Smart Things : Ubiquitous Computing User Experience Design.

By: Kuniavsky, MikePublisher: San Francisco : Elsevier Science & Technology, 2010Copyright date: ©2010Description: 1 online resource (331 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780080954080Subject(s): Ubiquitous computing.;User interfaces (Computer systems);Human-computer interactionGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Smart Things : Ubiquitous Computing User Experience DesignDDC classification: 004.01/9 LOC classification: QA76.5915 -- .K86 2010ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Cover -- Smart Things Ubiquitous Computing User Experience Design -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Preface -- Who This Book is For -- What This Book is -- What This Book is Not -- How This Book is Organized -- Acknowledgments -- Part I Frameworks -- Chapter 1 Introduction: The Middle of Moore's Law -- 1.1 The hidden middle of moore's law -- 1.2 Ubiquitous computing -- 1.3 The need for design -- Chapter 2 What is User Experience Design and, Who Creates it? -- 2.1 A definition of user experience -- 2.2 Extending garrett's elements of user experience -- 2.3 Design disciplines -- 2.4 The importance of context -- Chapter 3 Interaction Metaphors -- 3.1 Ubicomp User Experience Metaphors, a Catalog -- 3.2 Designing with Metaphors -- Chapter 4 Information is a Material -- 4.1 A Shift in Design Thinking -- 4.2 Information as an Agile Material -- 4.3 The Properties of Information -- 4.4 Working with the material properties of information -- Chapter 5 The Whirlpool Centralpark™ Refrigerator: The Designof an Accessory Port -- 5.1 A short History of the Smart Fridge -- 5.2 Why Did the Smart Refrigerators Fail? -- 5.3 Whirlpool's Centralpark Refrigerator -- 5.4 Lessons From the Design Process -- Chapter 6 Information Shadows -- 6.1 An early Success in Item-level Identification -- 6.2 Information Shadows -- 6.3 Point-at Things -- 6.4 The Internet of Things -- 6.5 Design with Information Shadows -- Chapter 7 Clickables: Toys and Information Shadows -- 7.1 Background: Bracelets, Collectibles, and Storytelling -- 7.2 Clickables -- Chapter 8 Devices are Service Avatars -- 8.1 Networks shift value to information -- 8.2 Devices are service avatars -- 8.3 Avatar and service co-design -- Chapter 9 The iPod: A Service Avatar -- 9.1 Background: digital Music Players Before the IPod -- 9.2 The IPod and the itunes Service -- 9.3 Avatars and appliances.
Chapter 10 Applianceness -- 10.1 Applianceness -- 10.2 Appliance user experience design -- 10.3 Conclusion -- Chapter 11 Roomwizard: An Appliance for Office Society -- 11.1 Background -- 11.2 Roomwizard user experience design -- 11.3 Since roomwizard's release -- Chapter 12 Scales of Experience -- 12.1 Background: just how big is an experience? -- 12.2 A power-of-ten scale -- 12.3 Multiscale user experience design -- 12.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 13 Plasma Poster: Unifying Work Cultures with a Digital Poster -- 13.1 Background: ambient multiscale community displays -- 13.2 Plasma poster user experience -- 13.3 Process -- 13.4 Conclusion -- Part II Techniques -- Chapter 14 Observation and Ideation -- 14.1 Observation -- 14.2 Ideation -- Chapter 15 Simulation and Sketching -- 15.1 Simulation -- 15.2 Sketching user experiences -- Chapter 16 Nabaztag, an Ambiguous Avatar -- 16.1 A rabbit is magic because of how it behaves -- 16.2 A mass-market design probe -- 16.3 Design principles -- 16.4 A device-service revenue model -- 16.5 Design process -- 16.6 User research -- 16.7 Desire lines -- 16.8 People and positions -- 16.9 Ambiguous success and follow-up products -- Chapter 17 Augmentations and Mashups -- 17.1 Augmentation -- 17.2 Mashups between devices and web services -- 17.3 Conclusion -- Chapter 18 Common Design Challenges -- 18.1 Introducing novel experiences -- 18.2 Design for adaptation -- 18.3 Creating experience continuity across avatars -- 18.4 Device interconnection -- 18.5 Respecting boundaries -- Chapter 19 From Invisible Computing to Everyware -- 19.1 The user experience designer's role -- 19.2 The user experience designer's responsibility -- 19.3 What's next? -- References -- Index.
Summary: The world of smart shoes, appliances, and phones is already here, but the practice of user experience (UX) design for ubiquitous computing is still relatively new. Design companies like IDEO and frogdesign are regularly asked to design products that unify software interaction, device design and service design -- which are all the key components of ubiquitous computing UX -- and practicing designers need a way to tackle practical challenges of design. Theory is not enough for them -- luckily the industry is now mature enough to have tried and tested best practices and case studies from the field. Smart Things presents a problem-solving approach to addressing designers' needs and concentrates on process, rather than technological detail, to keep from being quickly outdated. It pays close attention to the capabilities and limitations of the medium in question and discusses the tradeoffs and challenges of design in a commercial environment. Divided into two sections,  frameworks and techniques, the book discusses broad design methods and case studies that reflect key aspects of these approaches. The book then presents a set of techniques highly valuable to a practicing designer. It is intentionally not a comprehensive tutorial of user-centered design'as that is covered in many other books'but it is a handful of techniques useful when designing ubiquitous computing user experiences. In short, Smart Things gives its readers both the "why" of this kind of design and the "how," in well-defined chunks. * Tackles design of products in the post-Web world where computers no longer have to be monolithic, expensive general-purpose devices * Features broad frameworks and processes, practical advice to help approach specifics, and techniques for the unique design challenges * Presents case studies that describe, in detail, how others have solved problems,Summary: managed trade-offs, and met successes.
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Cover -- Smart Things Ubiquitous Computing User Experience Design -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Preface -- Who This Book is For -- What This Book is -- What This Book is Not -- How This Book is Organized -- Acknowledgments -- Part I Frameworks -- Chapter 1 Introduction: The Middle of Moore's Law -- 1.1 The hidden middle of moore's law -- 1.2 Ubiquitous computing -- 1.3 The need for design -- Chapter 2 What is User Experience Design and, Who Creates it? -- 2.1 A definition of user experience -- 2.2 Extending garrett's elements of user experience -- 2.3 Design disciplines -- 2.4 The importance of context -- Chapter 3 Interaction Metaphors -- 3.1 Ubicomp User Experience Metaphors, a Catalog -- 3.2 Designing with Metaphors -- Chapter 4 Information is a Material -- 4.1 A Shift in Design Thinking -- 4.2 Information as an Agile Material -- 4.3 The Properties of Information -- 4.4 Working with the material properties of information -- Chapter 5 The Whirlpool Centralpark™ Refrigerator: The Designof an Accessory Port -- 5.1 A short History of the Smart Fridge -- 5.2 Why Did the Smart Refrigerators Fail? -- 5.3 Whirlpool's Centralpark Refrigerator -- 5.4 Lessons From the Design Process -- Chapter 6 Information Shadows -- 6.1 An early Success in Item-level Identification -- 6.2 Information Shadows -- 6.3 Point-at Things -- 6.4 The Internet of Things -- 6.5 Design with Information Shadows -- Chapter 7 Clickables: Toys and Information Shadows -- 7.1 Background: Bracelets, Collectibles, and Storytelling -- 7.2 Clickables -- Chapter 8 Devices are Service Avatars -- 8.1 Networks shift value to information -- 8.2 Devices are service avatars -- 8.3 Avatar and service co-design -- Chapter 9 The iPod: A Service Avatar -- 9.1 Background: digital Music Players Before the IPod -- 9.2 The IPod and the itunes Service -- 9.3 Avatars and appliances.

Chapter 10 Applianceness -- 10.1 Applianceness -- 10.2 Appliance user experience design -- 10.3 Conclusion -- Chapter 11 Roomwizard: An Appliance for Office Society -- 11.1 Background -- 11.2 Roomwizard user experience design -- 11.3 Since roomwizard's release -- Chapter 12 Scales of Experience -- 12.1 Background: just how big is an experience? -- 12.2 A power-of-ten scale -- 12.3 Multiscale user experience design -- 12.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 13 Plasma Poster: Unifying Work Cultures with a Digital Poster -- 13.1 Background: ambient multiscale community displays -- 13.2 Plasma poster user experience -- 13.3 Process -- 13.4 Conclusion -- Part II Techniques -- Chapter 14 Observation and Ideation -- 14.1 Observation -- 14.2 Ideation -- Chapter 15 Simulation and Sketching -- 15.1 Simulation -- 15.2 Sketching user experiences -- Chapter 16 Nabaztag, an Ambiguous Avatar -- 16.1 A rabbit is magic because of how it behaves -- 16.2 A mass-market design probe -- 16.3 Design principles -- 16.4 A device-service revenue model -- 16.5 Design process -- 16.6 User research -- 16.7 Desire lines -- 16.8 People and positions -- 16.9 Ambiguous success and follow-up products -- Chapter 17 Augmentations and Mashups -- 17.1 Augmentation -- 17.2 Mashups between devices and web services -- 17.3 Conclusion -- Chapter 18 Common Design Challenges -- 18.1 Introducing novel experiences -- 18.2 Design for adaptation -- 18.3 Creating experience continuity across avatars -- 18.4 Device interconnection -- 18.5 Respecting boundaries -- Chapter 19 From Invisible Computing to Everyware -- 19.1 The user experience designer's role -- 19.2 The user experience designer's responsibility -- 19.3 What's next? -- References -- Index.

The world of smart shoes, appliances, and phones is already here, but the practice of user experience (UX) design for ubiquitous computing is still relatively new. Design companies like IDEO and frogdesign are regularly asked to design products that unify software interaction, device design and service design -- which are all the key components of ubiquitous computing UX -- and practicing designers need a way to tackle practical challenges of design. Theory is not enough for them -- luckily the industry is now mature enough to have tried and tested best practices and case studies from the field. Smart Things presents a problem-solving approach to addressing designers' needs and concentrates on process, rather than technological detail, to keep from being quickly outdated. It pays close attention to the capabilities and limitations of the medium in question and discusses the tradeoffs and challenges of design in a commercial environment. Divided into two sections,  frameworks and techniques, the book discusses broad design methods and case studies that reflect key aspects of these approaches. The book then presents a set of techniques highly valuable to a practicing designer. It is intentionally not a comprehensive tutorial of user-centered design'as that is covered in many other books'but it is a handful of techniques useful when designing ubiquitous computing user experiences. In short, Smart Things gives its readers both the "why" of this kind of design and the "how," in well-defined chunks. * Tackles design of products in the post-Web world where computers no longer have to be monolithic, expensive general-purpose devices * Features broad frameworks and processes, practical advice to help approach specifics, and techniques for the unique design challenges * Presents case studies that describe, in detail, how others have solved problems,

managed trade-offs, and met successes.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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