The Unlikely Buddhologist : Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism.

By: Clower, JasonSeries: Modern Chinese Philosophy SerPublisher: Leiden : BRILL, 2010Copyright date: ©2010Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (295 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789047430810Subject(s): Tiantai Buddhism - InfluenceGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Unlikely Buddhologist : Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New ConfucianismDDC classification: 181/.11 LOC classification: B5234.M674 -- C59 2010ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Chapter One Mou Zongsan, His Times, and His Aims -- The Problem of the Unlikely Buddhologist -- Why Mou Matters -- Interpreting Mou -- The Cultural Context-China's National Crisis and Mou's Generation -- The New Culture and the Attack on Confucianism -- Progress -- Public-Mindedness -- Governing by Educating -- Crisis in the New Culture -- Marxism -- Cultural Conservatives -- Mou and the New Confucians -- The New Confucian Agenda -- The On-Going Life of the Confucian Tradition -- Moral Realism -- Synthesizing Chinese and Western Philosophy -- Science and Democracy -- Mou's Mature Writings -- Goals of Mou's Philosophy -- Vindicate Chinese Philosophy -- Join Chinese and Western Philosophy in Common Enterprise -- Assert Morality in Matter and the Moral Mission of Science -- Help Regenerate China Morally and Politically -- Proclaim Metaphysical Optimism -- Chapter Two "Philosophy" and the Building Blocks of Mou's Universe -- Mou's Notion of "Philosophy" -- Mou the Theologian -- The Building Blocks of Mou's Universe: The "Two-Level Ontology" -- Chapter Three What the Buddha Taught-The Fable of the Five Periods -- The Canonic Buddha and the Canon -- The Buddha's Teaching -- How the Buddha Unveiled His Teaching Progressively -- First Period: Flower Garland Sutra -- Second Period: Hīnayāna Scriptures -- Third Period: Mahāyāna Scriptures -- Fourth Period: The Perfection of Prajñā Scriptures -- Fifth Period: Lotus and Nirvana Sutras -- Chapter Four The Buddhist Philosophers -- Hīnayāna, the Tripitaka Theory -- Nāgārjuna and the "Common Theory" -- Nāgārjuna's Flaws -- The Common Theory as a Formal Type -- The Two "Separation Theories" -- Yogācāra: The Beginning or "Deluded Mind" Separation Theory -- The Mature Separation Theory -- Paramārtha and the History of the Mature Separation Theory.
Buddhas and Buddha-Nature in the Mature Separation Theory -- The Theory's Advances and Failings -- Huayan Representatives of the Mature Separation Theory -- The Complete or Perfect Theory -- Spiritual Progress according to the Perfect Theory -- The Two Topics of Buddhist Philosophy: Buddha-Nature and Prajñā -- The Inclusiveness of the Perfect Theory -- The Chan Tradition -- Chapter Five Where Buddhists Go Wrong -- The Orthodox Confucian Tradition according to Mou -- Heaven "Creates" the Universe -- Heaven Also Dwells in Us -- Where Buddhism Falls Short -- Chapter Six So What Good is Buddhism? -- Separation Theory and Perfect Theory as Formal Types -- How Buddhists Led the Way -- Confucian Perfect Theory and Separation Theories -- What Good is a Perfect Theory? -- Chapter Seven Toward an Appraisal of Mou's Use of Buddhist Philosophy -- Mou as Historian of Philosophy -- Mou the Dogmatic -- Mou's Interpretation of Buddhism -- The Mystery of Variegated Dharmas -- Guaranteeing the Existence of All Things -- Universal Buddhahood and the Beginning Separation Theory -- Mou's General Criticisms of Buddhism -- Ontological Substance and Moral Law -- The Socio-Political Criticism -- Mou's Ambivalent Ecumenism -- Mou's Perfect Theory Model -- Coherence -- Fung's First Argument: On Non-Discriminating Statements -- Fung's Second Argument: On Critique -- Fung's Third Argument: Linguistic Contortion -- Fung's Interpretation: Non-Rationality or Mystagogy -- Obscurantism and Esotericism in the Perfect Theory -- The Door to Antinomianism -- Is Mou Worth the Trouble? -- Works Cited -- Index.
Summary: This highly accessible book provides a comprehensive unpacking and interpretation, suitable for students and scholars in all fields, of towering philosopher Mou Zongsan's understanding of Buddhist thought and his Confucian appropriation of Tiantai Buddhist ideas.
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Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Chapter One Mou Zongsan, His Times, and His Aims -- The Problem of the Unlikely Buddhologist -- Why Mou Matters -- Interpreting Mou -- The Cultural Context-China's National Crisis and Mou's Generation -- The New Culture and the Attack on Confucianism -- Progress -- Public-Mindedness -- Governing by Educating -- Crisis in the New Culture -- Marxism -- Cultural Conservatives -- Mou and the New Confucians -- The New Confucian Agenda -- The On-Going Life of the Confucian Tradition -- Moral Realism -- Synthesizing Chinese and Western Philosophy -- Science and Democracy -- Mou's Mature Writings -- Goals of Mou's Philosophy -- Vindicate Chinese Philosophy -- Join Chinese and Western Philosophy in Common Enterprise -- Assert Morality in Matter and the Moral Mission of Science -- Help Regenerate China Morally and Politically -- Proclaim Metaphysical Optimism -- Chapter Two "Philosophy" and the Building Blocks of Mou's Universe -- Mou's Notion of "Philosophy" -- Mou the Theologian -- The Building Blocks of Mou's Universe: The "Two-Level Ontology" -- Chapter Three What the Buddha Taught-The Fable of the Five Periods -- The Canonic Buddha and the Canon -- The Buddha's Teaching -- How the Buddha Unveiled His Teaching Progressively -- First Period: Flower Garland Sutra -- Second Period: Hīnayāna Scriptures -- Third Period: Mahāyāna Scriptures -- Fourth Period: The Perfection of Prajñā Scriptures -- Fifth Period: Lotus and Nirvana Sutras -- Chapter Four The Buddhist Philosophers -- Hīnayāna, the Tripitaka Theory -- Nāgārjuna and the "Common Theory" -- Nāgārjuna's Flaws -- The Common Theory as a Formal Type -- The Two "Separation Theories" -- Yogācāra: The Beginning or "Deluded Mind" Separation Theory -- The Mature Separation Theory -- Paramārtha and the History of the Mature Separation Theory.

Buddhas and Buddha-Nature in the Mature Separation Theory -- The Theory's Advances and Failings -- Huayan Representatives of the Mature Separation Theory -- The Complete or Perfect Theory -- Spiritual Progress according to the Perfect Theory -- The Two Topics of Buddhist Philosophy: Buddha-Nature and Prajñā -- The Inclusiveness of the Perfect Theory -- The Chan Tradition -- Chapter Five Where Buddhists Go Wrong -- The Orthodox Confucian Tradition according to Mou -- Heaven "Creates" the Universe -- Heaven Also Dwells in Us -- Where Buddhism Falls Short -- Chapter Six So What Good is Buddhism? -- Separation Theory and Perfect Theory as Formal Types -- How Buddhists Led the Way -- Confucian Perfect Theory and Separation Theories -- What Good is a Perfect Theory? -- Chapter Seven Toward an Appraisal of Mou's Use of Buddhist Philosophy -- Mou as Historian of Philosophy -- Mou the Dogmatic -- Mou's Interpretation of Buddhism -- The Mystery of Variegated Dharmas -- Guaranteeing the Existence of All Things -- Universal Buddhahood and the Beginning Separation Theory -- Mou's General Criticisms of Buddhism -- Ontological Substance and Moral Law -- The Socio-Political Criticism -- Mou's Ambivalent Ecumenism -- Mou's Perfect Theory Model -- Coherence -- Fung's First Argument: On Non-Discriminating Statements -- Fung's Second Argument: On Critique -- Fung's Third Argument: Linguistic Contortion -- Fung's Interpretation: Non-Rationality or Mystagogy -- Obscurantism and Esotericism in the Perfect Theory -- The Door to Antinomianism -- Is Mou Worth the Trouble? -- Works Cited -- Index.

This highly accessible book provides a comprehensive unpacking and interpretation, suitable for students and scholars in all fields, of towering philosopher Mou Zongsan's understanding of Buddhist thought and his Confucian appropriation of Tiantai Buddhist ideas.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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