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Rei(g)n of 'Rule'.

By: Series: Aporia SerPublisher: Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc., 2013Copyright date: ©2010Description: 1 online resource (132 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9783110321869
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rei(g)n of 'Rule'DDC classification:
  • 401
LOC classification:
  • P107.R54 2010eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- I . Rules, Norms and Conventions -- 1. Why norms are not conventions and conventions are not norms -- 1.1 The tension of normativity -- 1.2 Two concepts of arbitrariness: Saussure and Lewis -- 1.3 Can conventions become norms? -- 1.4 Rules -- 2. Cavell on normative necessity: The philosopher, the baker, and the pantomime of caution -- 2.1 "I am less interested now in the "mean" than I am in the "must"" -- 2.2 "Here the pantomime of caution concludes" -- 2.3 "…the hopelessness of speaking, in a general way, about the "normativeness" of expressions" -- II. Rules as conventions vs. rules as norms in the rule-following debates -- 3. What is a rule and what ought it to be -- 3.1 The reduction of rules to conventions vs. the reduction of rules to norms -- 3.2 Kripke: The reduction of rules to conventions1 -- 3.3 Baker and Hacker: The reduction of rules to norms -- 3.4 Meredith Williams on normative necessity -- 3.5 Cora Diamond: Rules and their right place -- III. Twisted Language -- 4. Davidson on rules, conventions and norms -- 4.1. Normativity without conventionality -- 4.2 Communication without rules or conventions -- 4.3 "The second person" vs. the community view -- 4.4 The two kinds of normativity -- 4.5 The unpacking of 'ought'18 -- 4.6 Normativity without norms -- 5. Searle on rules (of rationality, conversation and speech acts) -- 5.1 The shortcut argument against rule -- 5.2 Is language a rule governed form of behavior or is it not? -- 5.3 (No) Rules of conversation -- 5.4 Background brought to the foreground -- Conclusion.
Summary: Aiming to bridge the gap between analytical and continental philosophy, this double-blind peer-reviewed series presents innovative, cutting-edgecontributions in contemporary philosophical inquiry, written in English or German. The series is a useful introduction to a variety of topics, aimed at readers interested in the concepts, methods, and historical developments of philosophy.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00081116
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00081116
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Intro -- I . Rules, Norms and Conventions -- 1. Why norms are not conventions and conventions are not norms -- 1.1 The tension of normativity -- 1.2 Two concepts of arbitrariness: Saussure and Lewis -- 1.3 Can conventions become norms? -- 1.4 Rules -- 2. Cavell on normative necessity: The philosopher, the baker, and the pantomime of caution -- 2.1 "I am less interested now in the "mean" than I am in the "must"" -- 2.2 "Here the pantomime of caution concludes" -- 2.3 "…the hopelessness of speaking, in a general way, about the "normativeness" of expressions" -- II. Rules as conventions vs. rules as norms in the rule-following debates -- 3. What is a rule and what ought it to be -- 3.1 The reduction of rules to conventions vs. the reduction of rules to norms -- 3.2 Kripke: The reduction of rules to conventions1 -- 3.3 Baker and Hacker: The reduction of rules to norms -- 3.4 Meredith Williams on normative necessity -- 3.5 Cora Diamond: Rules and their right place -- III. Twisted Language -- 4. Davidson on rules, conventions and norms -- 4.1. Normativity without conventionality -- 4.2 Communication without rules or conventions -- 4.3 "The second person" vs. the community view -- 4.4 The two kinds of normativity -- 4.5 The unpacking of 'ought'18 -- 4.6 Normativity without norms -- 5. Searle on rules (of rationality, conversation and speech acts) -- 5.1 The shortcut argument against rule -- 5.2 Is language a rule governed form of behavior or is it not? -- 5.3 (No) Rules of conversation -- 5.4 Background brought to the foreground -- Conclusion.

Aiming to bridge the gap between analytical and continental philosophy, this double-blind peer-reviewed series presents innovative, cutting-edgecontributions in contemporary philosophical inquiry, written in English or German. The series is a useful introduction to a variety of topics, aimed at readers interested in the concepts, methods, and historical developments of philosophy.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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