Vocalize to Localize.

By: Abry, ChristianContributor(s): Vilain, Anne | Schwartz, Jean-LucSeries: Benjamins Current Topics SerPublisher: Amsterdam/Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (324 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027289513Subject(s): Oral communication.;Visual communicationGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Vocalize to LocalizeDDC classification: 302.2/242 LOC classification: P95.V63 2009Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Vocalize to Localize -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Foreword: Vocalize to Localize -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Vocalize to Localize: Just a speech scientist's bias? -- Vocalizing to localize predators by conspecific calls -- First gestural references with vocal/gestural predicates? -- Integrating prelinguistic calls into proto-language: Vocal alarm predicates + gestural references? -- The missing link: A 'referential and conceptual feces'? -- A Sign Language case of reference lumped with the predicate (and beyond) -- Commands = predicates with implicit references, and 'fossils' -- Coupling with pointing, and without leaving the 'royal road to language' unpaved -- Neural 'that-path' and 'stabil-loop': Two pieces in the puzzle of language evolution -- The ultimate lesson from meerkats: No more pure armchair stories! -- References -- About the authors -- Vocalize to localize -- Introduction -- Methods -- Posture of alarm caller depending on context -- Response to different alarm call types -- Response to playback experiments -- Statistics -- Results -- Posture of alarm caller depending on the call type elicited by the predators -- Response to naturally occurring alarm calls -- Response to playback experiments of alarm calls -- Discussion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- About the authors -- Mirror neurons, gestures and language evolution -- Introductory remarks -- Vocal communication in primates and its limitations for language evolution -- Gestural communication as a suitable substrate for language evolution -- How the brain codes gestures -- Action vs. movement -- Mirror neurons and gestural communication -- Homology between F5 and Broca's area -- Gestures and sound association for the evolution of human speech -- Acknowledgement -- References -- About the authors.
Lateralization of communicative signals in nonhuman primates and the hypothesis of the gestural origin of language -- The gestural hypothesis of speech origin and animal models -- Gestures, speech and hemispheric control in adults, children, infants and fetuses -- Evidence of structural and functional asymmetries in nonhuman primates -- Evidence for neuroanatomical asymmetries in the brain of apes -- Behavioral evidence of asymmetries in the perception and production of auditory communications -- Animal communication and intentions -- Laterality and manual gestures in intentional communication -- Other kinds of evidence in nonhuman primates -- Mirror neurons in the monkey brain -- Some functional differences between animal communication and human language -- Cortical control of nonhuman primates' vocalizations -- Theoretical implications -- Acknowledgments -- References -- About the Author -- Manual deixis in apes and humans -- Nonverbal reference defined -- What is intentional communication? -- What is a point? -- What does pointing do? -- Environmental correlates of pointing in apes and humans -- Implications for the evolution of manual deixis -- Acknowledgement -- References -- About the author -- Neandertal vocal tract -- 1. A largely widespread but controversial theory -- 1.1 An unlikely skull reconstruction -- 1.2 Unrealistic vocal tract shapes and thus unrealistic vowel triangle -- 2. A flexible articulatory-acoustic vocal tract model -- 3. Maximal Vowel Space and the point vowels /i a u/ -- 3.1 The Maximal Vowel Space and compensation phenomena -- 3.2 Prototypes for /i a u/ in the MVS -- 4. Influence of the Larynx Height Index on the Maximal Vowel Space -- 5. Proposals for /i/, /a/, and /u/ prototypes for different Larynx Height Indexes -- 6. Discussion and conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the first author.
Interweaving protosign and protospeech -- Language: What is to be explained? -- What would it mean to explain the evolution of human language? -- The mirror system approach to the evolution of human language -- MacNeilage's frame/content theory: A critique -- The doctrine of the expanding spiral -- Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- References -- About the author -- The Frame/Content theory of evolution of speech -- Introduction -- F/C theory: Relations between phylogeny and ontogeny -- The Origin of the Word -- Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny? -- Neurological aspects of F/C theory -- Arbib's gestural origins alternative -- Summary -- References -- About the authors -- Intentional communication and the anterior cingulate cortex -- A second-order neural structure? -- Human specificity of the limbic structures -- Anterior cingulate cortex - A controversial architecture -- Other macrostructural characteristics -- Microstructural characteristics -- Anatomical and functional interconnections of the anterior cingulate cortex -- Anterior cingulate cortex and communication -- Social bonding -- Control of vocalizations -- Neuroimaging studies of linguistic tasks -- Lesion data and the initiation of speech -- Anterior cingulate cortex and social cognition -- Neuroimaging data -- Joint attention and the anterior cingulate cortex -- Conclusions -- Credits for reprinted Figures -- References -- About the author -- Gestural-vocal deixis and representational skills in early language development -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Methodological issues -- 2. Method -- 2.1 Participants and data collection procedure -- 2.2 Coding and analysis -- 2.3 Reliability -- 3. Results and discussion -- 3.1 One-element gestural and vocal utterances -- 3.2 Two-element utterances -- 3.3 Multi-element utterances: Crossmodal vs. vocal.
3.4 The temporal relationship between gestures, vocalizations and words -- 4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Note -- References -- About the authors -- Building a talking baby robot -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Linking perception and action in speech robotics -- 1.2 A viewpoint on speech development -- 2. The vocalizing baby robot -- 2.1 The articulatory model -- 2.2 The sensory models -- 2.3 The model of sensori-motor learning -- 3. Simulating vocal exploration before and at the beginning of babbling -- 3.1 Phonetic data -- 3.2 Acoustic framing -- 3.3 Articulatory framing -- 3.4 Geometric framing -- 3.5 Conclusion -- 4. Simulating early vocal imitation -- 4.1 An overview of Kuhl and Meltzoff's experiment on early vocal imitation -- 4.2 Specifying the model -- 4.3 Learning the model -- 4.4 Implementing auditory and audio-visual imitation -- 4.5 A and AV imitation results -- 4.6 Conclusion -- 5. Perspectives in the study of ontogeny and phylogeny -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the authors -- Aspects of descriptive, referential, and information structure in phrasal semantics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Sentence to meaning mapping (SM2) model -- 2.1 Input representations -- 2.2 Learning word meanings: Lexical semantics -- 2.3 Mapping sentence to meaning: Phrasal semantics -- 3. Model performance -- 3.1 Aspects of the descriptive and information tiers -- 3.2 Aspects of referential tier and beyond -- 3.3 Robot language acquisition in the construction framework -- 4. Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the author -- Appendix: Sentence type data base -- First in, last out? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Related frontal impairments of speech, language and action -- 2.1 Aphasic speech automatisms -- 3. Discussion: From automatisms to syntax in a frontal speech-action system -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the author.
Name index -- Subject index -- The series Benjamins Current Topics.
Summary: Vocalize-to-Localize? Meerkats do it for specific predators… And babies point with their index finger toward targets of interest at about nine months, well before using language-specific that-demonstratives. With what-interrogatives they are universal and, as relativizers and complementizers, play an important role in grammar construction. Some alarm calls in nonhumans display more than mere localization: semantics and even syntax. Instead of telling another monomodal story about language origin, in this volume advocates of representational gestures, semantically transparent, but with a problematic route toward speech, meet advocates of speech, with a problematic route toward the lexicon. The present meeting resulted in contributions by 23 specialists in the behaviour and brain of humans, including comparative studies in child development and nonhuman primates, aphasiology and robotics. The near future will tell us if the present crosstalk - between researchers in auditory and in visual communication systems - will lead to a more integrative framework for understanding the emergence of babbling and pointing, two types of neural control whose coordination could pave the way toward the word and syntax.The contributions to this volume were previously published as Interaction Studies 5:3 (2004) and 6:2 (2005).
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan
Available EBKAF00045948
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal
Available EBKNP00045948
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan

Access a wide range of magazines and books using Pressreader and Ebook central.

Enjoy your reading, British Council Sudan.

Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia
Available
Total holds: 0

Vocalize to Localize -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Foreword: Vocalize to Localize -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Vocalize to Localize: Just a speech scientist's bias? -- Vocalizing to localize predators by conspecific calls -- First gestural references with vocal/gestural predicates? -- Integrating prelinguistic calls into proto-language: Vocal alarm predicates + gestural references? -- The missing link: A 'referential and conceptual feces'? -- A Sign Language case of reference lumped with the predicate (and beyond) -- Commands = predicates with implicit references, and 'fossils' -- Coupling with pointing, and without leaving the 'royal road to language' unpaved -- Neural 'that-path' and 'stabil-loop': Two pieces in the puzzle of language evolution -- The ultimate lesson from meerkats: No more pure armchair stories! -- References -- About the authors -- Vocalize to localize -- Introduction -- Methods -- Posture of alarm caller depending on context -- Response to different alarm call types -- Response to playback experiments -- Statistics -- Results -- Posture of alarm caller depending on the call type elicited by the predators -- Response to naturally occurring alarm calls -- Response to playback experiments of alarm calls -- Discussion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- About the authors -- Mirror neurons, gestures and language evolution -- Introductory remarks -- Vocal communication in primates and its limitations for language evolution -- Gestural communication as a suitable substrate for language evolution -- How the brain codes gestures -- Action vs. movement -- Mirror neurons and gestural communication -- Homology between F5 and Broca's area -- Gestures and sound association for the evolution of human speech -- Acknowledgement -- References -- About the authors.

Lateralization of communicative signals in nonhuman primates and the hypothesis of the gestural origin of language -- The gestural hypothesis of speech origin and animal models -- Gestures, speech and hemispheric control in adults, children, infants and fetuses -- Evidence of structural and functional asymmetries in nonhuman primates -- Evidence for neuroanatomical asymmetries in the brain of apes -- Behavioral evidence of asymmetries in the perception and production of auditory communications -- Animal communication and intentions -- Laterality and manual gestures in intentional communication -- Other kinds of evidence in nonhuman primates -- Mirror neurons in the monkey brain -- Some functional differences between animal communication and human language -- Cortical control of nonhuman primates' vocalizations -- Theoretical implications -- Acknowledgments -- References -- About the Author -- Manual deixis in apes and humans -- Nonverbal reference defined -- What is intentional communication? -- What is a point? -- What does pointing do? -- Environmental correlates of pointing in apes and humans -- Implications for the evolution of manual deixis -- Acknowledgement -- References -- About the author -- Neandertal vocal tract -- 1. A largely widespread but controversial theory -- 1.1 An unlikely skull reconstruction -- 1.2 Unrealistic vocal tract shapes and thus unrealistic vowel triangle -- 2. A flexible articulatory-acoustic vocal tract model -- 3. Maximal Vowel Space and the point vowels /i a u/ -- 3.1 The Maximal Vowel Space and compensation phenomena -- 3.2 Prototypes for /i a u/ in the MVS -- 4. Influence of the Larynx Height Index on the Maximal Vowel Space -- 5. Proposals for /i/, /a/, and /u/ prototypes for different Larynx Height Indexes -- 6. Discussion and conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the first author.

Interweaving protosign and protospeech -- Language: What is to be explained? -- What would it mean to explain the evolution of human language? -- The mirror system approach to the evolution of human language -- MacNeilage's frame/content theory: A critique -- The doctrine of the expanding spiral -- Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- References -- About the author -- The Frame/Content theory of evolution of speech -- Introduction -- F/C theory: Relations between phylogeny and ontogeny -- The Origin of the Word -- Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny? -- Neurological aspects of F/C theory -- Arbib's gestural origins alternative -- Summary -- References -- About the authors -- Intentional communication and the anterior cingulate cortex -- A second-order neural structure? -- Human specificity of the limbic structures -- Anterior cingulate cortex - A controversial architecture -- Other macrostructural characteristics -- Microstructural characteristics -- Anatomical and functional interconnections of the anterior cingulate cortex -- Anterior cingulate cortex and communication -- Social bonding -- Control of vocalizations -- Neuroimaging studies of linguistic tasks -- Lesion data and the initiation of speech -- Anterior cingulate cortex and social cognition -- Neuroimaging data -- Joint attention and the anterior cingulate cortex -- Conclusions -- Credits for reprinted Figures -- References -- About the author -- Gestural-vocal deixis and representational skills in early language development -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Methodological issues -- 2. Method -- 2.1 Participants and data collection procedure -- 2.2 Coding and analysis -- 2.3 Reliability -- 3. Results and discussion -- 3.1 One-element gestural and vocal utterances -- 3.2 Two-element utterances -- 3.3 Multi-element utterances: Crossmodal vs. vocal.

3.4 The temporal relationship between gestures, vocalizations and words -- 4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Note -- References -- About the authors -- Building a talking baby robot -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Linking perception and action in speech robotics -- 1.2 A viewpoint on speech development -- 2. The vocalizing baby robot -- 2.1 The articulatory model -- 2.2 The sensory models -- 2.3 The model of sensori-motor learning -- 3. Simulating vocal exploration before and at the beginning of babbling -- 3.1 Phonetic data -- 3.2 Acoustic framing -- 3.3 Articulatory framing -- 3.4 Geometric framing -- 3.5 Conclusion -- 4. Simulating early vocal imitation -- 4.1 An overview of Kuhl and Meltzoff's experiment on early vocal imitation -- 4.2 Specifying the model -- 4.3 Learning the model -- 4.4 Implementing auditory and audio-visual imitation -- 4.5 A and AV imitation results -- 4.6 Conclusion -- 5. Perspectives in the study of ontogeny and phylogeny -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the authors -- Aspects of descriptive, referential, and information structure in phrasal semantics -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Sentence to meaning mapping (SM2) model -- 2.1 Input representations -- 2.2 Learning word meanings: Lexical semantics -- 2.3 Mapping sentence to meaning: Phrasal semantics -- 3. Model performance -- 3.1 Aspects of the descriptive and information tiers -- 3.2 Aspects of referential tier and beyond -- 3.3 Robot language acquisition in the construction framework -- 4. Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the author -- Appendix: Sentence type data base -- First in, last out? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Related frontal impairments of speech, language and action -- 2.1 Aphasic speech automatisms -- 3. Discussion: From automatisms to syntax in a frontal speech-action system -- Acknowledgements -- References -- About the author.

Name index -- Subject index -- The series Benjamins Current Topics.

Vocalize-to-Localize? Meerkats do it for specific predators… And babies point with their index finger toward targets of interest at about nine months, well before using language-specific that-demonstratives. With what-interrogatives they are universal and, as relativizers and complementizers, play an important role in grammar construction. Some alarm calls in nonhumans display more than mere localization: semantics and even syntax. Instead of telling another monomodal story about language origin, in this volume advocates of representational gestures, semantically transparent, but with a problematic route toward speech, meet advocates of speech, with a problematic route toward the lexicon. The present meeting resulted in contributions by 23 specialists in the behaviour and brain of humans, including comparative studies in child development and nonhuman primates, aphasiology and robotics. The near future will tell us if the present crosstalk - between researchers in auditory and in visual communication systems - will lead to a more integrative framework for understanding the emergence of babbling and pointing, two types of neural control whose coordination could pave the way toward the word and syntax.The contributions to this volume were previously published as Interaction Studies 5:3 (2004) and 6:2 (2005).

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.