Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory 2003 : Selected papers from 'Going Romance' 2003, Nijmegen, 20-22 November.

By: Geerts, TwanContributor(s): Ginneken, Ivo van | Jacobs, HaikePublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2005Copyright date: ©2005Description: 1 online resource (379 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027294067Subject(s): Romance languages -- Congresses.;Romance languagesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory 2003 : Selected papers from ‘Going Romance’ 2003, Nijmegen, 20–22 NovemberDDC classification: 440 LOC classification: PC11 -- .R6 2005ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTIC THEORY 2003 -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- INTRODUCTION -- CONTENTS -- AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO VARIATION IN OT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. r-deletion in Brazilian Portuguese - An OT Account -- 3. Across-Word Regressive Assimilation in Picard - An OT Account -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- ON FACTS IN THE SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS OF ITALIAN* -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Events, propositions and facts -- 3. Facts and truth -- 3.1 Some preliminary observations on the factive truth-predicate -- 3.2 Deriving the disquotational usage -- 4. Facts and pronominal anaphora -- References -- ON THE STATUS OF STEMS IN MORPHOLOGICAL THEORY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Verbal Inflection of Latin -- 3. Stems -- 4. Stems in Latin? -- 4.1 The Perfect -- 4.2 "Past"/"Passive" and "Future Active" Participles -- 4.3 Stems and "Morphology by Itself" -- 5. Conclusions and Further Directions -- References -- ITALIAN [VN] COMPOUND NOUNS -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Theoretical Premises for a Syntactic Analysis -- 2.1 Nominal Compound Types in Italian and the [NØ] Hypothesis -- 2.2 How NØ Enters into the Structure -- 3. The Analysis of VN Compounds -- 3.1 Semantics -- 3.2 Syntax -- 3.3 Morphology -- 4. Previous Analyses on the End Vocalic Segments [a-i-i] -- 4.1 Arguments Against the Imperative Solution -- 4.2 Arguments Against the Present Tense Hypothesis -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- THE DEVELOPMENT OF LIQUIDS FROM LATIN TO CAMPIDANIAN SARDINIAN -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Latin liquids in Campidanian clusters -- 3. Sardinian: a one-liquid system -- 3.1 Phonological patterns -- 3.2 /L/ in the obstruent subset -- 3.3 Summary -- 4. Coda /R/ in Campidanian -- 4.1 Data -- 4.2 Coda requirements -- 4.3 Segment representations -- 4.4 Computing repair strategies -- 5. Conclusions -- References.
CLITIC PLACEMENT AND THE POSITION OF SUBJECTS IN THE HISTORY OF EUROPEAN PORTUGUESE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The variation between enclisis and proclisis in Classical Portuguese -- 3. The evolution of clitic placement in V3 constructions from Classical to Modern European Portuguese -- 3.1 Enclisis and Proclisis in V3: 16th and 17th centuries -- 3.2 Enclisis and Proclisis in V3 after 1700 -- 4. The dissociation of SVcl and XVcl and the loss of VS -- 5. Concluding Remarks -- References -- SUBJECT INVERSION IN SPANISH RELATIVE CLAUSES -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Wh-interrogatives -- 1.2 Focalization -- 2. Prominence, prosodic weight and word order -- 2.1 Prosodic structure -- 2.2 Prosodic weight and intonational prominence -- 3. An OT analysis -- 4. Extensions of the Analysis -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- ATTRITION AND INTERPRETABLE FEATURES -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Interpretability of features and syntactic attrition -- 2.1 Subjects -- 2.2 White & Genesee's Criteria -- 3. Syntactic subjects -- 4. The interpretable feature of number -- 4.1 Number -- 5. Results and discussion -- References -- ACCELERATION IN BILINGUAL FIRST LANGUAGE ACQUISITION -- 1. Language influence and language separation in bilingual acquisition -- 2. Nominal arguments and the NP/ DP distinction -- 2.1. Why language influence in the nominal domain is expected -- 3. The acquisition of determiners -- 3.1 The "Romance"- "Germanic" asymmetry in acquisition -- 3.2 The data -- 3.3 Acceleration in the acquisition of determiners in the German of the bilingual children -- 4. Article functions in the early grammar of a bilingual German-French child -- 5. Conclusion and discussion -- References -- "FOCUS VS" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Focus VS in French -- 2.1 Examples -- 2.2 The interpretation of the postverbal subject -- 2.3 Syntactic properties -- 3. Two analyses for VS in the literature.
4. The analysis of focus VS -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The type of verb movement involved in the derivation of focus VS -- 4.3 The position of the subject in focus VS -- 4.4 The position of the verb phrase (TP) in focus VS -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- ASPECTUAL QUANTIZATION AND [±] ACCUSATIVE CASE CHECKING IN ROMANCE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Displacement and case checking -- 2.1 The Minimalist Program -- 2.2 "Weak" and "strong" case -- 2.3 Absolute small clauses (ASCs) -- 2.4 Subject in-situ Generalization (Alexiadou & Anagnostopoulou 2001:216) -- 3. The conflation of sentential and lexical aspect and the theory of case -- 4. The analysis -- 4.1 The trigger for V-movement and case activation -- 4.2 AGREE as a default case -- 4.3 Differential object marking -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- STRATA, YES -- STRUCTURE PRESERVATION, NO. -- 1. Two issues in phonological theory -- 1.1 Stratification -- 1.2 Structure Preservation -- 2. Basic Spanish syllabification -- 2.1 Minimal onset -- 2.2 Onset maximization -- 2.3 Cyclic effects -- 2.4 Cancellation of cyclic effects -- 3. Evidence compatible with a single evaluation -- 4. /s/ aspiration evidence for multiple evaluation -- 5. Onset /i/ evidence for multiple evaluation -- 5.1 Word-bounded consonantalization -- 5.2 Cyclic effects -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- DURATIONAL ASYMMETRIES AND THE THEORY OF QUANTITY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Durational (a)symmetries in 'VC sequences: Latin and Romance -- 2.1 "Duration rhythm" in Italian 'VC sequences -- 2.2 Quantity in Latin, Italian and Spanish -- 3. Comparative consequences of the 'VC domain beyond Romance -- 3.1 Quantity distribution in Germanic languages -- 3.2 'VC domain durational (a)symmetry in Icelandic -- 3.3 Constraints and enhancement in Italian and Icelandic -- 3.4 Marsican is like Icelandic.
4. The VC hypothesis: (a)symmetries, rhythm, and the computation of duration -- 4.1 Concrete evidence for the VC hypothesis -- 4.2 Phonological viability and projections of the VC hypothesis -- 4.3 The calculus of temporal distribution in Italian at phonetic interface -- 4.4 Modeling (a)symmetries -- References -- WHAT LENITION AND FORTITION TELL US ABOUT GALLO-ROMANCE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. CVCV and the Coda Mirror -- 2.1 Adjacency vs. positional effects: the fate of Latin obstruents in French -- 2.2 Strong positions enjoy a uniform identity: the Coda Mirror -- 3. The Gallo-Romance trouble with TR clusters: colubra -- 3.1 TR was already ambiguous in Latin -- 3.2 Self-contradictory evidence from the (Gallo-)Romance evolution of Latin TR clusters -- 3.3 Solutions offered in the literature -- 4. C+j sequences in Gallo-Romance -- 5. TR is an affricate: Gallo-Romance epenthesis cam(e)ra > chambre -- 5.1 Gallo-Romance epenthesis: well-known facts -- 5.2 Syllabic units do not fall from heaven -- 5.3 Gallo-Romance "epenthesis": strengthening, not a "bad contact" -- 5.4 Parasitic r and metathesis -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- THE LAZY FRENCHMAN'S APPROACH TO THE SUBJUNCTIVE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Referential Approach -- 2.1 Reference to Individuals -- 2.2 Reference to Worlds -- 3. The French Subjunctive as a Semantic Default -- 3.1 Subjunctive vs. Imperative -- 3.2 Subjunctive vs. Infinitive -- 3.3 Subjunctive vs. Modally Interpreted Past Tense -- 4. The Indicative -- 4.1 Basic Analysis -- 4.2 Minimal Pairs -- 4.3 Hope vs. Want -- 4.4 Counterfactual reasoning and emotives -- 5. Extension: The German Konjunktiv I as a Reportive Indicative -- References -- VOWEL CENTRALIZATION IN ROMANIAN VERBS OF SLAVIC ORIGIN -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The regular sound change -- 3. Spread of the urî-pattern -- 4. Explanatory attempts -- 4.1 Analogical extension.
4.2 Metaphony/vowel harmony -- 4.3 Borrowing of the vowel with the verb -- 4.4 Borrowing of trilled or "fortis" /r/ -- 5. Exploitation of existing structures to mark loanwords -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- APPENDIX: Etymologies of 112 verbs in -ri -- ON THE RUMANIAN kt > pt SHIFT -- 1. How to describe the phenomenon? -- 1.1 About the substratum -- 1.2 Two possible descriptions -- 1.3 Two possible analyses: melodic influence or weakening. -- 2. Coda weakness in world languages -- 2.1 Coda weakness in the KT>PT shift -- 2.2 Coda weakening in Romance languages and in Rumanian -- 3. Melodic hypothesis -- 3.1 Underspecification and unlikely coronal influence -- 3.2 Nandris (1963, 1971): K > P before anterior consonant -- 3.3 On final "coda": vocalic arguments in favor of final onset -- 4. From weakness to weakening -- 4.1 Underspecification and unlikely coronal influence -- 4.2 Philological contribution -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- EVIDENCE FOR A CUE-BASED THEORY OF LANGUAGE CHANGE AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The null object in Brazilian Portuguese -- 3. Factoring the data -- 3.1 Diachronic facts -- 3.2 The acquisition of the null object -- 4. Null as ellipsis -- 5. Final Remarks -- References -- SUBJECT INDEX -- AUTHOR INDEX -- The series Current Issues in Linguistic Theory.
Summary: The annual Going Romance conference is the major European discussion forum for theoretically relevant research on Romance languages where current ideas about language in general and about Romance languages in particular are tested. Starting with the thirteenth conference held in 1999, volumes with selected papers of the conferences are published under the title Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory, This is the fifth such volume, containing a selection of papers that have been presented at the seventeenth Going Romance conference, held at the Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands) from 20-22 November 2003. The three-day program included a workshop on 'Diachronic Phonology'. The present volume contains a broad range of articles dealing not only with syntax and phonology, but also with morphology, semantics and acquisition of the Romance languages.
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ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTIC THEORY 2003 -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- INTRODUCTION -- CONTENTS -- AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO VARIATION IN OT -- 1. Introduction -- 2. r-deletion in Brazilian Portuguese - An OT Account -- 3. Across-Word Regressive Assimilation in Picard - An OT Account -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- ON FACTS IN THE SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS OF ITALIAN* -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Events, propositions and facts -- 3. Facts and truth -- 3.1 Some preliminary observations on the factive truth-predicate -- 3.2 Deriving the disquotational usage -- 4. Facts and pronominal anaphora -- References -- ON THE STATUS OF STEMS IN MORPHOLOGICAL THEORY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Verbal Inflection of Latin -- 3. Stems -- 4. Stems in Latin? -- 4.1 The Perfect -- 4.2 "Past"/"Passive" and "Future Active" Participles -- 4.3 Stems and "Morphology by Itself" -- 5. Conclusions and Further Directions -- References -- ITALIAN [VN] COMPOUND NOUNS -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Theoretical Premises for a Syntactic Analysis -- 2.1 Nominal Compound Types in Italian and the [NØ] Hypothesis -- 2.2 How NØ Enters into the Structure -- 3. The Analysis of VN Compounds -- 3.1 Semantics -- 3.2 Syntax -- 3.3 Morphology -- 4. Previous Analyses on the End Vocalic Segments [a-i-i] -- 4.1 Arguments Against the Imperative Solution -- 4.2 Arguments Against the Present Tense Hypothesis -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- THE DEVELOPMENT OF LIQUIDS FROM LATIN TO CAMPIDANIAN SARDINIAN -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Latin liquids in Campidanian clusters -- 3. Sardinian: a one-liquid system -- 3.1 Phonological patterns -- 3.2 /L/ in the obstruent subset -- 3.3 Summary -- 4. Coda /R/ in Campidanian -- 4.1 Data -- 4.2 Coda requirements -- 4.3 Segment representations -- 4.4 Computing repair strategies -- 5. Conclusions -- References.

CLITIC PLACEMENT AND THE POSITION OF SUBJECTS IN THE HISTORY OF EUROPEAN PORTUGUESE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The variation between enclisis and proclisis in Classical Portuguese -- 3. The evolution of clitic placement in V3 constructions from Classical to Modern European Portuguese -- 3.1 Enclisis and Proclisis in V3: 16th and 17th centuries -- 3.2 Enclisis and Proclisis in V3 after 1700 -- 4. The dissociation of SVcl and XVcl and the loss of VS -- 5. Concluding Remarks -- References -- SUBJECT INVERSION IN SPANISH RELATIVE CLAUSES -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Wh-interrogatives -- 1.2 Focalization -- 2. Prominence, prosodic weight and word order -- 2.1 Prosodic structure -- 2.2 Prosodic weight and intonational prominence -- 3. An OT analysis -- 4. Extensions of the Analysis -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- ATTRITION AND INTERPRETABLE FEATURES -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Interpretability of features and syntactic attrition -- 2.1 Subjects -- 2.2 White & Genesee's Criteria -- 3. Syntactic subjects -- 4. The interpretable feature of number -- 4.1 Number -- 5. Results and discussion -- References -- ACCELERATION IN BILINGUAL FIRST LANGUAGE ACQUISITION -- 1. Language influence and language separation in bilingual acquisition -- 2. Nominal arguments and the NP/ DP distinction -- 2.1. Why language influence in the nominal domain is expected -- 3. The acquisition of determiners -- 3.1 The "Romance"- "Germanic" asymmetry in acquisition -- 3.2 The data -- 3.3 Acceleration in the acquisition of determiners in the German of the bilingual children -- 4. Article functions in the early grammar of a bilingual German-French child -- 5. Conclusion and discussion -- References -- "FOCUS VS" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Focus VS in French -- 2.1 Examples -- 2.2 The interpretation of the postverbal subject -- 2.3 Syntactic properties -- 3. Two analyses for VS in the literature.

4. The analysis of focus VS -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The type of verb movement involved in the derivation of focus VS -- 4.3 The position of the subject in focus VS -- 4.4 The position of the verb phrase (TP) in focus VS -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- ASPECTUAL QUANTIZATION AND [±] ACCUSATIVE CASE CHECKING IN ROMANCE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Displacement and case checking -- 2.1 The Minimalist Program -- 2.2 "Weak" and "strong" case -- 2.3 Absolute small clauses (ASCs) -- 2.4 Subject in-situ Generalization (Alexiadou & Anagnostopoulou 2001:216) -- 3. The conflation of sentential and lexical aspect and the theory of case -- 4. The analysis -- 4.1 The trigger for V-movement and case activation -- 4.2 AGREE as a default case -- 4.3 Differential object marking -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- STRATA, YES -- STRUCTURE PRESERVATION, NO. -- 1. Two issues in phonological theory -- 1.1 Stratification -- 1.2 Structure Preservation -- 2. Basic Spanish syllabification -- 2.1 Minimal onset -- 2.2 Onset maximization -- 2.3 Cyclic effects -- 2.4 Cancellation of cyclic effects -- 3. Evidence compatible with a single evaluation -- 4. /s/ aspiration evidence for multiple evaluation -- 5. Onset /i/ evidence for multiple evaluation -- 5.1 Word-bounded consonantalization -- 5.2 Cyclic effects -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- DURATIONAL ASYMMETRIES AND THE THEORY OF QUANTITY -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Durational (a)symmetries in 'VC sequences: Latin and Romance -- 2.1 "Duration rhythm" in Italian 'VC sequences -- 2.2 Quantity in Latin, Italian and Spanish -- 3. Comparative consequences of the 'VC domain beyond Romance -- 3.1 Quantity distribution in Germanic languages -- 3.2 'VC domain durational (a)symmetry in Icelandic -- 3.3 Constraints and enhancement in Italian and Icelandic -- 3.4 Marsican is like Icelandic.

4. The VC hypothesis: (a)symmetries, rhythm, and the computation of duration -- 4.1 Concrete evidence for the VC hypothesis -- 4.2 Phonological viability and projections of the VC hypothesis -- 4.3 The calculus of temporal distribution in Italian at phonetic interface -- 4.4 Modeling (a)symmetries -- References -- WHAT LENITION AND FORTITION TELL US ABOUT GALLO-ROMANCE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. CVCV and the Coda Mirror -- 2.1 Adjacency vs. positional effects: the fate of Latin obstruents in French -- 2.2 Strong positions enjoy a uniform identity: the Coda Mirror -- 3. The Gallo-Romance trouble with TR clusters: colubra -- 3.1 TR was already ambiguous in Latin -- 3.2 Self-contradictory evidence from the (Gallo-)Romance evolution of Latin TR clusters -- 3.3 Solutions offered in the literature -- 4. C+j sequences in Gallo-Romance -- 5. TR is an affricate: Gallo-Romance epenthesis cam(e)ra > chambre -- 5.1 Gallo-Romance epenthesis: well-known facts -- 5.2 Syllabic units do not fall from heaven -- 5.3 Gallo-Romance "epenthesis": strengthening, not a "bad contact" -- 5.4 Parasitic r and metathesis -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- THE LAZY FRENCHMAN'S APPROACH TO THE SUBJUNCTIVE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Referential Approach -- 2.1 Reference to Individuals -- 2.2 Reference to Worlds -- 3. The French Subjunctive as a Semantic Default -- 3.1 Subjunctive vs. Imperative -- 3.2 Subjunctive vs. Infinitive -- 3.3 Subjunctive vs. Modally Interpreted Past Tense -- 4. The Indicative -- 4.1 Basic Analysis -- 4.2 Minimal Pairs -- 4.3 Hope vs. Want -- 4.4 Counterfactual reasoning and emotives -- 5. Extension: The German Konjunktiv I as a Reportive Indicative -- References -- VOWEL CENTRALIZATION IN ROMANIAN VERBS OF SLAVIC ORIGIN -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The regular sound change -- 3. Spread of the urî-pattern -- 4. Explanatory attempts -- 4.1 Analogical extension.

4.2 Metaphony/vowel harmony -- 4.3 Borrowing of the vowel with the verb -- 4.4 Borrowing of trilled or "fortis" /r/ -- 5. Exploitation of existing structures to mark loanwords -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- APPENDIX: Etymologies of 112 verbs in -ri -- ON THE RUMANIAN kt > pt SHIFT -- 1. How to describe the phenomenon? -- 1.1 About the substratum -- 1.2 Two possible descriptions -- 1.3 Two possible analyses: melodic influence or weakening. -- 2. Coda weakness in world languages -- 2.1 Coda weakness in the KT>PT shift -- 2.2 Coda weakening in Romance languages and in Rumanian -- 3. Melodic hypothesis -- 3.1 Underspecification and unlikely coronal influence -- 3.2 Nandris (1963, 1971): K > P before anterior consonant -- 3.3 On final "coda": vocalic arguments in favor of final onset -- 4. From weakness to weakening -- 4.1 Underspecification and unlikely coronal influence -- 4.2 Philological contribution -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- EVIDENCE FOR A CUE-BASED THEORY OF LANGUAGE CHANGE AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The null object in Brazilian Portuguese -- 3. Factoring the data -- 3.1 Diachronic facts -- 3.2 The acquisition of the null object -- 4. Null as ellipsis -- 5. Final Remarks -- References -- SUBJECT INDEX -- AUTHOR INDEX -- The series Current Issues in Linguistic Theory.

The annual Going Romance conference is the major European discussion forum for theoretically relevant research on Romance languages where current ideas about language in general and about Romance languages in particular are tested. Starting with the thirteenth conference held in 1999, volumes with selected papers of the conferences are published under the title Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory, This is the fifth such volume, containing a selection of papers that have been presented at the seventeenth Going Romance conference, held at the Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands) from 20-22 November 2003. The three-day program included a workshop on 'Diachronic Phonology'. The present volume contains a broad range of articles dealing not only with syntax and phonology, but also with morphology, semantics and acquisition of the Romance languages.

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