Translation and Creation : Readings of Western Literature in Early Modern China, 1840-1918.

By: Pollard, David ESeries: Benjamins Translation LibraryPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 1998Copyright date: ©1998Description: 1 online resource (341 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027283474Subject(s): Translating and interpreting.;Literature -- Translations into Chinese -- History and criticism.;Chinese literature -- Western influencesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Translation and Creation : Readings of Western Literature in Early Modern China, 1840–1918DDC classification: 418.02 LOC classification: PN241 -- .T72 1998ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
TRANSLATION AND CREATION READINGS OF WESTERN LITERATURE IN EARLY MODERN CHINA, 1840-1918 -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- Dates, Persons, Terms -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Translation Realities -- What Was Translated? -- Translators ' Commentary -- The Papers in This Collection -- Notes -- References -- Degrees of Familiarity with the West in Late Qing Society -- Reference -- A Statistical Survey of Translated Fiction 1840-1920 -- The Translation of European and American Fiction -- Retranslation -- Note -- From Petitions to Fiction: Visions of the Future Propagated in Early Modern China -- Notes -- Liberal Versions: Late Qing Approaches to Translating Aesop's Fables -- I. Yishi yuyan (1840): Translation and Acculturation -- II. Haiguo miaoyu (1888): Translation and Assimilation -- III. Yisuo yuyan (1903): Translation and Appropriation -- IV. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Lord Byron's "The Isles of Greece" : First Translations -- Notes -- References -- The Sole Purpose is to Express My Political Views": Liang Qichao and the Translation and Writing ofPolitical Novels in the Late Qing -- Notes -- References -- The Discourse of Occidentalism?Wei Yi and Lin Shu's Treatment of Religious Material in Their Translation ofUncle Tom's Cabin -- Part One -- Uncle Tom's Cabin -- Heinu yu tian lu -- Religious material retained in the translated text -- Religious material omitted or secularized in the translated text -- Analysis -- Discourse and ideology -- Orientalism and Occidentalism -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Giving Texts a Context: Chinese Translations of Classical English Detective Stories 1896-1916 -- I. The Context -- The Basis of Selection -- Why Detective Fiction? -- Pioneering Translations -- The Blossoming of a Genre -- The Elite's Reaction -- II. The Texts.
Tailoring the Narrative -- Speedy Progress: the First-Person Narrative -- Manipulation and Cultural Intervention -- Judgement by Assumption -- A Case for Re-evaluation -- Notes -- References -- Jules Verne, Science Fiction and Related Matters -- Editor's note -- Notes -- From Popular Science to Science Fiction: An Investigation of 'Flying Machines' -- 'Balloons' in Travel Diaries -- 'Flying Machines' in Early Periodicals -- 'Flying Machines' in Dianshi Studio Pictorial -- How 'Flying Machines' Rose into the Sky -- Using Science as the Warp and Sentiment as the Woof -- Notes -- References -- Ms Picha and Mrs Stowe -- Notes -- Wang Guowei as Translator of Values -- Editor's note -- Introduction -- Wang's Interest in Western Thinking -- Wang's Response to Western Thinking -- On Translation -- Wang's Knowledge of Foreign Languages -- Wang 's Wide Range of Translations -- Wang's ViewsonTranslation -- On Education -- On Literature -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- The Influence of Translated Fiction on Chinese Romantic Fiction -- Moral Outlook -- Characterisation -- Narrative Style -- Notes -- References -- Translating Modernity -- Notes -- References -- Name Index.
Summary: In the late Qing period, from the Opium War to the 1911 revolution, China absorbed the initial impact of Western arms, manufactures, science and culture, in that order. This volume of essays deals with the reception of Western literature, on the evidence of translations made. Having to overcome Chinese assumptions of cultural superiority, the perception that the West had a literature worth notice grew only gradually. It was not until the very end of the 19th century that a translation of a Western novel (La dame aux camélias) achieved popular acclaim. But this opened the floodgates: in the first decade of the 20th century, more translated fiction was published than original fiction.The core essays in this collection deal with aspects of this influx according to division of territory. Some take key works (e.g. Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Byron's "The Isles of Greece"), some sample genres (science fiction, detective fiction, fables, political novels), the common attention being to the adjustments made by translators to suit the prevailing aesthetic, cultural and social norms, and/or the current needs and preoccupations of the receiving public. A broad overview of translation activities is given in the introduction.To present the subject in its true guise, that of a major cultural shift, supporting papers are included to fill in the background and to describe some of the effects of this foreign invasion on native literature. A rounded picture emerges that will be intelligible to readers who have no specialized knowledge of China.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan
Available EBKAF00055432
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal
Available EBKNP00055432
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan

Access a wide range of magazines and books using Pressreader and Ebook central.

Enjoy your reading, British Council Sudan.

Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia
Available
Total holds: 0

TRANSLATION AND CREATION READINGS OF WESTERN LITERATURE IN EARLY MODERN CHINA, 1840-1918 -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- Dates, Persons, Terms -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Translation Realities -- What Was Translated? -- Translators ' Commentary -- The Papers in This Collection -- Notes -- References -- Degrees of Familiarity with the West in Late Qing Society -- Reference -- A Statistical Survey of Translated Fiction 1840-1920 -- The Translation of European and American Fiction -- Retranslation -- Note -- From Petitions to Fiction: Visions of the Future Propagated in Early Modern China -- Notes -- Liberal Versions: Late Qing Approaches to Translating Aesop's Fables -- I. Yishi yuyan (1840): Translation and Acculturation -- II. Haiguo miaoyu (1888): Translation and Assimilation -- III. Yisuo yuyan (1903): Translation and Appropriation -- IV. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Lord Byron's "The Isles of Greece" : First Translations -- Notes -- References -- The Sole Purpose is to Express My Political Views": Liang Qichao and the Translation and Writing ofPolitical Novels in the Late Qing -- Notes -- References -- The Discourse of Occidentalism?Wei Yi and Lin Shu's Treatment of Religious Material in Their Translation ofUncle Tom's Cabin -- Part One -- Uncle Tom's Cabin -- Heinu yu tian lu -- Religious material retained in the translated text -- Religious material omitted or secularized in the translated text -- Analysis -- Discourse and ideology -- Orientalism and Occidentalism -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Giving Texts a Context: Chinese Translations of Classical English Detective Stories 1896-1916 -- I. The Context -- The Basis of Selection -- Why Detective Fiction? -- Pioneering Translations -- The Blossoming of a Genre -- The Elite's Reaction -- II. The Texts.

Tailoring the Narrative -- Speedy Progress: the First-Person Narrative -- Manipulation and Cultural Intervention -- Judgement by Assumption -- A Case for Re-evaluation -- Notes -- References -- Jules Verne, Science Fiction and Related Matters -- Editor's note -- Notes -- From Popular Science to Science Fiction: An Investigation of 'Flying Machines' -- 'Balloons' in Travel Diaries -- 'Flying Machines' in Early Periodicals -- 'Flying Machines' in Dianshi Studio Pictorial -- How 'Flying Machines' Rose into the Sky -- Using Science as the Warp and Sentiment as the Woof -- Notes -- References -- Ms Picha and Mrs Stowe -- Notes -- Wang Guowei as Translator of Values -- Editor's note -- Introduction -- Wang's Interest in Western Thinking -- Wang's Response to Western Thinking -- On Translation -- Wang's Knowledge of Foreign Languages -- Wang 's Wide Range of Translations -- Wang's ViewsonTranslation -- On Education -- On Literature -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- The Influence of Translated Fiction on Chinese Romantic Fiction -- Moral Outlook -- Characterisation -- Narrative Style -- Notes -- References -- Translating Modernity -- Notes -- References -- Name Index.

In the late Qing period, from the Opium War to the 1911 revolution, China absorbed the initial impact of Western arms, manufactures, science and culture, in that order. This volume of essays deals with the reception of Western literature, on the evidence of translations made. Having to overcome Chinese assumptions of cultural superiority, the perception that the West had a literature worth notice grew only gradually. It was not until the very end of the 19th century that a translation of a Western novel (La dame aux camélias) achieved popular acclaim. But this opened the floodgates: in the first decade of the 20th century, more translated fiction was published than original fiction.The core essays in this collection deal with aspects of this influx according to division of territory. Some take key works (e.g. Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Byron's "The Isles of Greece"), some sample genres (science fiction, detective fiction, fables, political novels), the common attention being to the adjustments made by translators to suit the prevailing aesthetic, cultural and social norms, and/or the current needs and preoccupations of the receiving public. A broad overview of translation activities is given in the introduction.To present the subject in its true guise, that of a major cultural shift, supporting papers are included to fill in the background and to describe some of the effects of this foreign invasion on native literature. A rounded picture emerges that will be intelligible to readers who have no specialized knowledge of China.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.