Subordination in Native South American Languages.

By: Gijn, Rik vanContributor(s): Haude, Katharina | Muysken, PieterPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011Copyright date: ©2011Description: 1 online resource (328 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027287090Subject(s): Language and languages -- Variation.;Indians of South America -- Languages.;South America -- LanguagesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Subordination in Native South American LanguagesDDC classification: 498 LOC classification: PM5008 -- .S83 2011ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Subordination in Native South American Languages -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- List of contributors -- Subordination in South America -- 1. What is subordination? -- 2. The discovery of subordination strategies in South America -- 3. Major patterns in South-American subordination strategies -- 4. The contributions in the present volume -- Abbreviations -- References -- Subordinate adverbial constructions in Mekens -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Overview of Mekens major morphosyntactic properties -- 3. Adverbial constructions -- 3.1 Temporal/conditional adverbial modification -- 3.1.1 [Nominalization + Postp] -- 3.1.2 [DEM + Postp] -- 3.2 Cause and reason adverbial constructions -- 3.2.1 [Noun/nominalization + Postp] -- 3.2.2 [DEM+ Postps] -- 3.2.3 Derived verb phrase -- 3.3 Purposive adverbial constructions -- 3.3.1 Derived verb phrase -- 3.3.2 Complex structures with motion verbs -- 4. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Relative clauses in Mebẽngokre -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Introduction to Mẽbengokre noun phrases -- 3. Internal characteristics of relative clauses -- 3.1 Relative clauses lack tense and other categories -- 3.2 There is no marking of the head -- 3.3 No restriction on positions that may be relativized -- 3.4 Definiteness of the internal head -- 3.5 Heads can be dropped -- 4. External characteristics of relative clauses -- 4.1 The nature of RC-external elements -- 4.2 External versus internal heads -- 4.3 Dislocation of relative clauses -- 5. General characterization of relative clauses -- 5.1 Comparison with complement and adjunct clauses -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- Rerences -- Clause embedding strategies in Baure (Arawakan) -- 1. General information -- 2. Typological overview -- 3. Clause combining, subordination, and clause embedding in Baure -- 4. Embedded clauses.
4.1 Relative clauses marked by -no 'nmlz' -- 4.2 Relative clauses marked by -ri 'Pnmlz' -- 4.3 Complement clauses marked by -cho 'ptcp' -- 4.4 Comparison of embedding strategies -- 4.5 Complex embedding -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Subordinate clauses, switch-reference, and tail-head linkage in Cavineña narratives -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Cavineña: Some morphosyntactic background -- 2.1 Main clauses -- 2.2 Subordinate clauses -- 3. Temporal subordinate clauses -- 3.1 Non-finite temporal same-subject clause -- 3.2 Finite temporal different-subject clause -- 3.3 Adverbially-used relative clauses -- 4. Variation on a theme: Formal variants of THL in Cavineña -- 5. Cavineña THL and processing ease -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Appendix -- Illustrative text -- Referring to states and events -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Basic main clause structure -- 2.1 The major components of main clauses -- 2.2 Argument encoding and alignment -- 2.3 Verbal voice marking -- 3. Referential phrases -- 3.1 Articles -- 3.2 Verbs in RPs -- 3.3 Possessor encoding -- 4. Nouns and verbs -- 5. Subordinate clauses -- 5.1 Types and functions of subordinate clauses -- 5.2 Subordinate derivation: Nominalization or lexical aspect? -- 5.3 Argument structure and alignment in subordinate phrases -- 5.4 Voice marking on subordinate predicates -- 5.5 The article in subordinate phrases -- 6. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Semantic and grammatical integration in Yurakaré subordination -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 General data -- 2. Defining subordination -- 3. Clause combinations in Yurakaré -- 3.1 Serial-verb constructions -- 3.2 Deranked clauses with a subordination marker -- 3.3 Balanced clauses with a subordination marker -- 4. Conceptual integration and clause integration -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References.
Subordination in Cholón -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Stems, prefixes, and suffixes -- 2.1 Simple stems -- 2.2 Complex stems -- 2.3 Derivation -- 2.4 Person marking -- 2.5 TAM -- 2.6 Excursus on the copula -- 2.7 Verb structures: A summary -- 3. Subordinate clauses -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Complement clauses -- 3.2.1 Subject clauses -- 3.2.2 Object clauses -- 3.2.3 Nominal predicate clauses -- 3.3 Relative clauses -- 3.3.1 Nominalizers -eč, -lam, -ŋo, -wuč -- 3.3.2 Demonstratives iŋko, into-ŋko and ko, and the indefinite pronoun ol -- 3.3.3 Finite verb forms -- 3.4 Adverbial clauses -- 3.4.1 Causal clauses -- 3.4.2 Purposive clauses -- 3.4.3 Temporal clauses -- 3.4.4 Resultative clauses -- 3.4.5 Other adverbial clauses -- 3.4.6 Hypothetical clauses -- 3.4.7 Concessive and conditional clauses -- 3.5 Excursus on nominalizers, (nominalizing) subordinators and subordinate clauses -- 4. Conclusion: Synoptic overview -- 4.1 Subordination without case marking -- 4.2 Subordination with case marking -- Abbreviations -- References -- Cofán subordinate clauses in a typology of subordination -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Cofán -- 1.2 Aim of this paper -- 2. Subordination from a cross-linguistic perspective -- 2.1 Balanced and deranked subordinate clauses -- 2.2 Cristofaro 2003 -- 2.3 Malchukov 2004 -- 2.4 Cliticized subordinating conjunctions -- 3. Cofán main and subordinate clauses -- 4. Subordination stategies in Cofán -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Balanced subordinate clauses -- 4.2.1 cho clauses -- 4.2.2 =pa and =si clauses -- 4.2.3 Case and/or definiteness marked subordinate clauses -- 4.2.3.1 =ma and =ve subordinate clauses -- 4.2.3.2 =ni, =ni=ja/=ta and =ja/=ta clauses -- 4.3 Deranked subordinate clauses -- 4.3.1 -ye clauses -- 4.3.2 -'su clauses -- 4.3.3 -pa nominalizations -- 4.4 Summary -- 5. Discussion of the data from a typological perspective.
5.1 The coding of the participants -- 5.2 The coding of the verb -- 5.3 The expression of case -- 6. Summary and conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Relative clauses in Ecuadorian Quechua -- 1. Overview -- 2. The basic nominalizing suffixes and relative clause formation in Imbabura Quechua -- 3. Dialect variation in Ecuadorian Quechua relative clauses -- 3.1 Preliminary remarks -- 3.2 Historical sources for Ecuadorian Quechua and the situation in other Quechua varieties -- 3.3 Salcedo and Tigua Quechua -- 3.4 Salasaca Quechua -- 3.5 Arajuno (Tena) Quechua -- 3.6 Calderón Quechua -- 4. Theoretical analysis in terms of Optimality Theory -- 4.1 Three main dialect areas -- 4.2 A theoretical account -- 5. Implications for the development of Ecuadorian Quechua -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Participial clauses in Tarma Quechua -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Types of subordination -- 2.1 Adverbial subordination (converbs) -- 2.2 Nominalization and case -- 2.3 Nominalization without case -- 3. Types of nominalization -- 4. The participial clause, a non-standard use of -sha nominalization in Tarma Quechua -- 5. Aspect in participial clauses -- 6. Participial clauses with an encoded object -- 7. A possible model for the absence of ergative behavior in participial clauses -- 8. Quechua participial clauses and the Indo-European absolute construction -- 9. Final semantic characterization of the participial clause in Tarma Quechua -- Abbreviations -- References -- Complex sentences in Uchumataqu in a comparative perspective with Chipaya -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Sociolinguistic and historical aspects -- 1.2 Sources on Uchumataqu -- 1.3 Aim of the paper -- 2. Subordination in Uchumataqu -- 2.1 Adverbial relations -- 2.1.1 Time sequence relations -- 2.1.2 Simultaneity relations -- 2.1.3 Conditional relations -- 2.1.4 Purpose relations.
2.2 Complement relations -- 2.2.1 Action nominaliser -s(i) -- 2.2.2 Multiverb constructions -- 3. Uchumataqu and Chipaya in a comparative perspective -- 3.1 Adverbial relations -- 3.2 Complement relations -- 3.3 Adjectival relations -- 3.4 Preliminary conclusions -- 4. Conclusions -- Abbreviations and symbols -- References -- Author index -- Language index -- Subject index -- The series Typological Studies in Language.
Summary: The following article aims at providing an overview of complex sentences in Uchumataqu (Uru), including a brief comparison with subordination devices in the genetically related Chipaya language. The comparison seeks to provide an impression of the similarities and differences between subordination strategies in the two languages, and it will become apparent that there are some considerable differences which show that Uchumataqu and Chipaya represent different morphological types.
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Subordination in Native South American Languages -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- List of contributors -- Subordination in South America -- 1. What is subordination? -- 2. The discovery of subordination strategies in South America -- 3. Major patterns in South-American subordination strategies -- 4. The contributions in the present volume -- Abbreviations -- References -- Subordinate adverbial constructions in Mekens -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Overview of Mekens major morphosyntactic properties -- 3. Adverbial constructions -- 3.1 Temporal/conditional adverbial modification -- 3.1.1 [Nominalization + Postp] -- 3.1.2 [DEM + Postp] -- 3.2 Cause and reason adverbial constructions -- 3.2.1 [Noun/nominalization + Postp] -- 3.2.2 [DEM+ Postps] -- 3.2.3 Derived verb phrase -- 3.3 Purposive adverbial constructions -- 3.3.1 Derived verb phrase -- 3.3.2 Complex structures with motion verbs -- 4. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Relative clauses in Mebẽngokre -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Introduction to Mẽbengokre noun phrases -- 3. Internal characteristics of relative clauses -- 3.1 Relative clauses lack tense and other categories -- 3.2 There is no marking of the head -- 3.3 No restriction on positions that may be relativized -- 3.4 Definiteness of the internal head -- 3.5 Heads can be dropped -- 4. External characteristics of relative clauses -- 4.1 The nature of RC-external elements -- 4.2 External versus internal heads -- 4.3 Dislocation of relative clauses -- 5. General characterization of relative clauses -- 5.1 Comparison with complement and adjunct clauses -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- Rerences -- Clause embedding strategies in Baure (Arawakan) -- 1. General information -- 2. Typological overview -- 3. Clause combining, subordination, and clause embedding in Baure -- 4. Embedded clauses.

4.1 Relative clauses marked by -no 'nmlz' -- 4.2 Relative clauses marked by -ri 'Pnmlz' -- 4.3 Complement clauses marked by -cho 'ptcp' -- 4.4 Comparison of embedding strategies -- 4.5 Complex embedding -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Subordinate clauses, switch-reference, and tail-head linkage in Cavineña narratives -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Cavineña: Some morphosyntactic background -- 2.1 Main clauses -- 2.2 Subordinate clauses -- 3. Temporal subordinate clauses -- 3.1 Non-finite temporal same-subject clause -- 3.2 Finite temporal different-subject clause -- 3.3 Adverbially-used relative clauses -- 4. Variation on a theme: Formal variants of THL in Cavineña -- 5. Cavineña THL and processing ease -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Appendix -- Illustrative text -- Referring to states and events -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Basic main clause structure -- 2.1 The major components of main clauses -- 2.2 Argument encoding and alignment -- 2.3 Verbal voice marking -- 3. Referential phrases -- 3.1 Articles -- 3.2 Verbs in RPs -- 3.3 Possessor encoding -- 4. Nouns and verbs -- 5. Subordinate clauses -- 5.1 Types and functions of subordinate clauses -- 5.2 Subordinate derivation: Nominalization or lexical aspect? -- 5.3 Argument structure and alignment in subordinate phrases -- 5.4 Voice marking on subordinate predicates -- 5.5 The article in subordinate phrases -- 6. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Semantic and grammatical integration in Yurakaré subordination -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 General data -- 2. Defining subordination -- 3. Clause combinations in Yurakaré -- 3.1 Serial-verb constructions -- 3.2 Deranked clauses with a subordination marker -- 3.3 Balanced clauses with a subordination marker -- 4. Conceptual integration and clause integration -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References.

Subordination in Cholón -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Stems, prefixes, and suffixes -- 2.1 Simple stems -- 2.2 Complex stems -- 2.3 Derivation -- 2.4 Person marking -- 2.5 TAM -- 2.6 Excursus on the copula -- 2.7 Verb structures: A summary -- 3. Subordinate clauses -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Complement clauses -- 3.2.1 Subject clauses -- 3.2.2 Object clauses -- 3.2.3 Nominal predicate clauses -- 3.3 Relative clauses -- 3.3.1 Nominalizers -eč, -lam, -ŋo, -wuč -- 3.3.2 Demonstratives iŋko, into-ŋko and ko, and the indefinite pronoun ol -- 3.3.3 Finite verb forms -- 3.4 Adverbial clauses -- 3.4.1 Causal clauses -- 3.4.2 Purposive clauses -- 3.4.3 Temporal clauses -- 3.4.4 Resultative clauses -- 3.4.5 Other adverbial clauses -- 3.4.6 Hypothetical clauses -- 3.4.7 Concessive and conditional clauses -- 3.5 Excursus on nominalizers, (nominalizing) subordinators and subordinate clauses -- 4. Conclusion: Synoptic overview -- 4.1 Subordination without case marking -- 4.2 Subordination with case marking -- Abbreviations -- References -- Cofán subordinate clauses in a typology of subordination -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Cofán -- 1.2 Aim of this paper -- 2. Subordination from a cross-linguistic perspective -- 2.1 Balanced and deranked subordinate clauses -- 2.2 Cristofaro 2003 -- 2.3 Malchukov 2004 -- 2.4 Cliticized subordinating conjunctions -- 3. Cofán main and subordinate clauses -- 4. Subordination stategies in Cofán -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Balanced subordinate clauses -- 4.2.1 cho clauses -- 4.2.2 =pa and =si clauses -- 4.2.3 Case and/or definiteness marked subordinate clauses -- 4.2.3.1 =ma and =ve subordinate clauses -- 4.2.3.2 =ni, =ni=ja/=ta and =ja/=ta clauses -- 4.3 Deranked subordinate clauses -- 4.3.1 -ye clauses -- 4.3.2 -'su clauses -- 4.3.3 -pa nominalizations -- 4.4 Summary -- 5. Discussion of the data from a typological perspective.

5.1 The coding of the participants -- 5.2 The coding of the verb -- 5.3 The expression of case -- 6. Summary and conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Relative clauses in Ecuadorian Quechua -- 1. Overview -- 2. The basic nominalizing suffixes and relative clause formation in Imbabura Quechua -- 3. Dialect variation in Ecuadorian Quechua relative clauses -- 3.1 Preliminary remarks -- 3.2 Historical sources for Ecuadorian Quechua and the situation in other Quechua varieties -- 3.3 Salcedo and Tigua Quechua -- 3.4 Salasaca Quechua -- 3.5 Arajuno (Tena) Quechua -- 3.6 Calderón Quechua -- 4. Theoretical analysis in terms of Optimality Theory -- 4.1 Three main dialect areas -- 4.2 A theoretical account -- 5. Implications for the development of Ecuadorian Quechua -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Participial clauses in Tarma Quechua -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Types of subordination -- 2.1 Adverbial subordination (converbs) -- 2.2 Nominalization and case -- 2.3 Nominalization without case -- 3. Types of nominalization -- 4. The participial clause, a non-standard use of -sha nominalization in Tarma Quechua -- 5. Aspect in participial clauses -- 6. Participial clauses with an encoded object -- 7. A possible model for the absence of ergative behavior in participial clauses -- 8. Quechua participial clauses and the Indo-European absolute construction -- 9. Final semantic characterization of the participial clause in Tarma Quechua -- Abbreviations -- References -- Complex sentences in Uchumataqu in a comparative perspective with Chipaya -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Sociolinguistic and historical aspects -- 1.2 Sources on Uchumataqu -- 1.3 Aim of the paper -- 2. Subordination in Uchumataqu -- 2.1 Adverbial relations -- 2.1.1 Time sequence relations -- 2.1.2 Simultaneity relations -- 2.1.3 Conditional relations -- 2.1.4 Purpose relations.

2.2 Complement relations -- 2.2.1 Action nominaliser -s(i) -- 2.2.2 Multiverb constructions -- 3. Uchumataqu and Chipaya in a comparative perspective -- 3.1 Adverbial relations -- 3.2 Complement relations -- 3.3 Adjectival relations -- 3.4 Preliminary conclusions -- 4. Conclusions -- Abbreviations and symbols -- References -- Author index -- Language index -- Subject index -- The series Typological Studies in Language.

The following article aims at providing an overview of complex sentences in Uchumataqu (Uru), including a brief comparison with subordination devices in the genetically related Chipaya language. The comparison seeks to provide an impression of the similarities and differences between subordination strategies in the two languages, and it will become apparent that there are some considerable differences which show that Uchumataqu and Chipaya represent different morphological types.

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