Confucianism : A Modern Interpretation.

By: Chang, Chi-YünContributor(s): Lee, OrientPublisher: Singapore : Zhejiang University Press, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Edition: 2012th edDescription: 1 online resource (508 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789814439886Subject(s): ConfucianismGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Confucianism : A Modern InterpretationDDC classification: 299.512 LOC classification: BL1853 -- .C43 2013ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Preface -- About the Authors -- Chapter 1 Confucius Was Great -- 1.1 His Great Personality -- 1.2 His Humanism -- 1.3 First Democratic Educator -- 1.4 An Accomplished Philosophical Man -- 1.5 Inauguration of a New Era -- 1.6 The Four Steps -- 1.7 Aim at the Dao -- 1. Between Heaven's way and man's way -- 2. Between mind and matter -- 3. Between knowledge and action -- 1.8 Build up a Base with Virtue -- 1.9 Rely on Ren -- 1.10 Relax in the Arts -- 1.11 Man's Mind, Nature, and Sentiments -- 1.12 Learning, Knowledge, Intuition -- 1.13 Action -- 1.14 Have a Sincere Will -- 1.15 Happiness in the Dao -- 1.16 The Middle Way -- 1. Zhong-zheng (中正), the right place -- 2. Zhong-he (中和), the right mood -- 3. Zhong-yong, the right application -- 4. Zhong-xing (中 ), the right attitude -- 5. Shi-zhong (时中), the right timing -- 1.17 To Be a Sage Inside and a King Outside -- 1.18 People Are Masters -- 1. Nationality -- 2. Democracy -- 3. Social welfare -- 1.19 Confucianism and the Idea of Revolution -- 1.20 Great Harmony -- 1.21 Lineage of Confucianism -- 1.22 A Confucianist Century for the World -- Chapter 2 Philosophy of Life -- 2.1 A Humanist Philosophy -- 2.2 Ren, a Concept Created by Confucius -- 2.3 Righteousness: Its Relationships with Ren, with Courage, with the Li, etc. -- 2.4 Filial Devotion -- 2.5 Trustworthiness -- 2.6 Loyalty and Empathy -- 2.7 Public Spirit and Straightforwardness -- 2.8 Respect and Sincerity -- 2.9 Calmness and Firmness -- 2.10 Thrift, Modesty, and Willingness to Yield -- 2.11 Seeing a Man's Merit Through His Faults -- 2.12 Overcoming One's Self in Order to Get Back to the Li -- Chapter 3 Philosophy of Education -- 3.1 The Goal of Education -- 1. Morality -- 2. Balanced intellect -- 3. Self-cultivation -- 4. Spiritual fulfillment -- 3.2 The Systems of Education -- 1. It was non-governmental.
2. It was a fully-fledged college -- 3. It was practical -- 4. It was non-discriminatory -- 3.3 Equality of Opportunity in Education, a New Trend in the 20th Century -- 3.4 National Homogeneity Through Education -- 3.5 Upholding Man's Virtuous Nature -- 3.6 Learning about the Dao Through Inquiry and Practice -- 3.7 Grasping the Vast and Big -- 3.8 Exhausting the Subtle and Abstruse -- 1. Silent absorption -- 2. Ge the things -- 3. Act with vigor -- 4. Behaving and thinking cautiously when alone -- 3.9 Textbooks and Curricula -- 3.10 Methods of Instruction -- 1. Exercise and practice -- 2. Doubting and believing -- 3. Using the correct names -- 4. Seeing unity in duality -- 5. Enlightenment -- 6. Learning to be objective -- 7. Teaching the students individually -- 3.11 The Way of a Teacher -- 1. Remaining a student after becoming a teacher -- 2. Learning through teaching -- 3. Silent teaching -- 4. Dedication -- 3.12 Friends as Teachers -- 3.13 Giving Education to More People -- 1. Giving education to children -- 2. Giving education to women -- 3. Giving education to the people in general -- 3.14 Character-Building -- Chapter 4 Political Philosophy -- 4.1 The People Are Important -- 4.2 Heaven's Mandate Is Revocable -- 4.3 Notions of Liberty and Equality -- 4.4 Governing a Country with the Li -- 4.5 Rectifying the Names -- 4.6 Politics and Education -- 4.7 Politics and Ethics -- 4.8 Administration by the Elite -- 4.9 The Way of a Statesman -- 1. He must have an inspiring personality -- 2. He must also practice empathy -- 3. He must exert himself ahead of the people and make the people exert themselves too -- 4. A statesman ought to delegate authority -- 4.10 Secrets of Efficiency -- 1. Planning -- 2. Dispatch -- 3. Review -- 4.11 The Problem of Public Opinion -- 4.12 Self-Cultivation -- 4.13 Regulation of the Family.
4.14 Self-Government on the Xiang Level -- 4.15 How to Govern a Whole Country -- 4.16 Confucianism and Dr. Sun's Three Principles -- 4.17 Pacification of the World -- 4.18 Da-tong (Great Harmony) -- Chapter 5 Philosophy of Law -- 5.1 The Place of Law in Chinese Culture -- 5.2 The Li versus the Law -- 5.3 The Three Classics on the Li -- 1. The Book of Etiquette and Ceremonial -- 2. The Rites of Zhou -- 3. The Book of Rites -- 5.4 Some Stimulating Comments on the Li -- 5.5 The Li and the Natural Law -- 5.6 The Writing and Publication of the Law -- 5.7 Applications of the Law -- 1. Release of the suspect if his guilt is not sufficiently proved -- 2. Judgment may be made in accordance with certain passages in the Confucian classics -- 3. No fondness for pronouncing death sentences -- 4. Reliability and righteousness -- 5.8 Judges -- 5.9 The Legalists -- 5.10 Some Principles in Chinese Law -- 1. Protection of the people -- 2. Separation of the civil courts from the criminal courts -- 3. Independence of the judiciary -- 4. Trials were open to the public -- 5.11 The Chinese Legal System -- Chapter 6 Philosophy of Art -- 6.1 A Country Dedicated to the Li and the Yue -- 6.2 Harmony, the Spirit of the Yue -- 6.3 Confucius the Artist -- 6.4 Songs and Dances -- 6.5 Poetics -- 6.6 Diction in Prose -- 6.7 A Further Discussion on Music -- 1. To offer a release for people's emotions -- 2. To promote unity among people -- 3. To echo Heaven and symbolize Heaven's virtues -- 6.8 Masters of the Yue -- 6.9 Musical Instruments -- 6.10 A Further Discussion on the Dance -- 6.11 Painting -- 6.12 Physical Culture -- 6.13 Living with Nature -- 6.14 Aesthetics and Education -- Chapter 7 Philosophy of Change and of History -- 7.1 Theories and Facts -- 7.2 The Book of Changes : Its Own History -- 7.3 The Yin and the Yang, the Ultimate Being, and the Ultimate Nothingness.
7.4 Change, No-Change, Simplicity -- 7.5 The Virtue of Modesty -- 7.6 Rising up from Trouble -- 7.7 Lessons from The Book of Documents -- 7.8 An Interpretation of History -- 7.9 Chun-qiu -- 7.10 Using the Right Words -- 7.11 Upholding National Unity -- 7.12 Curbing the Barbarians -- 7.13 The Three Commentaries of the Chun-qiu -- 7.14 A Great Tradition: Historians' Integrity -- Chapter 8 Military Philosophy -- 8.1 Confucius Was a Knight -- 8.2 Preparedness -- 8.3 Defense Through Virtue -- 8.4 A Ren Man Can Never Be Defeated -- 8.5 Using Kindness to Put an End to Troubles -- 8.6 A Ren Man Has to Resist Aggression -- 8.7 Wang Yi, a Boy Who Died for Lu -- 8.8 Ran Qiu, Scholar-soldier -- 8.9 Zi-gong, an Adroit Diplomat -- 8.10 Cautiousness and Careful Planning -- 8.11 Military Organization During the Middle Zhou -- 8.12 A Pact for Permanent Peace -- Chapter 9 Religious Philosophy -- 9.1 Heaven's Dao -- 9.2 Tian -- 9.3 The Orders from Heaven -- 9.4 Heaven and Man Are One -- 9.5 Reverence for Heaven and Love for Man -- 9.6 Filial Piety -- 9.7 Life and Death -- 9.8 Sacrificial Ceremonies -- 9.9 The Catholic Appraisal of China's Religious Tradition -- 9.10 Confucius Prayed -- 9.11 Is Confucianism a Religion -- 9.12 The Confucianist Motto: Be Sincere -- Chapter 10 The Model Types of Men by Confucian Standards -- 10.1 Perfection Was the Aim -- 10.2 The Ru (儒), Scholar with a Principle -- 1. How does a ru treat himself? -- 2. How does a ru treat his friends? -- 3. How does a ru treat his ruler, superior, or employer? -- 10.3 The Good Men, the Accomplished Men, and the Great Men -- 10.4 The Shi (士), Knight-Scholar with a Purpose -- 10.5 The Jun-zi (君子), Perfect Gentlemen -- 1. What a jun-zi ought to do about himself? -- 2. Contrasts between a jun-zi and a villain -- 3. How should a jun-zi treat other persons? -- 10.6 The Xian-men ( 人), the Worthy Ones.
10.7 The Sheng-men ( 人), the Sages -- 10.8 The Sages in Legendary Times -- 10.9 The Five Ren-men (仁人) of Shang -- 10.10 The Sages and the Xian-men of Early Zhou -- 10.11 Guan Zhong and Zi-chan -- 10.12 Liu-xia Hui and Qu Bo-yu -- Chapter 11 The Disciples of Confucius -- 11.1 The Number of Disciples -- 11.2 Their Geographical Origins -- 11.3 Their Years of Birth -- 11.4 The Ten Disciples with Four Kinds of Specialties -- 11.5 Yan Yuan -- 11.6 Min Zi-qian, Ran Bo-niu, and Zhong-gong -- 11.7 Zai Wo and Zi-gong -- 11.8 Ran You and Zi-lu -- 11.9 Zi-you -- 11.10 Zi-xia -- 11.11 Zeng Shen -- 11.12 Zi-zhang -- 11.13 Some Other Disciples -- 11.14 Epilogue -- Chapter 12 Confucianist Lineage -- 12.1 A Main Stream in Chinese Cultural History -- 12.2 Beginnings of Confucianism -- 12.3 The Spread of Confucianism -- 12.4 Confucianism During the Warring States Periods -- 12.5 Confucianism During the Han Dynasty -- 12.6 Confucianism During the Wei, Jin, Southern and Northern Dynasties -- 12.7 Confucianism During the Sui Dynasty -- 12.8 Confucianism During the Tang Dynasty -- 12.9 Confucianism During the Northern Song Dynasty -- 12.10 Confucianism During the Southern Song Dynasty -- 12.11 Confucianism During the Yuan Dynasty -- 12.12 Confucianism During the Ming Dynasty -- 12.13 Confucianism During the Qing Dynasty -- Chapter 13 Classics and Memorials -- 13.1 Confucius the Educator and Confucius the Author -- 13.2 The Book of Changes -- 13.3 The Book of Songs -- 13.4 The Book of Documents -- 13.5 The Chun-qiu and Its Three Commentaries -- 13.6 The Three Classics on the Li -- 13.7 The Xiao-jing -- 13.8 The Four Books -- 13.9 The Great Learning -- 13.10 The Analects -- 13.11 The Mencius -- 13.12 The Doctrine of the Mean -- 13.13 Evaluation of Ancient Texts -- 13.14 The Confucian Temple and the Confucian Forest at Qufu.
13.15 Honors and Ceremonials Conferred on Confucius and the Outstanding Confucianists.
Summary: Key Features:Dedicated to late Mr. Chang Chi-yun, a prominent historian as well as the founder of Chinese Culture UniversityIllustrates the six elements of Confucius's teachings: Philosophy of Life Ethics, Philosophy of Education, Philosophy of Creation, Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Providence and Philosophy of PeaceExplains the value and significance of Confucius's teachings and provides a modern interpretation of the teachings.
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Intro -- Contents -- Preface -- About the Authors -- Chapter 1 Confucius Was Great -- 1.1 His Great Personality -- 1.2 His Humanism -- 1.3 First Democratic Educator -- 1.4 An Accomplished Philosophical Man -- 1.5 Inauguration of a New Era -- 1.6 The Four Steps -- 1.7 Aim at the Dao -- 1. Between Heaven's way and man's way -- 2. Between mind and matter -- 3. Between knowledge and action -- 1.8 Build up a Base with Virtue -- 1.9 Rely on Ren -- 1.10 Relax in the Arts -- 1.11 Man's Mind, Nature, and Sentiments -- 1.12 Learning, Knowledge, Intuition -- 1.13 Action -- 1.14 Have a Sincere Will -- 1.15 Happiness in the Dao -- 1.16 The Middle Way -- 1. Zhong-zheng (中正), the right place -- 2. Zhong-he (中和), the right mood -- 3. Zhong-yong, the right application -- 4. Zhong-xing (中 ), the right attitude -- 5. Shi-zhong (时中), the right timing -- 1.17 To Be a Sage Inside and a King Outside -- 1.18 People Are Masters -- 1. Nationality -- 2. Democracy -- 3. Social welfare -- 1.19 Confucianism and the Idea of Revolution -- 1.20 Great Harmony -- 1.21 Lineage of Confucianism -- 1.22 A Confucianist Century for the World -- Chapter 2 Philosophy of Life -- 2.1 A Humanist Philosophy -- 2.2 Ren, a Concept Created by Confucius -- 2.3 Righteousness: Its Relationships with Ren, with Courage, with the Li, etc. -- 2.4 Filial Devotion -- 2.5 Trustworthiness -- 2.6 Loyalty and Empathy -- 2.7 Public Spirit and Straightforwardness -- 2.8 Respect and Sincerity -- 2.9 Calmness and Firmness -- 2.10 Thrift, Modesty, and Willingness to Yield -- 2.11 Seeing a Man's Merit Through His Faults -- 2.12 Overcoming One's Self in Order to Get Back to the Li -- Chapter 3 Philosophy of Education -- 3.1 The Goal of Education -- 1. Morality -- 2. Balanced intellect -- 3. Self-cultivation -- 4. Spiritual fulfillment -- 3.2 The Systems of Education -- 1. It was non-governmental.

2. It was a fully-fledged college -- 3. It was practical -- 4. It was non-discriminatory -- 3.3 Equality of Opportunity in Education, a New Trend in the 20th Century -- 3.4 National Homogeneity Through Education -- 3.5 Upholding Man's Virtuous Nature -- 3.6 Learning about the Dao Through Inquiry and Practice -- 3.7 Grasping the Vast and Big -- 3.8 Exhausting the Subtle and Abstruse -- 1. Silent absorption -- 2. Ge the things -- 3. Act with vigor -- 4. Behaving and thinking cautiously when alone -- 3.9 Textbooks and Curricula -- 3.10 Methods of Instruction -- 1. Exercise and practice -- 2. Doubting and believing -- 3. Using the correct names -- 4. Seeing unity in duality -- 5. Enlightenment -- 6. Learning to be objective -- 7. Teaching the students individually -- 3.11 The Way of a Teacher -- 1. Remaining a student after becoming a teacher -- 2. Learning through teaching -- 3. Silent teaching -- 4. Dedication -- 3.12 Friends as Teachers -- 3.13 Giving Education to More People -- 1. Giving education to children -- 2. Giving education to women -- 3. Giving education to the people in general -- 3.14 Character-Building -- Chapter 4 Political Philosophy -- 4.1 The People Are Important -- 4.2 Heaven's Mandate Is Revocable -- 4.3 Notions of Liberty and Equality -- 4.4 Governing a Country with the Li -- 4.5 Rectifying the Names -- 4.6 Politics and Education -- 4.7 Politics and Ethics -- 4.8 Administration by the Elite -- 4.9 The Way of a Statesman -- 1. He must have an inspiring personality -- 2. He must also practice empathy -- 3. He must exert himself ahead of the people and make the people exert themselves too -- 4. A statesman ought to delegate authority -- 4.10 Secrets of Efficiency -- 1. Planning -- 2. Dispatch -- 3. Review -- 4.11 The Problem of Public Opinion -- 4.12 Self-Cultivation -- 4.13 Regulation of the Family.

4.14 Self-Government on the Xiang Level -- 4.15 How to Govern a Whole Country -- 4.16 Confucianism and Dr. Sun's Three Principles -- 4.17 Pacification of the World -- 4.18 Da-tong (Great Harmony) -- Chapter 5 Philosophy of Law -- 5.1 The Place of Law in Chinese Culture -- 5.2 The Li versus the Law -- 5.3 The Three Classics on the Li -- 1. The Book of Etiquette and Ceremonial -- 2. The Rites of Zhou -- 3. The Book of Rites -- 5.4 Some Stimulating Comments on the Li -- 5.5 The Li and the Natural Law -- 5.6 The Writing and Publication of the Law -- 5.7 Applications of the Law -- 1. Release of the suspect if his guilt is not sufficiently proved -- 2. Judgment may be made in accordance with certain passages in the Confucian classics -- 3. No fondness for pronouncing death sentences -- 4. Reliability and righteousness -- 5.8 Judges -- 5.9 The Legalists -- 5.10 Some Principles in Chinese Law -- 1. Protection of the people -- 2. Separation of the civil courts from the criminal courts -- 3. Independence of the judiciary -- 4. Trials were open to the public -- 5.11 The Chinese Legal System -- Chapter 6 Philosophy of Art -- 6.1 A Country Dedicated to the Li and the Yue -- 6.2 Harmony, the Spirit of the Yue -- 6.3 Confucius the Artist -- 6.4 Songs and Dances -- 6.5 Poetics -- 6.6 Diction in Prose -- 6.7 A Further Discussion on Music -- 1. To offer a release for people's emotions -- 2. To promote unity among people -- 3. To echo Heaven and symbolize Heaven's virtues -- 6.8 Masters of the Yue -- 6.9 Musical Instruments -- 6.10 A Further Discussion on the Dance -- 6.11 Painting -- 6.12 Physical Culture -- 6.13 Living with Nature -- 6.14 Aesthetics and Education -- Chapter 7 Philosophy of Change and of History -- 7.1 Theories and Facts -- 7.2 The Book of Changes : Its Own History -- 7.3 The Yin and the Yang, the Ultimate Being, and the Ultimate Nothingness.

7.4 Change, No-Change, Simplicity -- 7.5 The Virtue of Modesty -- 7.6 Rising up from Trouble -- 7.7 Lessons from The Book of Documents -- 7.8 An Interpretation of History -- 7.9 Chun-qiu -- 7.10 Using the Right Words -- 7.11 Upholding National Unity -- 7.12 Curbing the Barbarians -- 7.13 The Three Commentaries of the Chun-qiu -- 7.14 A Great Tradition: Historians' Integrity -- Chapter 8 Military Philosophy -- 8.1 Confucius Was a Knight -- 8.2 Preparedness -- 8.3 Defense Through Virtue -- 8.4 A Ren Man Can Never Be Defeated -- 8.5 Using Kindness to Put an End to Troubles -- 8.6 A Ren Man Has to Resist Aggression -- 8.7 Wang Yi, a Boy Who Died for Lu -- 8.8 Ran Qiu, Scholar-soldier -- 8.9 Zi-gong, an Adroit Diplomat -- 8.10 Cautiousness and Careful Planning -- 8.11 Military Organization During the Middle Zhou -- 8.12 A Pact for Permanent Peace -- Chapter 9 Religious Philosophy -- 9.1 Heaven's Dao -- 9.2 Tian -- 9.3 The Orders from Heaven -- 9.4 Heaven and Man Are One -- 9.5 Reverence for Heaven and Love for Man -- 9.6 Filial Piety -- 9.7 Life and Death -- 9.8 Sacrificial Ceremonies -- 9.9 The Catholic Appraisal of China's Religious Tradition -- 9.10 Confucius Prayed -- 9.11 Is Confucianism a Religion -- 9.12 The Confucianist Motto: Be Sincere -- Chapter 10 The Model Types of Men by Confucian Standards -- 10.1 Perfection Was the Aim -- 10.2 The Ru (儒), Scholar with a Principle -- 1. How does a ru treat himself? -- 2. How does a ru treat his friends? -- 3. How does a ru treat his ruler, superior, or employer? -- 10.3 The Good Men, the Accomplished Men, and the Great Men -- 10.4 The Shi (士), Knight-Scholar with a Purpose -- 10.5 The Jun-zi (君子), Perfect Gentlemen -- 1. What a jun-zi ought to do about himself? -- 2. Contrasts between a jun-zi and a villain -- 3. How should a jun-zi treat other persons? -- 10.6 The Xian-men ( 人), the Worthy Ones.

10.7 The Sheng-men ( 人), the Sages -- 10.8 The Sages in Legendary Times -- 10.9 The Five Ren-men (仁人) of Shang -- 10.10 The Sages and the Xian-men of Early Zhou -- 10.11 Guan Zhong and Zi-chan -- 10.12 Liu-xia Hui and Qu Bo-yu -- Chapter 11 The Disciples of Confucius -- 11.1 The Number of Disciples -- 11.2 Their Geographical Origins -- 11.3 Their Years of Birth -- 11.4 The Ten Disciples with Four Kinds of Specialties -- 11.5 Yan Yuan -- 11.6 Min Zi-qian, Ran Bo-niu, and Zhong-gong -- 11.7 Zai Wo and Zi-gong -- 11.8 Ran You and Zi-lu -- 11.9 Zi-you -- 11.10 Zi-xia -- 11.11 Zeng Shen -- 11.12 Zi-zhang -- 11.13 Some Other Disciples -- 11.14 Epilogue -- Chapter 12 Confucianist Lineage -- 12.1 A Main Stream in Chinese Cultural History -- 12.2 Beginnings of Confucianism -- 12.3 The Spread of Confucianism -- 12.4 Confucianism During the Warring States Periods -- 12.5 Confucianism During the Han Dynasty -- 12.6 Confucianism During the Wei, Jin, Southern and Northern Dynasties -- 12.7 Confucianism During the Sui Dynasty -- 12.8 Confucianism During the Tang Dynasty -- 12.9 Confucianism During the Northern Song Dynasty -- 12.10 Confucianism During the Southern Song Dynasty -- 12.11 Confucianism During the Yuan Dynasty -- 12.12 Confucianism During the Ming Dynasty -- 12.13 Confucianism During the Qing Dynasty -- Chapter 13 Classics and Memorials -- 13.1 Confucius the Educator and Confucius the Author -- 13.2 The Book of Changes -- 13.3 The Book of Songs -- 13.4 The Book of Documents -- 13.5 The Chun-qiu and Its Three Commentaries -- 13.6 The Three Classics on the Li -- 13.7 The Xiao-jing -- 13.8 The Four Books -- 13.9 The Great Learning -- 13.10 The Analects -- 13.11 The Mencius -- 13.12 The Doctrine of the Mean -- 13.13 Evaluation of Ancient Texts -- 13.14 The Confucian Temple and the Confucian Forest at Qufu.

13.15 Honors and Ceremonials Conferred on Confucius and the Outstanding Confucianists.

Key Features:Dedicated to late Mr. Chang Chi-yun, a prominent historian as well as the founder of Chinese Culture UniversityIllustrates the six elements of Confucius's teachings: Philosophy of Life Ethics, Philosophy of Education, Philosophy of Creation, Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Providence and Philosophy of PeaceExplains the value and significance of Confucius's teachings and provides a modern interpretation of the teachings.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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