Alternative Linguistics : Descriptive and theoretical modes.

By: Davis, Philip WSeries: Current Issues in Linguistic TheoryPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 1996Copyright date: ©1996Description: 1 online resource (333 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027276315Subject(s): Linguistics -- CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Alternative Linguistics : Descriptive and theoretical modesDDC classification: 410 LOC classification: P21 -- .B54 1995ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
ALTERNATIVE LINGUISTICS DESCRIPTIVE AND THEORETICAL MODES -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- FOREWORD -- Table of contents -- WHAT CONSTITUTES 'GOOD' DATA FOR THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT? HOW CHILDREN LEARN TO TALK ABOUT THINGS WITH NO NAME: 'Double Emotions'* -- 1. What does it mean to establish 'good' data in language acquisition research? -- 1.1 Privileging theory versus privileging data -is there another choice? -- 1.2 The notion of development and its implication for 'good data ' -- 2. The study of emotion talk -- 2.1 The semantics of emotion terms -- 2.2 How children learn to talk about emotions (and other 'internal states') -- 2.3 The establishment of a 'vantage point' in narrative reasoning -- 2.4 Children's abilities to deal with conflicting emotions. -- 3. 'Double emotions' and how children learn to talk about them -- 3.1 Methods and coding -- 3.2 Results -- 3.3 Discussion -- 4. Conclusions -- APPENDIX 1 -- REFERENCES -- THE WAY OF LANGUAGE: DIMENSIONS OF VOICE -- 1. Introduction: on Ilokano -- 1.1 The dimensions of the EVENT: IMMEDIATE - REMOTE & REALIS - IRREALIS -- 2. On 'data' -- 3. On 'language': what it may be like -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- A SYNTACTIC EXPLORATION OF REPAIR IN ENGLISH CONVERSATION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methodological preliminaries -- 2.1 Definition of repair -- 2.2 Mutual relevance of self-repair and syntax -- 2.3 Data collection -- 2.4 Organization of the chapter -- 3. Exploring the syntax of repair -- 3.1 The basic patterns -- 3.2 Repair involving change from one syntactic type to another -- 3.3 The design of repair -- 3.4 Discussion of the basic patterns -- 3.5 Repair and micro-syntax -- 4.0 Repair as a resource for syntax -- 4.1 Repair and syntactic 'failure' -- 5.0 Repair and the organization of syntax -- 5.1 Walking and failing -- 6.0 Conclusions -- APPENDIX A -- APPENDIX Β.
REFERENCES -- ASSERTING IDENTITY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Unlicensed agreement -- 3. Agreement cop-outs -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- VIEWING IN COGNITION AND GRAMMAR -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Viewing -- 3. Construal -- 4. Constructions -- 5. Grounding -- 6. Tense and aspect -- 7. Subordination -- 8. Reference-points -- 9. Natural paths -- 10. Anaphora -- 11. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- WHAT CAN CONVERSATION TELL US ABOUT SYNTAX? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The data -- 3. Fundamental concepts -- 3.1 Intonation units -- 3.2 Clauses and constructional schémas -- 4. Findings -- 4.1 Evidence for syntax: constructional schémas -- 4.2 Realization of constructional schémas -- 5. Summary and conclusions -- APPENDIX -- REFERENCES -- PROLEGOMENA TO THE NEXT LINGUISTICS -- THE SAYING -- CRITIQUE, CYNICISM, AND THE MARGINALIZATION OF TEXT -- PICTURE, PERFORMANCE, PARTICIPATION, PRESENTATION -- RE-MEDIATION IS REMEDIATION IS RE-MEDIATION -- REFERENCE -- DICTIONARIES VS. ENCYCLOPAEDIAS: HOW TO DRAW THE LINE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Abstract concepts and concrete concepts -- 3. Scientific knowledge vs. everyday knowledge -- 4. An illustration: folk mice vs. scientific mice -- 5. The evidence for the folk concept -- 6. General discussion -- 7. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- INDEX OF NAMES -- INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TERMS.
Summary: The papers in this volume were presented at the Fifth Biennial Symposium of the Department of Linguistics, Rice University, March 1993. The participants were asked to concentrate in depth and in a self-reflective way upon some range of data. The intent was multifold. The first purpose was descriptive. It was expected that the participants would carry out their task in a retrospective way, exemplifying and building upon their previous work, but it was also expected that they would begin to demonstrate the configuration of some area in a more comprehensive picture of language. The point was to take (at least) one substantive step in the depiction of what we think language will ultimately be like. The contributions were both specific and generalizing, with focus as much upon methodology as upon hypotheses about language. In examining descriptive practice, we continued to concentrate upon issues which concerned us all, and at the same time we tried to advance the discourse by the results of such description. We hoped that problematic and recalcitrant data would make our own practice clearer to us and that it might also instruct us in the refinement of our conceptions of language.
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ALTERNATIVE LINGUISTICS DESCRIPTIVE AND THEORETICAL MODES -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- FOREWORD -- Table of contents -- WHAT CONSTITUTES 'GOOD' DATA FOR THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT? HOW CHILDREN LEARN TO TALK ABOUT THINGS WITH NO NAME: 'Double Emotions'* -- 1. What does it mean to establish 'good' data in language acquisition research? -- 1.1 Privileging theory versus privileging data -is there another choice? -- 1.2 The notion of development and its implication for 'good data ' -- 2. The study of emotion talk -- 2.1 The semantics of emotion terms -- 2.2 How children learn to talk about emotions (and other 'internal states') -- 2.3 The establishment of a 'vantage point' in narrative reasoning -- 2.4 Children's abilities to deal with conflicting emotions. -- 3. 'Double emotions' and how children learn to talk about them -- 3.1 Methods and coding -- 3.2 Results -- 3.3 Discussion -- 4. Conclusions -- APPENDIX 1 -- REFERENCES -- THE WAY OF LANGUAGE: DIMENSIONS OF VOICE -- 1. Introduction: on Ilokano -- 1.1 The dimensions of the EVENT: IMMEDIATE - REMOTE & REALIS - IRREALIS -- 2. On 'data' -- 3. On 'language': what it may be like -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- A SYNTACTIC EXPLORATION OF REPAIR IN ENGLISH CONVERSATION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methodological preliminaries -- 2.1 Definition of repair -- 2.2 Mutual relevance of self-repair and syntax -- 2.3 Data collection -- 2.4 Organization of the chapter -- 3. Exploring the syntax of repair -- 3.1 The basic patterns -- 3.2 Repair involving change from one syntactic type to another -- 3.3 The design of repair -- 3.4 Discussion of the basic patterns -- 3.5 Repair and micro-syntax -- 4.0 Repair as a resource for syntax -- 4.1 Repair and syntactic 'failure' -- 5.0 Repair and the organization of syntax -- 5.1 Walking and failing -- 6.0 Conclusions -- APPENDIX A -- APPENDIX Β.

REFERENCES -- ASSERTING IDENTITY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Unlicensed agreement -- 3. Agreement cop-outs -- 4. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- VIEWING IN COGNITION AND GRAMMAR -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Viewing -- 3. Construal -- 4. Constructions -- 5. Grounding -- 6. Tense and aspect -- 7. Subordination -- 8. Reference-points -- 9. Natural paths -- 10. Anaphora -- 11. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- WHAT CAN CONVERSATION TELL US ABOUT SYNTAX? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The data -- 3. Fundamental concepts -- 3.1 Intonation units -- 3.2 Clauses and constructional schémas -- 4. Findings -- 4.1 Evidence for syntax: constructional schémas -- 4.2 Realization of constructional schémas -- 5. Summary and conclusions -- APPENDIX -- REFERENCES -- PROLEGOMENA TO THE NEXT LINGUISTICS -- THE SAYING -- CRITIQUE, CYNICISM, AND THE MARGINALIZATION OF TEXT -- PICTURE, PERFORMANCE, PARTICIPATION, PRESENTATION -- RE-MEDIATION IS REMEDIATION IS RE-MEDIATION -- REFERENCE -- DICTIONARIES VS. ENCYCLOPAEDIAS: HOW TO DRAW THE LINE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Abstract concepts and concrete concepts -- 3. Scientific knowledge vs. everyday knowledge -- 4. An illustration: folk mice vs. scientific mice -- 5. The evidence for the folk concept -- 6. General discussion -- 7. Conclusion -- REFERENCES -- INDEX OF NAMES -- INDEX OF SUBJECTS AND TERMS.

The papers in this volume were presented at the Fifth Biennial Symposium of the Department of Linguistics, Rice University, March 1993. The participants were asked to concentrate in depth and in a self-reflective way upon some range of data. The intent was multifold. The first purpose was descriptive. It was expected that the participants would carry out their task in a retrospective way, exemplifying and building upon their previous work, but it was also expected that they would begin to demonstrate the configuration of some area in a more comprehensive picture of language. The point was to take (at least) one substantive step in the depiction of what we think language will ultimately be like. The contributions were both specific and generalizing, with focus as much upon methodology as upon hypotheses about language. In examining descriptive practice, we continued to concentrate upon issues which concerned us all, and at the same time we tried to advance the discourse by the results of such description. We hoped that problematic and recalcitrant data would make our own practice clearer to us and that it might also instruct us in the refinement of our conceptions of language.

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