Grammatical Theory and Romance Languages : Selected papers from the 25th Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages (LSRL XXV) Seattle, 2-4 March 1995.

By: Zagona, KarenSeries: Current Issues in Linguistic TheoryPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 1996Copyright date: ©1996Description: 1 online resource (336 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027276278Subject(s): Romance languages -- Grammar -- CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Grammatical Theory and Romance Languages : Selected papers from the 25th Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages (LSRL XXV) Seattle, 2–4 March 1995DDC classification: 440 LOC classification: PC61 -- .L56 1995ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
GRAMMATICAL THEORY AND ROMANCE LANGUAGES -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- PARTICIPIAL CLAUSES IN BULGARIANITALIAN AND SPANISHARGUMENT STRUCTURE, AGREEMENT AND CASE -- 0. Introduction -- 1. A typology of ΡAs -- 2. Feature specification and derivations -- REFERENCES -- EDGE EFFECTS AND UNSTRESSED SYLLABLES IN SPANISH -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Stress patterns of Spanish nouns -- 3. A metrical account of Spanish stress -- 4. Constraints on nonmetrical stress -- 4.1 Syllable weight. -- 4.2 Edge biases. -- 4.3 Underlying prominence. -- 4.4 A new taxonomy. -- 5. Discussion and conclusion -- 6. Appendix: Equations -- REFERENCES -- THE AMBIGUITY OF THE ITALIAN PRESENT PERFECT -- 1. The problem -- 2. The ambiguity hypothesis -- 3. Tense and mood -- REFERENCES -- THE DISTRIBUTION OF À AND DE IN TOUGHCONSTRUCTIONS IN FRENCH -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 P(arasitic)-gaps -- 1.2 Tense effect -- 1.3 Reconstruction -- 1.4 Condition C -- 1.5 Clitic climbing and object shift in Old French -- 2. A structural distinction between à and de -- 3. An analysis of TM -- 3.1 Tough predicates as disjunctive subcategorizers -- 3.2 Clausal theta-predication -- 3.3 Modes of predication are parasitic on structure -- 3.4 Α-Chain, Case and theta-role saturation -- REFERENCES -- PROMINENCE VS. RHYTHMTHE PREDICTABILITY OF STRESS IN ROMANIAN -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Primary stress -- 2.1 Nouns and adjectives -- 2.2 Verbs -- 2.3 Summary -- 3. Secondary stress -- 3.1 The basic pattern -- 3.2 Possible analyses of secondary stress -- 4. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- ON THE CONFIGURATIONAL NATURE OF ADJECTIVALMODIFICATION -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Theoretical background -- 2. The position of adjectives and their interpretation -- 2.1 Adjectives and adverbs: some significant analogies -- 2.2 Some restrictions on the interpretation of adjectives.
3. Towards an explanation of adjective placement -- REFERENCES -- SYNTACTIC CONFIGURATIONS AND REFERENCE -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Two impersonal SI's in Italian -- 2. Passive intransitives and the argument-status of PRO -- 3. Nominative Case assignment in Romanian nonfinite clauses -- 4. Control and middle-passive si -- REFERENCES -- THE SCOPE OF UNIVERSAL QUANTIFIERS IN SPANISHINTERROGATIVES -- 1. The Kartunnen-Peters contrast -- 2. The scope of cada -- 3. Matrix and embedded interrogatives -- 3.1. Matrix questions -- 3.2. Embedded questions -- 4. The role of the wh-phrase -- 5. Quantifier absorption and quantifier scope -- REFERENCES -- THE SYNTAX AND MORPHOLOGY OF CLASS MARKERSUPPRESSION IN SPANISH -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Adjective interpretation and class markers in Spanish -- 3. Spanish word structure: syntax and morpholog -- 4. Class marker suppression in Spanish -- 5. APPENDIX: The morphological categorization of verb forms -- REFERENCES -- THE PROSODIG ENVIRONMENT OF S-WEAKENINGIN ARGENTINIAN SPANISH -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 3. The preservation of final /s/ -- 4. Prevocalic word-final /s/ -- 5. Other rules sensitive to pause -- 6. S-weakening as a P2 rule -- REFERENCES -- PERFECTIVE AUXILIARIES, POSSESSIONAND EXISTENCE IN ROMANCE -- 0. Introduction. -- 1. The syntax of possession and existence -- 1.1. Possessive HAVE -- 1.2. Romance existential predicates -- 2. The syntax of perfective constructions -- REFERENCES -- GENDER AGREEMENT AND SUPPLETION IN FRENCH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Adjectival suppletion -- 2. The suppletive form as a feminine -- 2.1. Traneľs OT treatment -- 2.2. Feminine and VI contexts -- 3. The suppletive form as a masculine (unmarked) -- 3.1. Default and dependent morphemes -- 3.2. Unmarked forms in marked contexts -- 3.3. Suppletion in masculine VI contexts -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES.
TWO ISSUES IN NULL OBJECTS IN BASQUE SPANISH:MORPHOLOGICAL DECODING AND GRAMMATICAL PERMEABILITY -- 0. Introduction -- I.Null objects in Basque Spanish -- 2. Basque influence -- 3.Grammatical permeability and pre-existing structural parallelism -- 4. Desinential morphology versus clitic morphology -- 5. Morphological decoding -- REFERENCES -- ATTRIBUTIVE AND PREDICATIVE ADJECTIVE AGREEMENTIN GERMANIC AND ROMANCE & pro IDENTIFICATION -- 1. Predicative adjective agreement -- 2. Referential null subjects -- 3. Agreement as visibility control along with case -- 4. Internal structure of adjectives -- 5. The syntactic nature of predicative adjectives -- REFERENCES -- CLITIC-DOUBLED DATIVE "SUBJECTS" IN SPANISH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Clitic doubling and dative clitics -- 2. Subject doubling vs. Clitic Left Dislocation (CLLD) -- 3. DE clitics as agreement in AgrS -- 4. Consequences: Raising -- 5. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- THE ABSENCE OR PRESENCE OF A DECLINATIONEFFECT ON THE DESCENT OF FO PEAKS?EVIDENCE FROM MEXICAN SPANISH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Experimental design and measurements -- 2.0 FO peak height -- 2.1 Initial rise as evidence of constant pitch range -- 2.2 The non-effect of phrasal length on peak height -- 2.3 The distance between pitch accents: an effect on peak height? -- 2.4 Downstep patterns -- 3.0 Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- WORD ORDER, PREDICATION AND AGREEMENT IN DPS INSPANISH, SOUTHERN QUECHUA AND SOUTHERNANDEAN BILINGUAL SPANISH -- 0. Introduction. -- 1.0 The syntactic properties of restrictive adjectives andrestrictive relative clauses in SS, SQ and SABS -- 1.1 Canonical word order -- 1.3 Stacking -- 2.0 Predicate Phrase and restrictive modification -- 2.1. Word order and noun incorporation -- 2.2 NP-modification, null Ν Ρ֊licensing and Ν Ρ-movement -- 2.3 Kayne (1994) -- 2.4 Predicate Phrase -- REFERENCES.
CLITIC OMISSION AND PARTICIPLE AGREEMENT INITALIAN CHILD LANGUAGE -- 1. Object - Past Participle agreement in Italian -- 2. Empirical inadequacies -- 3. Right dislocation and clitic drop -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- FRENCH SYLLABLE STRUCTURE:RECONSIDERING THE STATUS OF THE ONSET -- 0. Introduction -- 1.0 Restrictions on the minimal word in French -- 2.0 Apparent weight-sensitivity in French onsets -- 2.1 Stress perception -- 2.2 Exceptional abbreviations, acronyms, and Verlan forms -- 3.0 Language games and syllable structure -- 3.1 Verlan -- 3.2 Loucherbem (Plénat 1985) and Javenáis {Plenat 1991 -- 3.3 Hypocoristics -- 4.0 Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- MERGE AND CLITICIZATION IN OLD ROMANCEFUTURES/CONDITIONALS -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Deriving split futures -- 2. The elitie cluster interpretation -- 3. The position of elities in the derivation -- 4. Temporal vs. modal interpretation -- 5. The rise and fall of split futures -- 6. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- TWO TYPES OF UNACCUSATIVES:EVIDENCE FROM A NORTHERN ITALIAN DIALECT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Semantic classes and syntactic structure -- 2.1 Evidence from Borgomanerese for two classes of unaccusatives -- 2.2 The structural difference between LUs and non-LUs -- 3. The LU construction in Italian? -- 4. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- AN EXPLETIVE NEGATION WHICH IS NOT SO REDUNDANT -- 0. Introduction -- 2 Finché with negated A and B -- 3. Complementing only one interval -- 4 . Expletive negation -- 4.1 The disambiguating effect of negation -- 4.2 Negative concord -- 4.3 Cooccurrence with più -- 4.4 Infinitivals -- 5. Summary and conclusion -- REFERENCES -- EXCEPTIONALITY IN OPTIMALITY THEORY AND FINALCONSONANTS IN FRENCH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Proposal within Optimality Theory -- 1.1. Analysis outline -- 1.2. Assumptions about the representation of final consonants in French -- 1.3 Constraints.
1.4. Principles regarding constraint ranking -- 1.5. Analysis -- 1.5.1. The central role of ONSET -- 1.5.2. Prevocalic liaison context -- 1.5.3. Preconsonantal liaison context -- 1.5.4. At the pause -- 2. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- THE NATURE OF THE SUBJUNCTIVE ANDTHE FORMAL GRAMMAR OF OBVIATION -- 0. Introduction. -- 1. The nature of the Subjunctive -- 1.1 The problem -- 1.2 Modality and the representation of the subjunctive -- 1.3 The tense of subjunctives -- 1.4 Some empirical consequences -- 2. Obviation -- 2.1 The domain of obviation -- 2.2 Selection and feature checking -- 3. Back to the initial problem -- 4. Conclusion, extensions and residual problems -- REFERENCES -- SUBJUNCTIVE OF NEGATION AND [NEG(ATIVE)]COMPLEMENTIZERS -- 0. Introduction -- 1. The [NEG]COMP Hypothesis -- 1.1. [NEGJCOMP and the subjunctive mood -- 1.2. The Basque clausal suffix -(e)nik -- 2. The [NEGJCOMP Hypothesis revisited -- 2.1. Long distance licensing and the selection of [Neg]CO MPs -- 2.2. Licensing subjunctive -- 2.3. -(E)nik and -(e)na -- REFERENCES -- INDEX OF AUTHORS -- INDEX OF TERMS & CONCEPTS -- INDEX OF LANGUAGES & LANGUAGE FAMILIES.
Summary: This volume presents recent theoretical research on Romance languages, selected from papers presented at the 25th Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages. It includes studies of individual Romance languages as well as comparative studies - both within the Romance family and with non-Romance languages (Basque, Bulgarian, Germanic and Quechua). Papers in phonetics and phonology treat stress, syllable structure, s-weakening, and the declination effect. Morphological topics include class-marker suppression and gender agreement and suppletion. Topics in syntactic theory include clitics, participial and adjectival agreement, the syntax of tense, mood, negation, adjectival predication, Tough-constructions, quantification and null objects.
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GRAMMATICAL THEORY AND ROMANCE LANGUAGES -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- PARTICIPIAL CLAUSES IN BULGARIANITALIAN AND SPANISHARGUMENT STRUCTURE, AGREEMENT AND CASE -- 0. Introduction -- 1. A typology of ΡAs -- 2. Feature specification and derivations -- REFERENCES -- EDGE EFFECTS AND UNSTRESSED SYLLABLES IN SPANISH -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Stress patterns of Spanish nouns -- 3. A metrical account of Spanish stress -- 4. Constraints on nonmetrical stress -- 4.1 Syllable weight. -- 4.2 Edge biases. -- 4.3 Underlying prominence. -- 4.4 A new taxonomy. -- 5. Discussion and conclusion -- 6. Appendix: Equations -- REFERENCES -- THE AMBIGUITY OF THE ITALIAN PRESENT PERFECT -- 1. The problem -- 2. The ambiguity hypothesis -- 3. Tense and mood -- REFERENCES -- THE DISTRIBUTION OF À AND DE IN TOUGHCONSTRUCTIONS IN FRENCH -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 P(arasitic)-gaps -- 1.2 Tense effect -- 1.3 Reconstruction -- 1.4 Condition C -- 1.5 Clitic climbing and object shift in Old French -- 2. A structural distinction between à and de -- 3. An analysis of TM -- 3.1 Tough predicates as disjunctive subcategorizers -- 3.2 Clausal theta-predication -- 3.3 Modes of predication are parasitic on structure -- 3.4 Α-Chain, Case and theta-role saturation -- REFERENCES -- PROMINENCE VS. RHYTHMTHE PREDICTABILITY OF STRESS IN ROMANIAN -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Primary stress -- 2.1 Nouns and adjectives -- 2.2 Verbs -- 2.3 Summary -- 3. Secondary stress -- 3.1 The basic pattern -- 3.2 Possible analyses of secondary stress -- 4. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- ON THE CONFIGURATIONAL NATURE OF ADJECTIVALMODIFICATION -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Theoretical background -- 2. The position of adjectives and their interpretation -- 2.1 Adjectives and adverbs: some significant analogies -- 2.2 Some restrictions on the interpretation of adjectives.

3. Towards an explanation of adjective placement -- REFERENCES -- SYNTACTIC CONFIGURATIONS AND REFERENCE -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Two impersonal SI's in Italian -- 2. Passive intransitives and the argument-status of PRO -- 3. Nominative Case assignment in Romanian nonfinite clauses -- 4. Control and middle-passive si -- REFERENCES -- THE SCOPE OF UNIVERSAL QUANTIFIERS IN SPANISHINTERROGATIVES -- 1. The Kartunnen-Peters contrast -- 2. The scope of cada -- 3. Matrix and embedded interrogatives -- 3.1. Matrix questions -- 3.2. Embedded questions -- 4. The role of the wh-phrase -- 5. Quantifier absorption and quantifier scope -- REFERENCES -- THE SYNTAX AND MORPHOLOGY OF CLASS MARKERSUPPRESSION IN SPANISH -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Adjective interpretation and class markers in Spanish -- 3. Spanish word structure: syntax and morpholog -- 4. Class marker suppression in Spanish -- 5. APPENDIX: The morphological categorization of verb forms -- REFERENCES -- THE PROSODIG ENVIRONMENT OF S-WEAKENINGIN ARGENTINIAN SPANISH -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 3. The preservation of final /s/ -- 4. Prevocalic word-final /s/ -- 5. Other rules sensitive to pause -- 6. S-weakening as a P2 rule -- REFERENCES -- PERFECTIVE AUXILIARIES, POSSESSIONAND EXISTENCE IN ROMANCE -- 0. Introduction. -- 1. The syntax of possession and existence -- 1.1. Possessive HAVE -- 1.2. Romance existential predicates -- 2. The syntax of perfective constructions -- REFERENCES -- GENDER AGREEMENT AND SUPPLETION IN FRENCH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Adjectival suppletion -- 2. The suppletive form as a feminine -- 2.1. Traneľs OT treatment -- 2.2. Feminine and VI contexts -- 3. The suppletive form as a masculine (unmarked) -- 3.1. Default and dependent morphemes -- 3.2. Unmarked forms in marked contexts -- 3.3. Suppletion in masculine VI contexts -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES.

TWO ISSUES IN NULL OBJECTS IN BASQUE SPANISH:MORPHOLOGICAL DECODING AND GRAMMATICAL PERMEABILITY -- 0. Introduction -- I.Null objects in Basque Spanish -- 2. Basque influence -- 3.Grammatical permeability and pre-existing structural parallelism -- 4. Desinential morphology versus clitic morphology -- 5. Morphological decoding -- REFERENCES -- ATTRIBUTIVE AND PREDICATIVE ADJECTIVE AGREEMENTIN GERMANIC AND ROMANCE & pro IDENTIFICATION -- 1. Predicative adjective agreement -- 2. Referential null subjects -- 3. Agreement as visibility control along with case -- 4. Internal structure of adjectives -- 5. The syntactic nature of predicative adjectives -- REFERENCES -- CLITIC-DOUBLED DATIVE "SUBJECTS" IN SPANISH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Clitic doubling and dative clitics -- 2. Subject doubling vs. Clitic Left Dislocation (CLLD) -- 3. DE clitics as agreement in AgrS -- 4. Consequences: Raising -- 5. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- THE ABSENCE OR PRESENCE OF A DECLINATIONEFFECT ON THE DESCENT OF FO PEAKS?EVIDENCE FROM MEXICAN SPANISH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Experimental design and measurements -- 2.0 FO peak height -- 2.1 Initial rise as evidence of constant pitch range -- 2.2 The non-effect of phrasal length on peak height -- 2.3 The distance between pitch accents: an effect on peak height? -- 2.4 Downstep patterns -- 3.0 Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- WORD ORDER, PREDICATION AND AGREEMENT IN DPS INSPANISH, SOUTHERN QUECHUA AND SOUTHERNANDEAN BILINGUAL SPANISH -- 0. Introduction. -- 1.0 The syntactic properties of restrictive adjectives andrestrictive relative clauses in SS, SQ and SABS -- 1.1 Canonical word order -- 1.3 Stacking -- 2.0 Predicate Phrase and restrictive modification -- 2.1. Word order and noun incorporation -- 2.2 NP-modification, null Ν Ρ֊licensing and Ν Ρ-movement -- 2.3 Kayne (1994) -- 2.4 Predicate Phrase -- REFERENCES.

CLITIC OMISSION AND PARTICIPLE AGREEMENT INITALIAN CHILD LANGUAGE -- 1. Object - Past Participle agreement in Italian -- 2. Empirical inadequacies -- 3. Right dislocation and clitic drop -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- FRENCH SYLLABLE STRUCTURE:RECONSIDERING THE STATUS OF THE ONSET -- 0. Introduction -- 1.0 Restrictions on the minimal word in French -- 2.0 Apparent weight-sensitivity in French onsets -- 2.1 Stress perception -- 2.2 Exceptional abbreviations, acronyms, and Verlan forms -- 3.0 Language games and syllable structure -- 3.1 Verlan -- 3.2 Loucherbem (Plénat 1985) and Javenáis {Plenat 1991 -- 3.3 Hypocoristics -- 4.0 Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- MERGE AND CLITICIZATION IN OLD ROMANCEFUTURES/CONDITIONALS -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Deriving split futures -- 2. The elitie cluster interpretation -- 3. The position of elities in the derivation -- 4. Temporal vs. modal interpretation -- 5. The rise and fall of split futures -- 6. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- TWO TYPES OF UNACCUSATIVES:EVIDENCE FROM A NORTHERN ITALIAN DIALECT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Semantic classes and syntactic structure -- 2.1 Evidence from Borgomanerese for two classes of unaccusatives -- 2.2 The structural difference between LUs and non-LUs -- 3. The LU construction in Italian? -- 4. Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- AN EXPLETIVE NEGATION WHICH IS NOT SO REDUNDANT -- 0. Introduction -- 2 Finché with negated A and B -- 3. Complementing only one interval -- 4 . Expletive negation -- 4.1 The disambiguating effect of negation -- 4.2 Negative concord -- 4.3 Cooccurrence with più -- 4.4 Infinitivals -- 5. Summary and conclusion -- REFERENCES -- EXCEPTIONALITY IN OPTIMALITY THEORY AND FINALCONSONANTS IN FRENCH -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Proposal within Optimality Theory -- 1.1. Analysis outline -- 1.2. Assumptions about the representation of final consonants in French -- 1.3 Constraints.

1.4. Principles regarding constraint ranking -- 1.5. Analysis -- 1.5.1. The central role of ONSET -- 1.5.2. Prevocalic liaison context -- 1.5.3. Preconsonantal liaison context -- 1.5.4. At the pause -- 2. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- THE NATURE OF THE SUBJUNCTIVE ANDTHE FORMAL GRAMMAR OF OBVIATION -- 0. Introduction. -- 1. The nature of the Subjunctive -- 1.1 The problem -- 1.2 Modality and the representation of the subjunctive -- 1.3 The tense of subjunctives -- 1.4 Some empirical consequences -- 2. Obviation -- 2.1 The domain of obviation -- 2.2 Selection and feature checking -- 3. Back to the initial problem -- 4. Conclusion, extensions and residual problems -- REFERENCES -- SUBJUNCTIVE OF NEGATION AND [NEG(ATIVE)]COMPLEMENTIZERS -- 0. Introduction -- 1. The [NEG]COMP Hypothesis -- 1.1. [NEGJCOMP and the subjunctive mood -- 1.2. The Basque clausal suffix -(e)nik -- 2. The [NEGJCOMP Hypothesis revisited -- 2.1. Long distance licensing and the selection of [Neg]CO MPs -- 2.2. Licensing subjunctive -- 2.3. -(E)nik and -(e)na -- REFERENCES -- INDEX OF AUTHORS -- INDEX OF TERMS & CONCEPTS -- INDEX OF LANGUAGES & LANGUAGE FAMILIES.

This volume presents recent theoretical research on Romance languages, selected from papers presented at the 25th Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages. It includes studies of individual Romance languages as well as comparative studies - both within the Romance family and with non-Romance languages (Basque, Bulgarian, Germanic and Quechua). Papers in phonetics and phonology treat stress, syllable structure, s-weakening, and the declination effect. Morphological topics include class-marker suppression and gender agreement and suppletion. Topics in syntactic theory include clitics, participial and adjectival agreement, the syntax of tense, mood, negation, adjectival predication, Tough-constructions, quantification and null objects.

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