Poetry Translating as Expert Action : Processes, priorities and networks.

By: Jones, Francis RPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011Copyright date: ©2011Description: 1 online resource (243 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027286819Subject(s): Kettlebells.;Weight trainingGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Poetry Translating as Expert Action : Processes, priorities and networksDDC classification: 418/.041 LOC classification: PN1059.T7 -- J66 2011ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Poetry Translating as Expert Action -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Table of figures -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- 1.1 About this book -- 1.1.1 Poetry translating -- 1.1.2 Poetry translation as expert action -- 1.2 Reasons for researching poetry translation -- 1.2.1 The value of poetry translation -- 1.2.2 The research picture -- 1.2.3 The wider view -- 1.3 Five studies and a conclusion -- 1.4 Research methodology -- 1.4.1 Theories and methods -- 1.4.2 You are what you research -- Chapter 2. Poetry in a political preface -- 2.1 Foreword -- 2.2 Context: Poetry and political prose -- 2.3 The foundations of a model -- 2.3.1 Action, context and subjectivity -- 2.3.2 Relation, discourse and networks -- 2.3.3 Sketching out the framework -- 2.4 Poems and translations -- 2.4.1 Poetry as a genre -- 2.4.2 Translations -- 2.5 The translator as subject -- 2.5.1 Cognition -- 2.5.2 Emotion -- 2.5.3 Creativity -- 2.5.4 Metacognition -- 2.6 First-order networks -- 2.6.1 Translating agents, text complex and transmission -- 2.6.2 Situation, motives, power -- 2.7 Second-order networks -- 2.7.1 Interest networks -- 2.7.2 Fields and habitus -- 2.7.3 Profession -- 2.7.4 System -- 2.8 Third-order networks -- 2.8.1 Background and identities -- 2.8.2 Culture and community -- 2.8.3 Beliefs, ideologies and ethics -- 2.9 Afterword -- Chapter 3. Poetry translation webs -- 3.1 Introduction: Webs, poetry, war and peace -- 3.1.1 Webs -- 3.1.2 Background and context -- 3.2 Methods: Surveying Bosnian poetry translation -- 3.3 Findings: Projects, teams, career webs and reviews -- 3.3.1 Poetry translation projects -- 3.3.2 Poetry translation teams -- 3.3.3 Career webs -- 3.3.4 Projects and reviewers -- 3.4 Discussion: Poetry translation networks -- 3.4.1 Projects, teams and players -- 3.4.2 Fields -- 3.4.3 Interest networks.
3.4.4 Poetry translation systems -- 3.4.5 Ideologies, identities and imagined communities -- 3.5 Afterword -- Chapter 4. Talks with translators -- 4.1 Introduction: The translator's-eye-view -- 4.2 Methods: Interviewing translators -- 4.3 Findings: Translation projects, processes and products -- 4.3.1 Motivation and emotion -- 4.3.2 Forming the team, shaping the project -- 4.3.3 Translating processes -- 4.3.4 Translation as product -- 4.3.5 Working with translating agents -- 4.3.6 After publication -- 4.4 Discussion: Translators and how they translate poems -- 4.4.2 Loyalty and norms -- 4.4.3 Emotion and motivation -- 4.4.4 Metacognition and identity -- 4.4.5 Further interpersonal issues -- 4.5 Afterword -- Chapter 5. Five translators translate -- 5.1 Introduction: Researching real-time processes -- 5.2 Methods: The Toen wij think-alouds -- 5.2.1 Setting, source poem and data-gathering -- 5.2.2 Validity -- 5.2.3 Data analysis -- 5.3 Findings: How the Toen wij translators translated -- 5.3.1 Task time -- 5.3.2 Drafts and versions -- 5.3.3 Runs-through -- 5.3.4 Macro-sequences and Lines -- 5.3.5 Micro-sequences and foci -- 5.4 Discussion: Cognition, creativity and community -- 5.4.1 Cognition and action -- 5.4.2 Emotion -- 5.4.3 Team -- 5.4.4 Community -- 5.4.5 System -- 5.5 Afterword -- Chapter 6. Translating rhyme and rhythm -- 6.1 Introduction: Comparing two poems' processes -- 6.2 Methods: Krik and the Kulenović project -- 6.2.1 Setting, source poem and data-gathering -- 6.2.2 Generalizability -- 6.3 Findings: Toen wij and Krik compared -- 6.3.1 Task time -- 6.3.2 Drafts and versions -- 6.3.3 Runs-through -- 6.3.4 Macro-sequences and Lines -- 6.3.5 Micro-sequences, foci and creativity -- 6.3.6 Team, project and community -- 6.4 Discussion: Two poems and two projects -- 6.4.1 Cognition and action.
6.4.2 The world outside the poem: Team, project and ideology -- 6.5 Afterword -- Chapter 7. Conclusion -- 7.1 Towards a model of poetry translating -- 7.2 The translator and translating -- 7.2.1 Emotion -- 7.2.2 Cognition: Translating and managing the translation task -- 7.2.3 Norms and creativity -- 7.2.4 Areas of variation -- 7.3 Who is the poetry translator? -- 7.3.1 Skill and career patterns -- 7.3.2 Poetry translators as translators -- 7.3.3 Poetry translators as professionals -- 7.4 Project and team -- 7.4.1 People and power -- 7.4.2 Team motives and identity -- 7.5 Extended networks -- 7.5.1 Choosing and communicating texts -- 7.5.2 Fields and systems -- 7.5.3 Cultures and sub-cultures -- 7.5.4 Ideology -- 7.5.5 A translator's identities -- 7.5.6 Global power -- 7.6 Implications -- 7.6.1 Poetry translation research -- 7.6.2 Translation studies -- 7.6.3 Translator training and translating players -- References -- Index.
Summary: Poetry is a highly valued form of human expression, and poems are challenging texts to translate. For both reasons, people willingly work long and hard to translate them, for little pay but potentially high personal satisfaction. This book shows how experienced poetry translators translate poems and bring them to readers, and how they not only shape new poems, but also help communicate images of the source culture. It uses cognitive and sociological translation-studies methods to analyse real data, most of it from two contrasting source countries, the Netherlands and Bosnia. Case studies, including think-aloud studies, analyse how translators translate poems. In interviews, translators explain why and how they translate. And a 17-year survey of a country's poetry-translation output explores how translators work within networks of other people and texts - publishing teams, fellow translators, source-culture enthusiasts, and translation readers and critics. In mapping the whole sweep of poetry translators' action, from micro-cognitive to macro-social, this book gives the first translation-studies overview of poetry translating since the 1970s.
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Poetry Translating as Expert Action -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Table of figures -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- 1.1 About this book -- 1.1.1 Poetry translating -- 1.1.2 Poetry translation as expert action -- 1.2 Reasons for researching poetry translation -- 1.2.1 The value of poetry translation -- 1.2.2 The research picture -- 1.2.3 The wider view -- 1.3 Five studies and a conclusion -- 1.4 Research methodology -- 1.4.1 Theories and methods -- 1.4.2 You are what you research -- Chapter 2. Poetry in a political preface -- 2.1 Foreword -- 2.2 Context: Poetry and political prose -- 2.3 The foundations of a model -- 2.3.1 Action, context and subjectivity -- 2.3.2 Relation, discourse and networks -- 2.3.3 Sketching out the framework -- 2.4 Poems and translations -- 2.4.1 Poetry as a genre -- 2.4.2 Translations -- 2.5 The translator as subject -- 2.5.1 Cognition -- 2.5.2 Emotion -- 2.5.3 Creativity -- 2.5.4 Metacognition -- 2.6 First-order networks -- 2.6.1 Translating agents, text complex and transmission -- 2.6.2 Situation, motives, power -- 2.7 Second-order networks -- 2.7.1 Interest networks -- 2.7.2 Fields and habitus -- 2.7.3 Profession -- 2.7.4 System -- 2.8 Third-order networks -- 2.8.1 Background and identities -- 2.8.2 Culture and community -- 2.8.3 Beliefs, ideologies and ethics -- 2.9 Afterword -- Chapter 3. Poetry translation webs -- 3.1 Introduction: Webs, poetry, war and peace -- 3.1.1 Webs -- 3.1.2 Background and context -- 3.2 Methods: Surveying Bosnian poetry translation -- 3.3 Findings: Projects, teams, career webs and reviews -- 3.3.1 Poetry translation projects -- 3.3.2 Poetry translation teams -- 3.3.3 Career webs -- 3.3.4 Projects and reviewers -- 3.4 Discussion: Poetry translation networks -- 3.4.1 Projects, teams and players -- 3.4.2 Fields -- 3.4.3 Interest networks.

3.4.4 Poetry translation systems -- 3.4.5 Ideologies, identities and imagined communities -- 3.5 Afterword -- Chapter 4. Talks with translators -- 4.1 Introduction: The translator's-eye-view -- 4.2 Methods: Interviewing translators -- 4.3 Findings: Translation projects, processes and products -- 4.3.1 Motivation and emotion -- 4.3.2 Forming the team, shaping the project -- 4.3.3 Translating processes -- 4.3.4 Translation as product -- 4.3.5 Working with translating agents -- 4.3.6 After publication -- 4.4 Discussion: Translators and how they translate poems -- 4.4.2 Loyalty and norms -- 4.4.3 Emotion and motivation -- 4.4.4 Metacognition and identity -- 4.4.5 Further interpersonal issues -- 4.5 Afterword -- Chapter 5. Five translators translate -- 5.1 Introduction: Researching real-time processes -- 5.2 Methods: The Toen wij think-alouds -- 5.2.1 Setting, source poem and data-gathering -- 5.2.2 Validity -- 5.2.3 Data analysis -- 5.3 Findings: How the Toen wij translators translated -- 5.3.1 Task time -- 5.3.2 Drafts and versions -- 5.3.3 Runs-through -- 5.3.4 Macro-sequences and Lines -- 5.3.5 Micro-sequences and foci -- 5.4 Discussion: Cognition, creativity and community -- 5.4.1 Cognition and action -- 5.4.2 Emotion -- 5.4.3 Team -- 5.4.4 Community -- 5.4.5 System -- 5.5 Afterword -- Chapter 6. Translating rhyme and rhythm -- 6.1 Introduction: Comparing two poems' processes -- 6.2 Methods: Krik and the Kulenović project -- 6.2.1 Setting, source poem and data-gathering -- 6.2.2 Generalizability -- 6.3 Findings: Toen wij and Krik compared -- 6.3.1 Task time -- 6.3.2 Drafts and versions -- 6.3.3 Runs-through -- 6.3.4 Macro-sequences and Lines -- 6.3.5 Micro-sequences, foci and creativity -- 6.3.6 Team, project and community -- 6.4 Discussion: Two poems and two projects -- 6.4.1 Cognition and action.

6.4.2 The world outside the poem: Team, project and ideology -- 6.5 Afterword -- Chapter 7. Conclusion -- 7.1 Towards a model of poetry translating -- 7.2 The translator and translating -- 7.2.1 Emotion -- 7.2.2 Cognition: Translating and managing the translation task -- 7.2.3 Norms and creativity -- 7.2.4 Areas of variation -- 7.3 Who is the poetry translator? -- 7.3.1 Skill and career patterns -- 7.3.2 Poetry translators as translators -- 7.3.3 Poetry translators as professionals -- 7.4 Project and team -- 7.4.1 People and power -- 7.4.2 Team motives and identity -- 7.5 Extended networks -- 7.5.1 Choosing and communicating texts -- 7.5.2 Fields and systems -- 7.5.3 Cultures and sub-cultures -- 7.5.4 Ideology -- 7.5.5 A translator's identities -- 7.5.6 Global power -- 7.6 Implications -- 7.6.1 Poetry translation research -- 7.6.2 Translation studies -- 7.6.3 Translator training and translating players -- References -- Index.

Poetry is a highly valued form of human expression, and poems are challenging texts to translate. For both reasons, people willingly work long and hard to translate them, for little pay but potentially high personal satisfaction. This book shows how experienced poetry translators translate poems and bring them to readers, and how they not only shape new poems, but also help communicate images of the source culture. It uses cognitive and sociological translation-studies methods to analyse real data, most of it from two contrasting source countries, the Netherlands and Bosnia. Case studies, including think-aloud studies, analyse how translators translate poems. In interviews, translators explain why and how they translate. And a 17-year survey of a country's poetry-translation output explores how translators work within networks of other people and texts - publishing teams, fellow translators, source-culture enthusiasts, and translation readers and critics. In mapping the whole sweep of poetry translators' action, from micro-cognitive to macro-social, this book gives the first translation-studies overview of poetry translating since the 1970s.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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