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The Philosophy of Tragedy : From Plato to Žižek.

By: Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (304 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781107057876
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Philosophy of Tragedy : From Plato to ŽižekDDC classification:
  • 809.9162
LOC classification:
  • BH301.T7 Y68 2013
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- The Philosophy of Tragedy -- Title -- Copyright -- Introduction -- 1 Plato -- Culture Wars in Fourth-Century Athens -- Preliminary Skirmishes -- The Unreliability of Inspiration -- 'The Poets Lie Too Much' -- The Painting Argument -- The Stiff-Upper-Lip Argument -- 2 Aristotle -- Mimesis -- Catharsis -- The Tragic Hero -- Hamartia -- Criticism -- 3 After Aristotle -- Horace, Castelvetro and Rapin -- Seneca -- Stoic Philosophy -- Seneca's Plays -- The Puzzle -- The Solution -- Criticism -- 4 Hume -- French Discussions of Tragic Pleasure -- Hume's 'Conversion' Theory -- Criticism -- 5 Schelling -- Kant, Fichte, Spinoza and the Problem of Freedom -- Philosophy Alone Cannot Establish the Reality of Freedom -- Why Art? -- Why Tragedy in Particular? -- The Inferiority of Modern Tragedy -- The Form of Greek Tragedy -- The Content of Greek Tragedy -- The Tragic Effect -- Kant on the Sublime -- Schelling on the Sublime -- Criticism -- 6 Hölderlin -- The Human Condition: 'Sobriety' versus 'Intoxication' -- The Modern Condition: Us versus the Greeks -- The 'Free Use' of the Apollonian -- Why We Need to Recover the Dionysian -- Dionysian Unity -- Tragedy and the Dionysian -- Criticism -- 7 Hegel -- Ethical Substance -- The Tragic Conflict -- The Tragic Hero -- The Cause of the Tragic Conflict: Hegel's Account of Hamartia -- The Tragic Resolution -- Hegel and Catharsis -- Modern Tragedy -- Fate -- Oedipus -- Agamemnon -- 'Hegelian' versus 'Fateful' Tragedy -- Is Hegel Unfair to Shakespeare? -- 8 Kierkegaard -- Modernity and Subjectivity -- The Greek Tragic Hero: Freedom, Fate, Hamartia and the Tragic Effect -- Kierkegaard versus Hegel on Greek Tragedy -- Modern Tragedy -- Rewriting Antigone -- Criticism -- 9 Schopenhauer -- Schopenhauer's General Philosophy -- What Is Art? -- The Beautiful -- The Sublime -- The Poetics of Tragedy -- Tragic Pleasure.
Fear and Pity -- Modern versus Greek Tragedy -- Criticism -- 10 Nietzsche -- The Problem: The Threat of Nihilism -- Homer's Apollonian Art -- The Apollonian Solution to Nihilism -- The Dionysian -- Tragic Joy -- How Greek Tragedy Produced Tragic Joy -- The 'Primordial Unity' as a Natural Being -- The 'Noble Deception' -- Only as an 'Aesthetic Phenomenon' Is Life 'Justified' -- Socrates and the Death of Tragedy -- Does Nietzsche Answer the Question? -- Criticism -- 11 Benjamin and Schmitt -- Tragedy versus Mourning Play -- Myth versus Current Affairs -- Moral 'Agon' versus the 'Death of Martyrs' -- Stoical versus Sublime Death -- Continuous versus Discontinuous Action -- Onstage versus Offstage Violence -- Mourning versus Fear and Pity -- Aesthetic Relativism -- The Inconsistency of the Criteria Definitive of a Mourning Play -- Mourning Play versus Martyr Play -- Is Hamlet a Mourning Play? -- Martyr Play versus Tragedy -- Schmitt -- Hamlet -- Tragedy versus Trauerspiel -- Criticism -- 12 Heidegger -- The Central Account -- Ontology and Ethics -- The Content of Tragedy -- Heidegger and Wagner -- Creation versus Articulation -- The Ister Lectures -- Criticism -- The Possibility of Modern Tragedy -- 13 Camus -- The Conditions under Which Tragedy Arises -- What Is Tragedy? -- Camus on the Tragic Effect -- The Death of Ancient and Renaissance Tragedy -- The Possibility of the Rebirth of Tragedy -- Camus and Hegel -- 14 Arthur Miller -- Is Tragedy Possible Now? -- The Tragic Hero -- The Tragic Conflict -- Hamartia -- The Tragic Effect -- Tragedy and Pessimism -- Criticism -- 15 Žižek -- What Is Tragedy? -- The Enemies of Tragedy -- Criticism -- 16 Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: This book, written in an accessible style, is an exhaustive survey of the philosophy of tragedy from antiquity to the present.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00079162
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00079162
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Total holds: 0

Cover -- The Philosophy of Tragedy -- Title -- Copyright -- Introduction -- 1 Plato -- Culture Wars in Fourth-Century Athens -- Preliminary Skirmishes -- The Unreliability of Inspiration -- 'The Poets Lie Too Much' -- The Painting Argument -- The Stiff-Upper-Lip Argument -- 2 Aristotle -- Mimesis -- Catharsis -- The Tragic Hero -- Hamartia -- Criticism -- 3 After Aristotle -- Horace, Castelvetro and Rapin -- Seneca -- Stoic Philosophy -- Seneca's Plays -- The Puzzle -- The Solution -- Criticism -- 4 Hume -- French Discussions of Tragic Pleasure -- Hume's 'Conversion' Theory -- Criticism -- 5 Schelling -- Kant, Fichte, Spinoza and the Problem of Freedom -- Philosophy Alone Cannot Establish the Reality of Freedom -- Why Art? -- Why Tragedy in Particular? -- The Inferiority of Modern Tragedy -- The Form of Greek Tragedy -- The Content of Greek Tragedy -- The Tragic Effect -- Kant on the Sublime -- Schelling on the Sublime -- Criticism -- 6 Hölderlin -- The Human Condition: 'Sobriety' versus 'Intoxication' -- The Modern Condition: Us versus the Greeks -- The 'Free Use' of the Apollonian -- Why We Need to Recover the Dionysian -- Dionysian Unity -- Tragedy and the Dionysian -- Criticism -- 7 Hegel -- Ethical Substance -- The Tragic Conflict -- The Tragic Hero -- The Cause of the Tragic Conflict: Hegel's Account of Hamartia -- The Tragic Resolution -- Hegel and Catharsis -- Modern Tragedy -- Fate -- Oedipus -- Agamemnon -- 'Hegelian' versus 'Fateful' Tragedy -- Is Hegel Unfair to Shakespeare? -- 8 Kierkegaard -- Modernity and Subjectivity -- The Greek Tragic Hero: Freedom, Fate, Hamartia and the Tragic Effect -- Kierkegaard versus Hegel on Greek Tragedy -- Modern Tragedy -- Rewriting Antigone -- Criticism -- 9 Schopenhauer -- Schopenhauer's General Philosophy -- What Is Art? -- The Beautiful -- The Sublime -- The Poetics of Tragedy -- Tragic Pleasure.

Fear and Pity -- Modern versus Greek Tragedy -- Criticism -- 10 Nietzsche -- The Problem: The Threat of Nihilism -- Homer's Apollonian Art -- The Apollonian Solution to Nihilism -- The Dionysian -- Tragic Joy -- How Greek Tragedy Produced Tragic Joy -- The 'Primordial Unity' as a Natural Being -- The 'Noble Deception' -- Only as an 'Aesthetic Phenomenon' Is Life 'Justified' -- Socrates and the Death of Tragedy -- Does Nietzsche Answer the Question? -- Criticism -- 11 Benjamin and Schmitt -- Tragedy versus Mourning Play -- Myth versus Current Affairs -- Moral 'Agon' versus the 'Death of Martyrs' -- Stoical versus Sublime Death -- Continuous versus Discontinuous Action -- Onstage versus Offstage Violence -- Mourning versus Fear and Pity -- Aesthetic Relativism -- The Inconsistency of the Criteria Definitive of a Mourning Play -- Mourning Play versus Martyr Play -- Is Hamlet a Mourning Play? -- Martyr Play versus Tragedy -- Schmitt -- Hamlet -- Tragedy versus Trauerspiel -- Criticism -- 12 Heidegger -- The Central Account -- Ontology and Ethics -- The Content of Tragedy -- Heidegger and Wagner -- Creation versus Articulation -- The Ister Lectures -- Criticism -- The Possibility of Modern Tragedy -- 13 Camus -- The Conditions under Which Tragedy Arises -- What Is Tragedy? -- Camus on the Tragic Effect -- The Death of Ancient and Renaissance Tragedy -- The Possibility of the Rebirth of Tragedy -- Camus and Hegel -- 14 Arthur Miller -- Is Tragedy Possible Now? -- The Tragic Hero -- The Tragic Conflict -- Hamartia -- The Tragic Effect -- Tragedy and Pessimism -- Criticism -- 15 Žižek -- What Is Tragedy? -- The Enemies of Tragedy -- Criticism -- 16 Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index.

This book, written in an accessible style, is an exhaustive survey of the philosophy of tragedy from antiquity to the present.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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