Contributions to Philosophy : (Of the Event).

By: Heidegger, MartinContributor(s): Rojcewicz, Richard | Vallega-Neu, DanielaSeries: Studies in Continental Thought SerPublisher: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, 2012Copyright date: ©2012Description: 1 online resource (452 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780253001276Subject(s): PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Contributions to Philosophy : (Of the Event)DDC classification: 193 LOC classification: B3279.H48B44513 2012Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Translators' Introduction -- I. Prospect -- The official title: Contributions to Philosophy and the essential rubric: Of the Event -- 1. These "contributions" question along a way… -- 2. The saying of the event as the first answering of the question of being -- 3. Of the event -- 4. Of the event -- 5. For the few-For the rare -- 6. The basic disposition -- 7. Of the event -- 8. Of the event -- 9. Conspectus -- 10. Of the event -- 11. Event-Dasein-the human being -- 12. Event and history -- 13. Restraint -- 14. Philosophy and worldview -- 15. Philosophy as "philosophy of a people -- 16. Philosophy -- 17. The necessity of philosophy -- 18. The powerlessness of thinking -- 19. Philosophy (On the question: Who are we?) -- 20. The beginning and inceptual thinking -- 21. Inceptual thinking (Projection) -- 22. Inceptual thinking -- 23. Inceptual thinking. Why thinking out of the beginning? -- 24. The aberrant demand placed on inceptual thinking -- 25. Historicality and being -- 26. Philosophy as knowledge -- 27. Inceptual thinking (Concept) -- 28. The immeasurableness of inceptual thinking as finite thinking -- 29. Inceptual thinking (The question of the essence) -- 30. Inceptual thinking (as meditation) -- 31. The style of inceptual thinking -- 32. The event. A decisive gaze after the carrying out of the resonating and the interplay -- 33. The question of beyng -- 34. The event and the question of being -- 35. The event -- 36. Language and the inventive thinking of beyng -- 37. Beyng and its bearing silence (Sigetics) -- 38. Bearing silence -- 39. The event -- 40. The work of thought in the age of transition -- 41. Every saying of beyng is couched in words and namings -- 42. From "Being and Time" to "Event -- 43. Beyng and decision -- 44. "Decisions -- 45. The "decision.
46. The decision (Preliminary concept) -- 47. The essence of the decision: being or nonbeing -- 48. In what sense the decision belongs to beyng itself -- 49. Why must decisions take place? -- II. The Resonating -- 50. Resonating -- 51. The resonating -- 52. The abandonment by being -- 53. Plight -- 54. The abandonment by being -- 55. Resonating -- 56. The continuance of the abandonment by being in the hidden mode of the forgottenness of being -- 57. The history of beyng and the abandonment by being -- 58. The three ways the abandonment by being cloaks itself: What they are and how they appear -- 59. Bewitchery and the era of complete unquestionableness -- 60. Whence the lack of a sense of plight as the greatest plight? -- 61. Machination -- 62. The disguising of the abandonment by being through machination and "lived experience," a disguising which belongs to that abandonment itself -- 63. Lived experience -- 64. Machination -- 65. The distorted essence of beyng -- 66. Machination and lived experience -- 67. Machination and lived experience -- 68. Machination and lived experience -- 69. Lived experience and "anthropology -- 70. The gigantic -- 71. The gigantic -- 72. Nihilism -- 73. "Science" and the abandonment by being -- 74. "Total mobilization" as a consequence of the original abandonment by being -- 75. Concerning the meditation on science -- 76. Propositions about "science -- 77. Experiri-experientia-experimentum-"experimentation"-[omitted]-experience-test -- 78. Experiri [omitted]-"experiencing -- 79. Exact science and experimentation -- 80. Experiri-experientia-experimentum-"experimentation -- III. The Interplay -- 81. Interplay -- 82. Interplay -- 83. Being, according to all metaphysics -- 84. Beings -- 85. The originary appropriation of the first beginning means gaining a foothold in the other beginning.
86. What the history of metaphysics provides and thus passes on as still implicit and as unknown to this history -- 87. The history of the first beginning (the history of metaphysics) -- 88. The "historical" lecture courses belong in the sphere of this task -- 89. The transition to the other beginning -- 90. From the first to the other beginning. Negation -- 91. From the first to the other beginning -- 92. The confrontation between the first and the other beginning -- 93. The great philosophies -- 94. The confrontation of the other beginning -- 95. The first beginning -- 96. The inceptual interpretation of beings as [omitted] -- 97. [omitted] -- 98. The projection of beingness upon constant presence -- 99. "Being" and " becoming" in inceptual thinking -- 100. The first beginning -- 101. From early on, the great simplicity … -- 102. Thinking: The guideline of the guiding question of Western philosophy -- 103. On the concept of German Idealism -- 104. German Idealism -- 105. Hölderlin-Kierkegaard-Nietzsche -- 106. The decision with regard to all "ontology" in carrying out the confrontation between the first and the other beginning -- 107. The answer to the guiding question and the form of traditional metaphysics -- 108. The basic metaphysical positions within the history of the guiding question and their respective interpretations of time-space -- 109. [omitted] -- 110. The [omitted], Platonism, and idealism -- 111. The "apriori" and [omitted] -- 112. The "apriori -- 113. [omitted] and [omitted] -- 114. On Nietzsche's basic metaphysical position -- IV. The Leap -- 115. The disposition guiding the leap -- 116. The history of being -- 117. The leap -- 118. The leap -- 119. The leap is prepared by asking the basic question -- 120. The leap -- 121. Beyng and beings -- 122. The leap (the thrown projection) -- 123. Beyng -- 124. The leap.
125. Beyng and time -- 126. Beyng, beings, and the gods -- 127. The fissure -- 128. Beyng and the human being -- 129. Nothingness -- 130. The "essence" of beyng -- 131. The excess in the essence of beyng (self-concealment) -- 132. Beyng and beings -- 133. The essence of beyng -- 134. The relation between Da-sein and beyng -- 135. The essential occurrence of beyng as event (the relation between Da-sein and beyng) -- 136. Beyng -- 137. Beyng -- 138. The truth of beyng and the understanding of being -- 139. The essential occurrence of beyng: Truth and time-space -- 140. The essential occurrence of beyng -- 141. The essence of beyng -- 142. The essence of beyng -- 143. Beyng -- 144. Beyng and the original strife (beyng or non-beyng in the essence of beyng itself) -- 145. Beyng and nothingness -- 146. Beyng and non-beyng -- 147. The essential occurrence of beyng (the finitude of beyng) -- 148. Beings are -- 149. The beingness of beings distinguished according to [omitted] and [omitted] -- 150. The origin of the distinction between what a being is and the fact that it is -- 151. Being and beings -- 152. The levels of beyng -- 153. Life -- 154. "Life -- 155. Nature and earth -- 156. The fissure -- 157. The fissure and the "modalities -- 158. The fissure and the "modalities -- 159. The fissure -- 160. Being-toward-death and being -- 161. Being-toward-death -- 162. Beyng-toward-death -- 163. Being-toward-death and being -- 164. The essential occurrence of beyng -- 165. Essence as essential occurrence -- 166. Essential occurrence and essence -- 167. Entering into the essential occurrence -- V. The Grounding -- a) Da-sein and the projection of being -- 168. Da-sein and beyng -- 169. Da-sein -- 170. Da-sein -- 171. Da-sein -- 172. Da-sein and the question of being -- 173. Da-sein -- 174. Da-sein and steadfastness -- 175. Da-sein and beings as a whole.
176. Da-sein. Clarification of the word -- 177. Being-away -- 178. "Da-sein exists for the sake of itself -- 179. "Existence" (Being and Time, [German] p. 42) -- 180. Beyng and the understanding of being -- 181. The leap -- 182. The projection of beyng. The projection as thrown -- 183. The projection upon beyng -- 184. The question of being as the question of the truth of beyng -- 185. What does Da-sein mean? -- 186. Da-sein -- b) Da-sein -- 187. The grounding -- 188. The grounding -- 189. Da-sein -- 190. Of Da-sein -- 191. Da-sein -- 192. Da-sein -- 193. Da-sein and the human being -- 194. The human being and Da-sein -- 195. Da-sein and the human being -- 196. Da-sein and a people -- 197. Da-sein-domain of what is proper-selfhood -- 198. The grounding of Da-sein as a creative grounding -- 199. Transcendence, Da-sein, and beyng -- 200. Da-sein -- 201. Da-sein and being-away -- 202. Da-sein (Being-away) -- 203. The projection and Da-sein -- c) The essence of truth -- 204. The essence of truth -- 205. The open -- 206. From [omitted] to Da-sein -- 207. From [omitted] to Da-sein -- 208. Truth -- 209. [omitted]-openness and the clearing of what is self-concealing -- 210. Concerning the history of the essence of truth -- 211. [omitted] The crisis of its history in Plato and Aristotle, its last glimmering and complete collapse -- 212. Truth as certainty -- 213. What the question of truth is about -- 214. The essence of truth (Openness) -- 215. The essential occurrence of truth -- 216. The posing of the question of truth -- 217. The essence of truth -- 218. The indication of the essential occurrence of truth -- 219. The conjuncture of the question of truth -- 220. The question of truth -- 221. Truth as the essential occurrence of beyng -- 222. Truth -- 223. The essence of truth (the distorted essence of truth) -- 224. The essence of truth.
225. The essence of truth.
Summary: Martin Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy reflects his famous philosophical "turning." In this work, Heidegger returns to the question of being from its inception in Being and Time to a new questioning of being as event. Heidegger opens up the essential dimensions of his thinking on the historicality of being that underlies all of his later writings. Contributions was composed as a series of private ponderings that were not originally intended for publication. They are nonlinear and radically at odds with the traditional understanding of thinking. This translation presents Heidegger in plain and straightforward terms, allowing surer access to this new turn in Heidegger's conception of being.
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Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Translators' Introduction -- I. Prospect -- The official title: Contributions to Philosophy and the essential rubric: Of the Event -- 1. These "contributions" question along a way… -- 2. The saying of the event as the first answering of the question of being -- 3. Of the event -- 4. Of the event -- 5. For the few-For the rare -- 6. The basic disposition -- 7. Of the event -- 8. Of the event -- 9. Conspectus -- 10. Of the event -- 11. Event-Dasein-the human being -- 12. Event and history -- 13. Restraint -- 14. Philosophy and worldview -- 15. Philosophy as "philosophy of a people -- 16. Philosophy -- 17. The necessity of philosophy -- 18. The powerlessness of thinking -- 19. Philosophy (On the question: Who are we?) -- 20. The beginning and inceptual thinking -- 21. Inceptual thinking (Projection) -- 22. Inceptual thinking -- 23. Inceptual thinking. Why thinking out of the beginning? -- 24. The aberrant demand placed on inceptual thinking -- 25. Historicality and being -- 26. Philosophy as knowledge -- 27. Inceptual thinking (Concept) -- 28. The immeasurableness of inceptual thinking as finite thinking -- 29. Inceptual thinking (The question of the essence) -- 30. Inceptual thinking (as meditation) -- 31. The style of inceptual thinking -- 32. The event. A decisive gaze after the carrying out of the resonating and the interplay -- 33. The question of beyng -- 34. The event and the question of being -- 35. The event -- 36. Language and the inventive thinking of beyng -- 37. Beyng and its bearing silence (Sigetics) -- 38. Bearing silence -- 39. The event -- 40. The work of thought in the age of transition -- 41. Every saying of beyng is couched in words and namings -- 42. From "Being and Time" to "Event -- 43. Beyng and decision -- 44. "Decisions -- 45. The "decision.

46. The decision (Preliminary concept) -- 47. The essence of the decision: being or nonbeing -- 48. In what sense the decision belongs to beyng itself -- 49. Why must decisions take place? -- II. The Resonating -- 50. Resonating -- 51. The resonating -- 52. The abandonment by being -- 53. Plight -- 54. The abandonment by being -- 55. Resonating -- 56. The continuance of the abandonment by being in the hidden mode of the forgottenness of being -- 57. The history of beyng and the abandonment by being -- 58. The three ways the abandonment by being cloaks itself: What they are and how they appear -- 59. Bewitchery and the era of complete unquestionableness -- 60. Whence the lack of a sense of plight as the greatest plight? -- 61. Machination -- 62. The disguising of the abandonment by being through machination and "lived experience," a disguising which belongs to that abandonment itself -- 63. Lived experience -- 64. Machination -- 65. The distorted essence of beyng -- 66. Machination and lived experience -- 67. Machination and lived experience -- 68. Machination and lived experience -- 69. Lived experience and "anthropology -- 70. The gigantic -- 71. The gigantic -- 72. Nihilism -- 73. "Science" and the abandonment by being -- 74. "Total mobilization" as a consequence of the original abandonment by being -- 75. Concerning the meditation on science -- 76. Propositions about "science -- 77. Experiri-experientia-experimentum-"experimentation"-[omitted]-experience-test -- 78. Experiri [omitted]-"experiencing -- 79. Exact science and experimentation -- 80. Experiri-experientia-experimentum-"experimentation -- III. The Interplay -- 81. Interplay -- 82. Interplay -- 83. Being, according to all metaphysics -- 84. Beings -- 85. The originary appropriation of the first beginning means gaining a foothold in the other beginning.

86. What the history of metaphysics provides and thus passes on as still implicit and as unknown to this history -- 87. The history of the first beginning (the history of metaphysics) -- 88. The "historical" lecture courses belong in the sphere of this task -- 89. The transition to the other beginning -- 90. From the first to the other beginning. Negation -- 91. From the first to the other beginning -- 92. The confrontation between the first and the other beginning -- 93. The great philosophies -- 94. The confrontation of the other beginning -- 95. The first beginning -- 96. The inceptual interpretation of beings as [omitted] -- 97. [omitted] -- 98. The projection of beingness upon constant presence -- 99. "Being" and " becoming" in inceptual thinking -- 100. The first beginning -- 101. From early on, the great simplicity … -- 102. Thinking: The guideline of the guiding question of Western philosophy -- 103. On the concept of German Idealism -- 104. German Idealism -- 105. Hölderlin-Kierkegaard-Nietzsche -- 106. The decision with regard to all "ontology" in carrying out the confrontation between the first and the other beginning -- 107. The answer to the guiding question and the form of traditional metaphysics -- 108. The basic metaphysical positions within the history of the guiding question and their respective interpretations of time-space -- 109. [omitted] -- 110. The [omitted], Platonism, and idealism -- 111. The "apriori" and [omitted] -- 112. The "apriori -- 113. [omitted] and [omitted] -- 114. On Nietzsche's basic metaphysical position -- IV. The Leap -- 115. The disposition guiding the leap -- 116. The history of being -- 117. The leap -- 118. The leap -- 119. The leap is prepared by asking the basic question -- 120. The leap -- 121. Beyng and beings -- 122. The leap (the thrown projection) -- 123. Beyng -- 124. The leap.

125. Beyng and time -- 126. Beyng, beings, and the gods -- 127. The fissure -- 128. Beyng and the human being -- 129. Nothingness -- 130. The "essence" of beyng -- 131. The excess in the essence of beyng (self-concealment) -- 132. Beyng and beings -- 133. The essence of beyng -- 134. The relation between Da-sein and beyng -- 135. The essential occurrence of beyng as event (the relation between Da-sein and beyng) -- 136. Beyng -- 137. Beyng -- 138. The truth of beyng and the understanding of being -- 139. The essential occurrence of beyng: Truth and time-space -- 140. The essential occurrence of beyng -- 141. The essence of beyng -- 142. The essence of beyng -- 143. Beyng -- 144. Beyng and the original strife (beyng or non-beyng in the essence of beyng itself) -- 145. Beyng and nothingness -- 146. Beyng and non-beyng -- 147. The essential occurrence of beyng (the finitude of beyng) -- 148. Beings are -- 149. The beingness of beings distinguished according to [omitted] and [omitted] -- 150. The origin of the distinction between what a being is and the fact that it is -- 151. Being and beings -- 152. The levels of beyng -- 153. Life -- 154. "Life -- 155. Nature and earth -- 156. The fissure -- 157. The fissure and the "modalities -- 158. The fissure and the "modalities -- 159. The fissure -- 160. Being-toward-death and being -- 161. Being-toward-death -- 162. Beyng-toward-death -- 163. Being-toward-death and being -- 164. The essential occurrence of beyng -- 165. Essence as essential occurrence -- 166. Essential occurrence and essence -- 167. Entering into the essential occurrence -- V. The Grounding -- a) Da-sein and the projection of being -- 168. Da-sein and beyng -- 169. Da-sein -- 170. Da-sein -- 171. Da-sein -- 172. Da-sein and the question of being -- 173. Da-sein -- 174. Da-sein and steadfastness -- 175. Da-sein and beings as a whole.

176. Da-sein. Clarification of the word -- 177. Being-away -- 178. "Da-sein exists for the sake of itself -- 179. "Existence" (Being and Time, [German] p. 42) -- 180. Beyng and the understanding of being -- 181. The leap -- 182. The projection of beyng. The projection as thrown -- 183. The projection upon beyng -- 184. The question of being as the question of the truth of beyng -- 185. What does Da-sein mean? -- 186. Da-sein -- b) Da-sein -- 187. The grounding -- 188. The grounding -- 189. Da-sein -- 190. Of Da-sein -- 191. Da-sein -- 192. Da-sein -- 193. Da-sein and the human being -- 194. The human being and Da-sein -- 195. Da-sein and the human being -- 196. Da-sein and a people -- 197. Da-sein-domain of what is proper-selfhood -- 198. The grounding of Da-sein as a creative grounding -- 199. Transcendence, Da-sein, and beyng -- 200. Da-sein -- 201. Da-sein and being-away -- 202. Da-sein (Being-away) -- 203. The projection and Da-sein -- c) The essence of truth -- 204. The essence of truth -- 205. The open -- 206. From [omitted] to Da-sein -- 207. From [omitted] to Da-sein -- 208. Truth -- 209. [omitted]-openness and the clearing of what is self-concealing -- 210. Concerning the history of the essence of truth -- 211. [omitted] The crisis of its history in Plato and Aristotle, its last glimmering and complete collapse -- 212. Truth as certainty -- 213. What the question of truth is about -- 214. The essence of truth (Openness) -- 215. The essential occurrence of truth -- 216. The posing of the question of truth -- 217. The essence of truth -- 218. The indication of the essential occurrence of truth -- 219. The conjuncture of the question of truth -- 220. The question of truth -- 221. Truth as the essential occurrence of beyng -- 222. Truth -- 223. The essence of truth (the distorted essence of truth) -- 224. The essence of truth.

225. The essence of truth.

Martin Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy reflects his famous philosophical "turning." In this work, Heidegger returns to the question of being from its inception in Being and Time to a new questioning of being as event. Heidegger opens up the essential dimensions of his thinking on the historicality of being that underlies all of his later writings. Contributions was composed as a series of private ponderings that were not originally intended for publication. They are nonlinear and radically at odds with the traditional understanding of thinking. This translation presents Heidegger in plain and straightforward terms, allowing surer access to this new turn in Heidegger's conception of being.

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