formulae and writing experience in Dutch letters from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The written culture and letter writing -- 2.1 Reading -- 2.2 Writing -- 3. Formulaic language and writing experience -- 4. Case study -- 4.1 The two subcorpora -- 4.2 Two formulae -- 4.3 Hypotheses -- 4.4 Results -- 5. Discussion and conclusion -- References -- From ul to U.E. -- 1. Introduction: A new view -- 2. The Letters as loot corpora -- 3. Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century forms of address: A wealth of options -- 3.1 Ul and U.E. -- 3.2 Gij and u -- 3.3 The new form jij and its inflected forms.
3.4 Earlier research on the use of forms of address in the two centuries -- 4. The seventeenth century -- 4.1 Overview -- 4.2 Social class: Lower classes vs. upper classes -- 4.3 Gender: Familiar differences -- 5. The eighteenth century: The omnipresence of U.E. -- 5.1 Overview -- 5.2 Social class: A gradual increase -- 5.3 Gender: Equality -- 6. Comparisons and conclusions -- 6.1 The seventeenth- and eighteenth-century forms of address compared -- 6.2 The present results compared to earlier research -- 6.3 Conclusion -- References -- Flat adverbs and Jane Austen's letters -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Jane Austen's letters -- 3. Flat adverbs in Jane Austen's letters -- 4. The normative grammars and actual usage -- 5. Influence from the normative grammars? -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Letters from Gaston B. -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Interest in the language of soldiers in the Great War -- 3. The Republican education system -- 3.1 The legislation of Jules Ferry -- 3.2 School grammar -- 3.3 French and dialects at school -- 4. Gaston B. as a speaker and writer -- 5. Gaston B.'s language and prescriptivism -- 5.1 Some socio-pragmatic factors -- 5.2 Handwriting and segmentation of words -- 5.3 Orthography and syntax -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix 1. A sample of Gaston's letter -- Appendix 2. A trancription of the sample of Gaston's letter -- Written documents -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Large historical sociolinguistics corpora -- 2.1 Metalinguistic corpora -- 2.2 Literary corpora -- 2.3 Family letters -- 3. Hybridity and egodocuments -- 3.1 Charles-André Barthe's diary -- 3.1.1 Spelling and phonological features -- 3.1.2 Morphosyntactic features -- 4. Egodocuments and linguistic communities in a minority context -- 4.1 The Detroit region: From French to English influence -- 4.2 Vernacular features and English borrowings.
4.3 Language shift from French to English -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- The rhetoric of autobiography in the seventeenth century -- 1. Rhetoric and performance -- 2. Occasions of autobiography -- 3. Styles and plots -- 4. Grace abounding -- References -- "All the rest ye must lade yourself"* -- 1. Introduction -- 2. John Johnson and his network -- 3. Reconstructing power and social distance -- 3.1 Reconstructing relative power -- 3.2 Measuring social distance by network ties -- 4. Deontic modality -- 4.1 Modality and power -- 4.2 Modality and social distance -- 4.3 Power, social distance and modality -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Cordials and sharp satyrs -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The correspondence -- 3. Intertextuality in letters -- 4. Verbal irony in the age of politeness -- 5. Results -- 5.1 Epistolary conventions and the lexicalization of mental states -- 5.2 Intertextuality and irony -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Self-reference and ego involvement in the 1820 Settler petition as a leaking genre -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Petition as a leaking genre -- 3. Private vs. public distinction in historical correspondence -- 3.1 The Landert & Jucker (2011) model -- 3.2 1820 Settler petition within the Landert & Jucker (2001) model -- 4. Self-reference as a feature of ego involvement -- 4.1. Self-reference in historical correspondence -- 4.2 Self-reference in the structural models of the 1820 Settler petition -- 4.3 Third-person reference -- 5. 1820 Settlers: The Eriths -- 6. Jane Erith's petitions: A case study -- 6.1 The hypothesis -- 6.2 Data: Corpora and informants -- 6.3 Switches in self-reference -- 6.4 Social roles -- 6.5 I-reference: A quantitative survey -- 6.6 Summary of the case study -- 7. Conclusions -- References -- Manuscripts -- Printed material -- The language of slaves on the island of St Helena, South Atlantic, 1682-1724.
1. Introduction -- 2. The island of St Helena, South Atlantic, and early court-cases involving slaves -- 3. Linguistic commentary -- 3.1 Some comments on Table 2 -- 3.3 Summary -- 4. Master-slave conditions on the island -- 4.1 Different groups of slaves -- 4.2 On slaves' names in the St Helena consultations -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Manuscripts -- Printed material -- Databases -- Appendix -- Transcription from London, British Library, MS IOR G/32/2 and MS IOR G/32/3.
Summary: This paper considers reported speech of slaves in court records from the island of St Helena in the South Atlantic. It constitutes some of the earliest evidence of slaves' language anywhere, and shows that the early slave community on the island of St Helena spoke a creoloid, as well as non-standard Southern English. Nothing is known about the personal history of the slaves apart from some of their names. These names are analysed, and by comparison with name-usage in eighteenth-century London, it is concluded that they betray contemporary British attitudes to slavery. Thus, data is presented on the early linguistic situation of St Helena, showing that creoloidisation happened early on as a result of slavery, and conclusions about master-slave relationships during the period are drawn on the basis of the analysis of names.
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Intro -- Preface & Acknowledgements -- Ego-documents in a historical-sociolinguistic perspective -- 1. Ego-documents -- 2. Social difference and variation in context -- 3. Representing the self -- 4. Speech and writing -- 5. Concluding -- References -- A lady-in-waiting's begging letter to her former employer (Paris, mid-sixteenth century) -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Mlle de la Tousche's begging letter (Letter I) -- 3. The letter's writing system -- 3.1 Assibilation of intervocalic /r/ → /z/ -- 3.2 "Ouisme" -- 3.3 Lowering of [er] → [ar] -- 3.4 Lowering of nasals -- 3.5 Past historic in -I -- 3.6 Endings of the third person plural -- 3.7 Learned features -- 4. Who was Mlle de la Tousche? Did she write the letter herself ? -- 4.1 Who was Mlle de la Tousche? -- 4.2 Is the letter an autograph? -- 5. The letter of "Jaquelin[e] de Reboul" (Letter II) -- 6. Contemporary attitudes to towards these vernacular variants -- 6.1 Assibilation [r] → [z] -- 6.2 Ouisme -- 6.3 [er] → [ar] -- 6.4 Lowering of nasals -- 6.5 Past historics in -i -- 6.6 Endings of the third person plural -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- Translation of letter 1 -- To the Queen of Scotland -- Translation of Letter 2 -- Epistolary formulae and writing experience in Dutch letters from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The written culture and letter writing -- 2.1 Reading -- 2.2 Writing -- 3. Formulaic language and writing experience -- 4. Case study -- 4.1 The two subcorpora -- 4.2 Two formulae -- 4.3 Hypotheses -- 4.4 Results -- 5. Discussion and conclusion -- References -- From ul to U.E. -- 1. Introduction: A new view -- 2. The Letters as loot corpora -- 3. Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century forms of address: A wealth of options -- 3.1 Ul and U.E. -- 3.2 Gij and u -- 3.3 The new form jij and its inflected forms.

3.4 Earlier research on the use of forms of address in the two centuries -- 4. The seventeenth century -- 4.1 Overview -- 4.2 Social class: Lower classes vs. upper classes -- 4.3 Gender: Familiar differences -- 5. The eighteenth century: The omnipresence of U.E. -- 5.1 Overview -- 5.2 Social class: A gradual increase -- 5.3 Gender: Equality -- 6. Comparisons and conclusions -- 6.1 The seventeenth- and eighteenth-century forms of address compared -- 6.2 The present results compared to earlier research -- 6.3 Conclusion -- References -- Flat adverbs and Jane Austen's letters -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Jane Austen's letters -- 3. Flat adverbs in Jane Austen's letters -- 4. The normative grammars and actual usage -- 5. Influence from the normative grammars? -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Letters from Gaston B. -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Interest in the language of soldiers in the Great War -- 3. The Republican education system -- 3.1 The legislation of Jules Ferry -- 3.2 School grammar -- 3.3 French and dialects at school -- 4. Gaston B. as a speaker and writer -- 5. Gaston B.'s language and prescriptivism -- 5.1 Some socio-pragmatic factors -- 5.2 Handwriting and segmentation of words -- 5.3 Orthography and syntax -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix 1. A sample of Gaston's letter -- Appendix 2. A trancription of the sample of Gaston's letter -- Written documents -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Large historical sociolinguistics corpora -- 2.1 Metalinguistic corpora -- 2.2 Literary corpora -- 2.3 Family letters -- 3. Hybridity and egodocuments -- 3.1 Charles-André Barthe's diary -- 3.1.1 Spelling and phonological features -- 3.1.2 Morphosyntactic features -- 4. Egodocuments and linguistic communities in a minority context -- 4.1 The Detroit region: From French to English influence -- 4.2 Vernacular features and English borrowings.

4.3 Language shift from French to English -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- The rhetoric of autobiography in the seventeenth century -- 1. Rhetoric and performance -- 2. Occasions of autobiography -- 3. Styles and plots -- 4. Grace abounding -- References -- "All the rest ye must lade yourself"* -- 1. Introduction -- 2. John Johnson and his network -- 3. Reconstructing power and social distance -- 3.1 Reconstructing relative power -- 3.2 Measuring social distance by network ties -- 4. Deontic modality -- 4.1 Modality and power -- 4.2 Modality and social distance -- 4.3 Power, social distance and modality -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Cordials and sharp satyrs -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The correspondence -- 3. Intertextuality in letters -- 4. Verbal irony in the age of politeness -- 5. Results -- 5.1 Epistolary conventions and the lexicalization of mental states -- 5.2 Intertextuality and irony -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Self-reference and ego involvement in the 1820 Settler petition as a leaking genre -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Petition as a leaking genre -- 3. Private vs. public distinction in historical correspondence -- 3.1 The Landert & Jucker (2011) model -- 3.2 1820 Settler petition within the Landert & Jucker (2001) model -- 4. Self-reference as a feature of ego involvement -- 4.1. Self-reference in historical correspondence -- 4.2 Self-reference in the structural models of the 1820 Settler petition -- 4.3 Third-person reference -- 5. 1820 Settlers: The Eriths -- 6. Jane Erith's petitions: A case study -- 6.1 The hypothesis -- 6.2 Data: Corpora and informants -- 6.3 Switches in self-reference -- 6.4 Social roles -- 6.5 I-reference: A quantitative survey -- 6.6 Summary of the case study -- 7. Conclusions -- References -- Manuscripts -- Printed material -- The language of slaves on the island of St Helena, South Atlantic, 1682-1724.

1. Introduction -- 2. The island of St Helena, South Atlantic, and early court-cases involving slaves -- 3. Linguistic commentary -- 3.1 Some comments on Table 2 -- 3.3 Summary -- 4. Master-slave conditions on the island -- 4.1 Different groups of slaves -- 4.2 On slaves' names in the St Helena consultations -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Manuscripts -- Printed material -- Databases -- Appendix -- Transcription from London, British Library, MS IOR G/32/2 and MS IOR G/32/3.

This paper considers reported speech of slaves in court records from the island of St Helena in the South Atlantic. It constitutes some of the earliest evidence of slaves' language anywhere, and shows that the early slave community on the island of St Helena spoke a creoloid, as well as non-standard Southern English. Nothing is known about the personal history of the slaves apart from some of their names. These names are analysed, and by comparison with name-usage in eighteenth-century London, it is concluded that they betray contemporary British attitudes to slavery. Thus, data is presented on the early linguistic situation of St Helena, showing that creoloidisation happened early on as a result of slavery, and conclusions about master-slave relationships during the period are drawn on the basis of the analysis of names.

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