Iconic Investigations.

By: Elleström, LarsContributor(s): Fischer, Olga | Ljungberg, ChristinaSeries: Iconicity in Language and LiteraturePublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (367 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027272232Subject(s): Software engineering -- Congresses.;Computer software -- Quality control -- Congresses.;Computer software -- Development -- Congresses.;Software measurement -- CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Iconic InvestigationsDDC classification: 401/.4 LOC classification: P99.4.I26 -- I33 2013ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Iconic Investigations -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- List of contributors -- Introduction -- References -- Part I. Iconicity and conceptualization -- Iconicity by blending -- 1. From similarity to blending -- 2. From blending to similarity -- 3. Conclusion -- References -- The Bashō code -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Texts -- 2.1 The frog poem -- 2.2 The cicada poem -- 3. Semantic and thematic similarity -- 3.1 Frog and cicada: Initiators of the 'sound' of nature -- 3.2 A new meaning of silence -- 3.3 Exterior lines -- 4. Similarities in the revising process -- 5. Syntactic similarity -- 5.1 A - B - A structure -- 5.2 Kireji and syntactic loosening -- 5.3 A-B-A structure with a compound verb in the middle -- 6. Phonological similarity -- 6.1 Shared morae patterns -- 6.2 Shared morae: [ka-wa-zu] ('frog') -- 6.3 Shared morae: [mi-zu]('water') -- 6.4 Shared morae: [i-wa] ('rock') -- 6.5 Shared morae: [i-ru]('enter') -- 6.6 Doubled morae: [zu],[to] and [shi], [mi] -- 7. Discussion -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Iconicity in gotoochi-kitii 'localized Hello Kitty' -- 1. Introduction -- 2. 'Kitty' in the compound noun gotoochi-kitii and 'Hello Kitty' -- 3. Three factors of diversification -- 3.1 On the term gotoochi '(your) local area' -- 3.2 Blending gotoochi and Kitty -- 3.2.1 The Agent-Undergoer continuum -- 3.3 Kitty neutralized -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Grammar-internal mimicking and analogy -- 1. Mimicking -- 2. Disrupted inflection and mimicking -- 3. Mimicking in compounding and derivation -- 4. Syntax to syntax mimicking -- 5. Analogy and mimicking compared -- References -- To draw a bow 引 -- 1. Introduction 入 -- 2. Theoretical insights -- 3. To draw a bow 引 -- References -- Spatiotemporal aspects of iconicity -- 1. Multimodal iconicity -- 2. Image, diagram, and metaphor.
3. Spatiotemporal aspects of iconicity -- References -- Part II. Visual iconicity -- From diagrams to poetry -- 1. Introduction: Peircean iconicity -- 2. Diagrammatical reasoning -- 3. Klaus Høeck's elaboration of diagram poetry -- The cutting out of a poetic surface of assertion -- Graphic shape mirroring object shape -- Vertical - horizontal depiction -- Self-reference -- Paths describing themselves -- 4. Sequence experimenting and diagrammatical reasoning -- References -- The iconized letter -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The context -- 3. Lettrisme's iconized letters -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- The semantics of structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. E. E. Cummings: The hidden sonnet -- 3. William Carlos Williams: Image vs. metaphor -- References -- Visual iconicity in Latin poetry -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Ancient testimonies on iconicity -- 3. A semiotic equivalence: Long line and framing hyperbaton -- 3.1 Statistical evidence -- 4. Enclosing word order indicating length -- 4.1 'Snake' lines -- 4.2 Weapons: Swords, spears, arrows and javelins -- 4.3 Lines containing the flow of rivers and streams -- 5. Enclosing word order used for centering, containment and enclosure -- 5.1 The icon of enclosure and cover -- 5.2 The icon of winding, containing, encirclement -- 6. Some further types of word order icons -- 6.1 'Spatial hyperbaton' -- 6.2 Icon of percolation or passing through: (↑) -- 6.3 Icon of separation or opposition -- 6.4 The abAB type: An icon of 'mixture' -- 7. Concluding remarks -- References -- Shared and direct experiential iconicity in digital reading games -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Terminology -- 3. Case study: Examples of shared experiential iconicity in the adapted narrative of Carroll's (1865) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in Weir's (2009) Silent Conversation -- 3.1 Game mechanics.
3.2 Analysis of examples of shared experiential iconicity in the adaptation of Carroll's (1865) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Further research -- 6. Concluding remarks -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Iconicity, intermediality, and interpersonal meanings in a Social Semiotic Space -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A written interactive context -- 3. Some markers of mediated context of interaction -- 4. 'Process-sharing' in a mediated context -- 5. Abbreviations and initialisms as iconic and indexical -- 6. Mediated interactivity markers -- 7. Emoticons -- 8. Summary and conclusion -- References -- Model and icon -- 1. Model as icon and index -- 2. The mirror analogy -- 3. Modernism and the model -- 4. Art as communication -- 5. The return of the model and beauty -- 6. Role reversals and collaborations -- 7. The model and interactive beauty -- References -- Degrees of indetermination in intersemiotic translation -- 1. Intersemiotic translation -- 2. Levels of pertinence, equivalence and translatability -- 3. Degrees of indeterminacy -- 3.1 Between the verbal and the iconic -- 4. The finale of Smoke -- 5. Concluding remarks -- References -- Part III. Auditory iconicity -- Sound, image and fake realism -- 1. Reading grids and impression of likeness -- 2. Wall-e: Sound figures between human and non-human -- 3. Last Days: strategies of dissociation between visual and sound narrations -- 4. Paranoid Park: fake realism and sound-based mise-en-abyme -- 5. Sound figures and surrogate stimuli -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Opera, oratorio, and iconic strategies -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Italian drama -- 3. Opera and oratorio -- 4. The libretto -- 5. The Italian opera -- 6. Iconic strategies in recitatives and arias -- 7. Operatic iconicity as a mirror of human fears and desires -- References -- Appendix 1 -- Appendix 2 -- Appendix 3.
On some iconic strategies in concept albums within the Italian singer-songwriter tradition -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Imagic iconicity. Simulation of explosions: The motif of the bomb -- 3. The iconic value of the musical theme and its variations as a modular tale -- 3.1 La bomba in testa -- 3.2 Il bombarolo -- 3.3 Nella mia ora di libertà -- 4. The musical theme as a container of stories: The theme of alternation -- 5. Il giorno aveva cinque teste -- 5.1 'La bambina (l'inverno è neve, l'estate è sole)'. The instruments of power: The rapid and cyclical nature of time perception in neo-capitalist society -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Discography -- Iconically expressible meanings in Proto-Indo-European roots and their reflexes in daughter branches -- 1. Introduction -- 2. PIE roots and their structure -- 3. Reduplication -- 4. Concluding remarks -- Acknowledgements -- Symbols and Abbreviations -- Dictionaries -- References -- The lexical iconicity hierarchy and its grammatical correlates -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Linguistic iconicity -- 3. Lexical availability -- 4. Morphophonology -- 4.1 Root length -- 4.2 Flexibility/Templaticity -- 4.3 Phoneme distribution -- 4.4 Orthography -- 5. Syntax -- 6. Semantics -- 7. Lexical acquisition -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Author index -- Subject index.
Summary: This paper proposes an integrated account of the formal and functional non-uniformity exhibited by sound-symbolic words based on a hierarchy of lexical iconicity (i.e., iconicity of words). It is argued that the more iconic a vocalized sign is, the less strongly it is constrained by the linguistic system. This crosslinguistic generalization is instantiated by the lexical availability, morphophonology, syntax, semantics, and acquisition of sound-symbolic words.
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Iconic Investigations -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- List of contributors -- Introduction -- References -- Part I. Iconicity and conceptualization -- Iconicity by blending -- 1. From similarity to blending -- 2. From blending to similarity -- 3. Conclusion -- References -- The Bashō code -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Texts -- 2.1 The frog poem -- 2.2 The cicada poem -- 3. Semantic and thematic similarity -- 3.1 Frog and cicada: Initiators of the 'sound' of nature -- 3.2 A new meaning of silence -- 3.3 Exterior lines -- 4. Similarities in the revising process -- 5. Syntactic similarity -- 5.1 A - B - A structure -- 5.2 Kireji and syntactic loosening -- 5.3 A-B-A structure with a compound verb in the middle -- 6. Phonological similarity -- 6.1 Shared morae patterns -- 6.2 Shared morae: [ka-wa-zu] ('frog') -- 6.3 Shared morae: [mi-zu]('water') -- 6.4 Shared morae: [i-wa] ('rock') -- 6.5 Shared morae: [i-ru]('enter') -- 6.6 Doubled morae: [zu],[to] and [shi], [mi] -- 7. Discussion -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Iconicity in gotoochi-kitii 'localized Hello Kitty' -- 1. Introduction -- 2. 'Kitty' in the compound noun gotoochi-kitii and 'Hello Kitty' -- 3. Three factors of diversification -- 3.1 On the term gotoochi '(your) local area' -- 3.2 Blending gotoochi and Kitty -- 3.2.1 The Agent-Undergoer continuum -- 3.3 Kitty neutralized -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Grammar-internal mimicking and analogy -- 1. Mimicking -- 2. Disrupted inflection and mimicking -- 3. Mimicking in compounding and derivation -- 4. Syntax to syntax mimicking -- 5. Analogy and mimicking compared -- References -- To draw a bow 引 -- 1. Introduction 入 -- 2. Theoretical insights -- 3. To draw a bow 引 -- References -- Spatiotemporal aspects of iconicity -- 1. Multimodal iconicity -- 2. Image, diagram, and metaphor.

3. Spatiotemporal aspects of iconicity -- References -- Part II. Visual iconicity -- From diagrams to poetry -- 1. Introduction: Peircean iconicity -- 2. Diagrammatical reasoning -- 3. Klaus Høeck's elaboration of diagram poetry -- The cutting out of a poetic surface of assertion -- Graphic shape mirroring object shape -- Vertical - horizontal depiction -- Self-reference -- Paths describing themselves -- 4. Sequence experimenting and diagrammatical reasoning -- References -- The iconized letter -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The context -- 3. Lettrisme's iconized letters -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- The semantics of structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. E. E. Cummings: The hidden sonnet -- 3. William Carlos Williams: Image vs. metaphor -- References -- Visual iconicity in Latin poetry -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Ancient testimonies on iconicity -- 3. A semiotic equivalence: Long line and framing hyperbaton -- 3.1 Statistical evidence -- 4. Enclosing word order indicating length -- 4.1 'Snake' lines -- 4.2 Weapons: Swords, spears, arrows and javelins -- 4.3 Lines containing the flow of rivers and streams -- 5. Enclosing word order used for centering, containment and enclosure -- 5.1 The icon of enclosure and cover -- 5.2 The icon of winding, containing, encirclement -- 6. Some further types of word order icons -- 6.1 'Spatial hyperbaton' -- 6.2 Icon of percolation or passing through: (↑) -- 6.3 Icon of separation or opposition -- 6.4 The abAB type: An icon of 'mixture' -- 7. Concluding remarks -- References -- Shared and direct experiential iconicity in digital reading games -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Terminology -- 3. Case study: Examples of shared experiential iconicity in the adapted narrative of Carroll's (1865) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in Weir's (2009) Silent Conversation -- 3.1 Game mechanics.

3.2 Analysis of examples of shared experiential iconicity in the adaptation of Carroll's (1865) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Further research -- 6. Concluding remarks -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Iconicity, intermediality, and interpersonal meanings in a Social Semiotic Space -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A written interactive context -- 3. Some markers of mediated context of interaction -- 4. 'Process-sharing' in a mediated context -- 5. Abbreviations and initialisms as iconic and indexical -- 6. Mediated interactivity markers -- 7. Emoticons -- 8. Summary and conclusion -- References -- Model and icon -- 1. Model as icon and index -- 2. The mirror analogy -- 3. Modernism and the model -- 4. Art as communication -- 5. The return of the model and beauty -- 6. Role reversals and collaborations -- 7. The model and interactive beauty -- References -- Degrees of indetermination in intersemiotic translation -- 1. Intersemiotic translation -- 2. Levels of pertinence, equivalence and translatability -- 3. Degrees of indeterminacy -- 3.1 Between the verbal and the iconic -- 4. The finale of Smoke -- 5. Concluding remarks -- References -- Part III. Auditory iconicity -- Sound, image and fake realism -- 1. Reading grids and impression of likeness -- 2. Wall-e: Sound figures between human and non-human -- 3. Last Days: strategies of dissociation between visual and sound narrations -- 4. Paranoid Park: fake realism and sound-based mise-en-abyme -- 5. Sound figures and surrogate stimuli -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Opera, oratorio, and iconic strategies -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Italian drama -- 3. Opera and oratorio -- 4. The libretto -- 5. The Italian opera -- 6. Iconic strategies in recitatives and arias -- 7. Operatic iconicity as a mirror of human fears and desires -- References -- Appendix 1 -- Appendix 2 -- Appendix 3.

On some iconic strategies in concept albums within the Italian singer-songwriter tradition -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Imagic iconicity. Simulation of explosions: The motif of the bomb -- 3. The iconic value of the musical theme and its variations as a modular tale -- 3.1 La bomba in testa -- 3.2 Il bombarolo -- 3.3 Nella mia ora di libertà -- 4. The musical theme as a container of stories: The theme of alternation -- 5. Il giorno aveva cinque teste -- 5.1 'La bambina (l'inverno è neve, l'estate è sole)'. The instruments of power: The rapid and cyclical nature of time perception in neo-capitalist society -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Discography -- Iconically expressible meanings in Proto-Indo-European roots and their reflexes in daughter branches -- 1. Introduction -- 2. PIE roots and their structure -- 3. Reduplication -- 4. Concluding remarks -- Acknowledgements -- Symbols and Abbreviations -- Dictionaries -- References -- The lexical iconicity hierarchy and its grammatical correlates -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Linguistic iconicity -- 3. Lexical availability -- 4. Morphophonology -- 4.1 Root length -- 4.2 Flexibility/Templaticity -- 4.3 Phoneme distribution -- 4.4 Orthography -- 5. Syntax -- 6. Semantics -- 7. Lexical acquisition -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Author index -- Subject index.

This paper proposes an integrated account of the formal and functional non-uniformity exhibited by sound-symbolic words based on a hierarchy of lexical iconicity (i.e., iconicity of words). It is argued that the more iconic a vocalized sign is, the less strongly it is constrained by the linguistic system. This crosslinguistic generalization is instantiated by the lexical availability, morphophonology, syntax, semantics, and acquisition of sound-symbolic words.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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