Foundations of an Ethics of Belief.

By: Meylan, AnneSeries: Practical Philosophy SerPublisher: Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc., 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (218 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783110327816Subject(s): Ethics.;Social ethicsGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Foundations of an Ethics of BeliefDDC classification: 121.6 LOC classification: BJ1012.M49 2013ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- TABLE OF CONTENTS -- INTRODUCTION -- The initial intuition -- Main objective -- Preliminary clarificatory remarks -- Two central problems -- The problem of control and responsibility -- The normative problem -- Abstracts of the chapters -- Chapter 1: What the philosophy of action teaches us -- Chapter 2: The impossibility of acquiring beliefs directly for reasons -- Chapter 3: Pascalian and theoretical control -- Chapter 4: Doxastic responsibility as responsibility for consequences -- Chapter 5: Epistemic praiseworthiness and epistemic blameworthiness -- Chapter 6: Beyond epistemic justifiedness -- Chapter 7: Epistemic justifiedness and non-epistemic justifiedness -- Chapter 1: What the philosophy of action teaches us -- Actions and happenings -- Non-reductionist conception of action -- Reductionist conception of action -- Actions, happenings and activities -- Acting for reasons -- Three distinctions about reasons -- Motivating reasons vs. normative reasons -- Internalism vs. externalism about reasons -- Humean vs. anti-Humean conception of motivation -- Back to the doxastic realm -- Epistemic reasons, non-epistemic reasons and evidence -- Delineating the interesting issue -- Chapter 2: The Impossibility of directly acquiring beliefs for reasons -- Direct and indirect belief acquisitions -- Direct/indirect acquisitions of belief and epistemic/non-epistemic reasons -- Williams' argument -- "To believe that p is to believe that p is true" -- Believing vs. imagining -- Transparency -- The teleological account -- Conclusions -- Chapter 3: Theoretical and Pascalian control -- Two forms of indirect doxastic control -- Theoretical control -- Pascalian control -- Indirect doxastic influence on belief acquisitions -- Unlimited doxastic control considered -- Ryan's unlimited doxastic control -- Pieces of evidence vs. motivating reasons.
Steup's unlimited doxastic control -- Chapter 4: Doxastic Responsibility as Responsibility for Consequences -- Responsibility for consequences -- Responsibility for basic actions -- Responsibility for the consequences of actions -- Responsibility for resultant belief acquisitions, theoretical and Pascalian control -- Responsibility for resultant belief acquisitions and indirect doxastic influence -- Responsibility for believing -- Chapter 5: Epistemic praiseworthiness and blameworthiness -- Epistemic and non-epistemic desirability -- The fundamental epistemic end -- Other epistemically desirable states -- The fundamental epistemic end: some specifications -- Epistemic and non-epistemic ends: summary -- Varieties of epistemic goodness* -- Final and instrumental epistemic goodness -- Epistemic rationality and epistemic commendability -- Varieties of epistemic praiseworthiness and blameworthiness -- Final and instrumental epistemic praiseworthiness and blameworthiness -- Epistemic praiseworthiness/blameworthiness for rational belief acquisitions -- Epistemic praiseworthiness for epistemically commendable belief acquisitions and epistemic blameworthiness for epistemically non-commendable belief acquisitions -- Chapter 6: Beyond epistemic justifiedness -- Accessibilism, mentalism, and externalism -- Accessibilism and perceptual disjunctivism -- Normative properties -- Valuable, rational, commendable belief acquisitions and the threefold classification of justifiedness -- Externalism: the goodness* of instrumental goodness -- Mentalism: the goodness* of rationality -- Accessibilism: the goodness* of commendability -- The reliabilist and the accessibilist explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness -- The reliabilist explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness -- The credit explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness.
Accessibilist explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness -- Chapter 7: Epistemic and non-epistemic justifiedness -- The divergence thesis -- The "pragmatic" refutation of the divergence thesis: Clifford and James -- Clifford's ethics of belief -- James' ethics of belief -- The point of agreement -- The divergence of rationality -- The objection against the divergence of rationality -- Conclusion -- Bibliography.
Summary: The aim of the series is to publish high-quality studies in English or German that deal with topics in practical philosophy from a broadly analytic perspective. These include questions in meta-ethics, normative ethics and ‛applied' ethics, as well as in political philosophy, philosophy of law and the philosophy of action.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan
Available EBKAF00081149
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal
Available EBKNP00081149
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan

Access a wide range of magazines and books using Pressreader and Ebook central.

Enjoy your reading, British Council Sudan.

Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia
Available
Total holds: 0

Intro -- TABLE OF CONTENTS -- INTRODUCTION -- The initial intuition -- Main objective -- Preliminary clarificatory remarks -- Two central problems -- The problem of control and responsibility -- The normative problem -- Abstracts of the chapters -- Chapter 1: What the philosophy of action teaches us -- Chapter 2: The impossibility of acquiring beliefs directly for reasons -- Chapter 3: Pascalian and theoretical control -- Chapter 4: Doxastic responsibility as responsibility for consequences -- Chapter 5: Epistemic praiseworthiness and epistemic blameworthiness -- Chapter 6: Beyond epistemic justifiedness -- Chapter 7: Epistemic justifiedness and non-epistemic justifiedness -- Chapter 1: What the philosophy of action teaches us -- Actions and happenings -- Non-reductionist conception of action -- Reductionist conception of action -- Actions, happenings and activities -- Acting for reasons -- Three distinctions about reasons -- Motivating reasons vs. normative reasons -- Internalism vs. externalism about reasons -- Humean vs. anti-Humean conception of motivation -- Back to the doxastic realm -- Epistemic reasons, non-epistemic reasons and evidence -- Delineating the interesting issue -- Chapter 2: The Impossibility of directly acquiring beliefs for reasons -- Direct and indirect belief acquisitions -- Direct/indirect acquisitions of belief and epistemic/non-epistemic reasons -- Williams' argument -- "To believe that p is to believe that p is true" -- Believing vs. imagining -- Transparency -- The teleological account -- Conclusions -- Chapter 3: Theoretical and Pascalian control -- Two forms of indirect doxastic control -- Theoretical control -- Pascalian control -- Indirect doxastic influence on belief acquisitions -- Unlimited doxastic control considered -- Ryan's unlimited doxastic control -- Pieces of evidence vs. motivating reasons.

Steup's unlimited doxastic control -- Chapter 4: Doxastic Responsibility as Responsibility for Consequences -- Responsibility for consequences -- Responsibility for basic actions -- Responsibility for the consequences of actions -- Responsibility for resultant belief acquisitions, theoretical and Pascalian control -- Responsibility for resultant belief acquisitions and indirect doxastic influence -- Responsibility for believing -- Chapter 5: Epistemic praiseworthiness and blameworthiness -- Epistemic and non-epistemic desirability -- The fundamental epistemic end -- Other epistemically desirable states -- The fundamental epistemic end: some specifications -- Epistemic and non-epistemic ends: summary -- Varieties of epistemic goodness* -- Final and instrumental epistemic goodness -- Epistemic rationality and epistemic commendability -- Varieties of epistemic praiseworthiness and blameworthiness -- Final and instrumental epistemic praiseworthiness and blameworthiness -- Epistemic praiseworthiness/blameworthiness for rational belief acquisitions -- Epistemic praiseworthiness for epistemically commendable belief acquisitions and epistemic blameworthiness for epistemically non-commendable belief acquisitions -- Chapter 6: Beyond epistemic justifiedness -- Accessibilism, mentalism, and externalism -- Accessibilism and perceptual disjunctivism -- Normative properties -- Valuable, rational, commendable belief acquisitions and the threefold classification of justifiedness -- Externalism: the goodness* of instrumental goodness -- Mentalism: the goodness* of rationality -- Accessibilism: the goodness* of commendability -- The reliabilist and the accessibilist explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness -- The reliabilist explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness -- The credit explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness.

Accessibilist explanation of the goodness* of justifiedness -- Chapter 7: Epistemic and non-epistemic justifiedness -- The divergence thesis -- The "pragmatic" refutation of the divergence thesis: Clifford and James -- Clifford's ethics of belief -- James' ethics of belief -- The point of agreement -- The divergence of rationality -- The objection against the divergence of rationality -- Conclusion -- Bibliography.

The aim of the series is to publish high-quality studies in English or German that deal with topics in practical philosophy from a broadly analytic perspective. These include questions in meta-ethics, normative ethics and ‛applied' ethics, as well as in political philosophy, philosophy of law and the philosophy of action.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.