Speaking of Colors and Odors.

By: Plümacher, MartinaContributor(s): Holz, PeterPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2007Copyright date: ©2007Description: 1 online resource (251 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027292179Subject(s): Language and color.;Language and smellGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Speaking of Colors and OdorsDDC classification: 418 LOC classification: P120.C65 -- S68 2007ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Speaking of Colors and Odors -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Speaking of colors and odors -- 1. Introduction to the topic -- 2. The contributions in the context of previous research -- 3. On the contributions to this volume -- 4. Acknowledgements -- References -- Color, smell, and language -- 1. Is the propositional nature of language an Aristotelian myth? -- 2. Is there a language of memory? -- What does this entail for semantics? -- 3. Is there an architecture of sensibility and sense? -- 4. Sensation vs. communication: A field of conflict -- 4.1. Perception and communication in olfaction -- 4.2. Perception and communication of colors -- 4.3. Some consequences -- 5. Is the evolution of symbolic communication based on human sensibility? -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- How can language cope with color? -- 1. Language and color: Is there a problem? -- 2. Language and color: There is a problem! -- 3. A short description of some principles of color vision -- 4. A short description of some principles of brain function -- 5. Methods to study the function of the brain -- 6. Single cells, neuronal assemblies, and behavior -- 7. Single cells versus cell assemblies -- 8. Processing of color information in the nervous system -- 9. Peculiarities of human color perception and naming -- 10. Discrepancies between the physical world and its subjective experience, or perception -- 11. Perception as synthesis of an internal representation, and its relation to language -- 12. Conclusions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Color perception, color description and metaphor -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Colors without a name - color names without color information -- 1.2. Strategies of naming colors and describing color impressions -- 2. Patterns of denoting colors.
2.1. Denotation of a hue in analogy to the typical color of a well-known object -- 2.2. Color naming with regard to dyes and pigments -- 2.3. Relational ordering of colors in the color circle and color sphere -- 2.4. Hybrid forms: Color description with regard to the relational order of colors and to typical colors of objects -- 3. Descriptions of interacting colors -- 3.1. Opposition: warm - cold -- 3.2. Opposition: active - passive -- 3.3. Opposition: soft - strong / pale - intense -- 3.4. Opposition: heavy - light -- 3.5. Opposition: deep - flat -- 3.6. The metaphor of the `rhythm of colors' -- 4. Conclusions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Attractiveness and adornment -- 1. Introduction: Functional cycles and naming -- 2. From composite signals to distanced communication -- 3. Reference to smell in Eipo, Yale, and some other Papuan languages -- 4. Reference to color in Eipo, Yale, and some other Papuan languages -- 5. Conclusion: Signs of danger, signs of beauty -- References -- Color terms between elegance and beauty -- 1. Axiomatic preliminaries -- 2. Color naming with textiles -- 3. Classification of color names for textiles -- 4. Classification of color names for cosmetics -- 5. Language use and color names for textiles -- 5.1. Oral use or customer behavior -- 5.2. Written use -- 6. Consumer behavior and function of color names -- 7. Underlying philosophy and strategy -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Color names and dynamic imagery -- 1. Introductory remarks -- 2. Color classification schemes -- 3. Color names and dynamic imagery -- 4. Complex color terms in advertising - examples from the automobile industry -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- From blue stockings to blue movies -- 1. Introductory remarks -- 2. Research on color terms -- 3. Metonymy as seen within Cognitive Linguistics.
3.1. Color metonymy: Blue - different aspects of meaning -- 3.2. Metonymy vs. metaphor -- 3.3. Radial network of blue metonymies in English -- 4. Connection to newer approaches in foreign language teaching methodology -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Odor memory* -- References -- From psychophysics to semiophysics: Categories as acts of meaning -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Some historical landmarks -- 2.1. From Psychophysics ... -- 2.2. … to Cognitive sciences: Basic color terms -- 2.3. Cognitive categories and naming -- 3. Odors -- 3.1. Odors and psychophysics -- 3.2. Cognitive approach and categories of smells -- 4. Linguistic devices for odors -- 4.1. The veridical label revisited -- 4.2. A brief summary of the data from Dubois and Rouby (2002) -- 4.3. Linguistic resources for the description of odors -- 5. Noises and sounds -- 6. Back to colors -- 7. Concluding remarks -- References -- Cognition, olfaction and linguistic creativity* -- 1. Sketch of the problem -- 2. Hedonistic judgments as basic cognitive categories in olfaction -- 3. Common linguistic constructions to describe smells -- 3.1. Iconic reference -- 3.2. Indexical reference -- 3.3. Special cases: Metaphorical reference -- 4. Why language cannot properly cope with olfaction -- 5. Does it make scents? - The poetic function of language in cologne advertising -- 5.1. Theoretical and methodological terminology - six functions of language -- 5.2. The referential function -- 5.3. The conative function -- 5.4. The poetic function and the projection principle -- 6. Hypothesis -- 7. Synesthesia: Neuropsychological capacity vs. poetic device -- 7.1. Some remarks on the modalities of sensory perception -- 8. Empirical evidence -- 8.1. The corpus -- 8.2. Synesthetic constructions in cologne advertisements -- 8.3. Lexical level: Immediate synesthetic expressions 1 - Ad-hoc adjective compounds.
8.4. Lexical level: Immediate synesthetic expressions 2 - Ad-hoc noun phrases -- 8.5. Morpho-syntactic level: Patterns of lexical recurrence -- 8.6. Textual level: Semantic clustering -- 9. Summary and conclusions -- References -- Understanding synesthetic expressions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The PP model and its structure -- 3. Comprehension based on sensory co-occurrence -- 4. Sensory experiences and synesthesia -- 5. Comprehension based on emotional experiences -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Olfactory and visual processing and verbalization -- Conclusion -- References -- Contributors -- Index -- The series Converging Evidence in Language and Communication Research.
Summary: The paper discusses the neurological basis for olfactory and visual preferences governing human behavior, with the right cerebral hemisphere (RH) playing the dominant role, both in individuals and in types of culture in which olfaction is an important part of the semiosphere. Subjects with RH reactions showed a reliable cross-correlation of biopotentials in the RH when stimulated by odors preferable for them. Classification and verbalization of colors also demonstrates significant differences in the types of strategies used by RH vs. LH subjects. Most professional testers of odors appear to be RH personalities. The important role of cultural, as well as of linguistic, backgrounds is stressed. Right hemispheric sensory processing correlates with adaptation and resistance to stress and somatopsychic diseases.
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Speaking of Colors and Odors -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Speaking of colors and odors -- 1. Introduction to the topic -- 2. The contributions in the context of previous research -- 3. On the contributions to this volume -- 4. Acknowledgements -- References -- Color, smell, and language -- 1. Is the propositional nature of language an Aristotelian myth? -- 2. Is there a language of memory? -- What does this entail for semantics? -- 3. Is there an architecture of sensibility and sense? -- 4. Sensation vs. communication: A field of conflict -- 4.1. Perception and communication in olfaction -- 4.2. Perception and communication of colors -- 4.3. Some consequences -- 5. Is the evolution of symbolic communication based on human sensibility? -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- How can language cope with color? -- 1. Language and color: Is there a problem? -- 2. Language and color: There is a problem! -- 3. A short description of some principles of color vision -- 4. A short description of some principles of brain function -- 5. Methods to study the function of the brain -- 6. Single cells, neuronal assemblies, and behavior -- 7. Single cells versus cell assemblies -- 8. Processing of color information in the nervous system -- 9. Peculiarities of human color perception and naming -- 10. Discrepancies between the physical world and its subjective experience, or perception -- 11. Perception as synthesis of an internal representation, and its relation to language -- 12. Conclusions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Color perception, color description and metaphor -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Colors without a name - color names without color information -- 1.2. Strategies of naming colors and describing color impressions -- 2. Patterns of denoting colors.

2.1. Denotation of a hue in analogy to the typical color of a well-known object -- 2.2. Color naming with regard to dyes and pigments -- 2.3. Relational ordering of colors in the color circle and color sphere -- 2.4. Hybrid forms: Color description with regard to the relational order of colors and to typical colors of objects -- 3. Descriptions of interacting colors -- 3.1. Opposition: warm - cold -- 3.2. Opposition: active - passive -- 3.3. Opposition: soft - strong / pale - intense -- 3.4. Opposition: heavy - light -- 3.5. Opposition: deep - flat -- 3.6. The metaphor of the `rhythm of colors' -- 4. Conclusions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Attractiveness and adornment -- 1. Introduction: Functional cycles and naming -- 2. From composite signals to distanced communication -- 3. Reference to smell in Eipo, Yale, and some other Papuan languages -- 4. Reference to color in Eipo, Yale, and some other Papuan languages -- 5. Conclusion: Signs of danger, signs of beauty -- References -- Color terms between elegance and beauty -- 1. Axiomatic preliminaries -- 2. Color naming with textiles -- 3. Classification of color names for textiles -- 4. Classification of color names for cosmetics -- 5. Language use and color names for textiles -- 5.1. Oral use or customer behavior -- 5.2. Written use -- 6. Consumer behavior and function of color names -- 7. Underlying philosophy and strategy -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Color names and dynamic imagery -- 1. Introductory remarks -- 2. Color classification schemes -- 3. Color names and dynamic imagery -- 4. Complex color terms in advertising - examples from the automobile industry -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- From blue stockings to blue movies -- 1. Introductory remarks -- 2. Research on color terms -- 3. Metonymy as seen within Cognitive Linguistics.

3.1. Color metonymy: Blue - different aspects of meaning -- 3.2. Metonymy vs. metaphor -- 3.3. Radial network of blue metonymies in English -- 4. Connection to newer approaches in foreign language teaching methodology -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Odor memory* -- References -- From psychophysics to semiophysics: Categories as acts of meaning -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Some historical landmarks -- 2.1. From Psychophysics ... -- 2.2. … to Cognitive sciences: Basic color terms -- 2.3. Cognitive categories and naming -- 3. Odors -- 3.1. Odors and psychophysics -- 3.2. Cognitive approach and categories of smells -- 4. Linguistic devices for odors -- 4.1. The veridical label revisited -- 4.2. A brief summary of the data from Dubois and Rouby (2002) -- 4.3. Linguistic resources for the description of odors -- 5. Noises and sounds -- 6. Back to colors -- 7. Concluding remarks -- References -- Cognition, olfaction and linguistic creativity* -- 1. Sketch of the problem -- 2. Hedonistic judgments as basic cognitive categories in olfaction -- 3. Common linguistic constructions to describe smells -- 3.1. Iconic reference -- 3.2. Indexical reference -- 3.3. Special cases: Metaphorical reference -- 4. Why language cannot properly cope with olfaction -- 5. Does it make scents? - The poetic function of language in cologne advertising -- 5.1. Theoretical and methodological terminology - six functions of language -- 5.2. The referential function -- 5.3. The conative function -- 5.4. The poetic function and the projection principle -- 6. Hypothesis -- 7. Synesthesia: Neuropsychological capacity vs. poetic device -- 7.1. Some remarks on the modalities of sensory perception -- 8. Empirical evidence -- 8.1. The corpus -- 8.2. Synesthetic constructions in cologne advertisements -- 8.3. Lexical level: Immediate synesthetic expressions 1 - Ad-hoc adjective compounds.

8.4. Lexical level: Immediate synesthetic expressions 2 - Ad-hoc noun phrases -- 8.5. Morpho-syntactic level: Patterns of lexical recurrence -- 8.6. Textual level: Semantic clustering -- 9. Summary and conclusions -- References -- Understanding synesthetic expressions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The PP model and its structure -- 3. Comprehension based on sensory co-occurrence -- 4. Sensory experiences and synesthesia -- 5. Comprehension based on emotional experiences -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Olfactory and visual processing and verbalization -- Conclusion -- References -- Contributors -- Index -- The series Converging Evidence in Language and Communication Research.

The paper discusses the neurological basis for olfactory and visual preferences governing human behavior, with the right cerebral hemisphere (RH) playing the dominant role, both in individuals and in types of culture in which olfaction is an important part of the semiosphere. Subjects with RH reactions showed a reliable cross-correlation of biopotentials in the RH when stimulated by odors preferable for them. Classification and verbalization of colors also demonstrates significant differences in the types of strategies used by RH vs. LH subjects. Most professional testers of odors appear to be RH personalities. The important role of cultural, as well as of linguistic, backgrounds is stressed. Right hemispheric sensory processing correlates with adaptation and resistance to stress and somatopsychic diseases.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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