Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory : Selected papers from 'Going Romance' Amsterdam 2007.

By: Aboh, Enoch OContributor(s): Linden, Elisabeth van der | Quer, Josep | Sleeman, PetraSeries: Romance Languages and Linguistic TheoryPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (300 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027288707Subject(s): Romance languages -- Congresses.;Linguistics -- CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory : Selected papers from ‘Going Romance’ Amsterdam 2007DDC classification: 440 LOC classification: PC11 -- .R637 2007ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Foreword -- Tense domains in BP and EP - vP, CP and phases -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Aux-to-Comp -- 3. C-Deletion -- 4. Gerundive licensing -- 5. Tense as the locus of variation between BP and EP -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- Variable-behavior Ps and the location of PATH in Old French -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Variable-behavior Ps -- 2.1 Particles in Romance -- 2.2 The prepositional use of particles -- 2.3 Summary -- 3. Arguments against the lexical analysis -- 3.1 Semantic variability -- 3.2 Syntactic variability -- 3.3 Summary -- 4. A structural account of variable behavior Ps in Old French -- 4.1 Class 1 P-elements -- 4.1.1 The locative interpretation of Class 1 P-elements -- 4.1.2 The directional interpretation of Class 1 P-elements -- 4.1.3 The aspectual interpretation of Class 1 P-elements -- 4.2 Class 2 P-elements -- 4.3 The locative interpretation of particles -- 4.4 Summary -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Hebrew and Arabic children going Romance -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word order in the four languages under consideration -- 3. The acquisition of subject-verb order: Results -- 3.1 Palestinian Arabic -- 3.2 Spanish -- 3.3 European Portuguese -- 3.4 Hebrew -- 3.5 Summary -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Adjectives and deleted nominals in Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Focus in nominal ellipsis -- 3. Adjectival modification and nominal ellipsis in Spanish -- 4. Structural approaches: A critical review -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- On the nature of covert operations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Focus 'extension' -- 2.1 Island effects -- 2.2 Fixed and periphrastic expressions, idiom chunks -- 3. Arguments supporting the covert focus extension hypothesis -- 3.1. Subjects and VP adverbs.
3.2 Focus 'restriction' -- 3.3 Double objects -- 4. Other cases -- 4.1 Either, neither -- 4.2 NPI's, (not) even -- 4.3 Focus markers -- 5. Wh movement: Split interrogatives -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Ellipsis and Restructuring in European Portuguese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. NCA as a Deep or Surface anaphora and the distribution of Restructuring -- 3. The selectional properties of NCA licensing verbs -- 3.1. The lexical content of NCA licensors -- 3.2 The categorial nature of the gap in NCA constructions -- 4. NCA and Restructuring -- 4.1 Restructuring in EP -- 4.2 The complementary distribution of NCA and Restructuring -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- The early steps of modal and negation Interactions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous studies on children's interpretation of modals and negation -- 3. An experimental study on children's interpretation of sentences containing puo' and non in Italian -- 3.1 Materials -- 3.2 Participants -- 3.3 Results -- 4. Concluding remarks -- Appendix - Target sentences -- References -- Structural patterns blocking plural in Romance Nominalizations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Plural marking in Romanian CENs -- 2.1 Telicity and plural marking -- 3. The aspect projection in the Romanian supine -- 3.1 The pluractional operator (PO) -- 3.2 The interaction between the supine and the verbal base -- 4. Inner aspect in CENs: Spanish Nominal Infinitives (SNIs) -- 4.1 Nominal properties in SNIs -- 4.2 Inner vs. outer aspect -- 4.3 The analysis -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- On the distribution of adjectives in Romanian -- 1. Introduction: Adjectival modification and cel -- 2. Descriptive facts about cel in Romanian -- 2.1. Historical development -- 2.2 The distribution of "cel" in Romanian -- 3. Similarities between the cel construction and Greek DS -- 4. Differences between DS and the cel construction.
5. The analysis of the cel construction -- 6. Summary and conclusions -- Appendix: cel and celui -- References -- Subject doubling in European Portuguese dialects -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word order as evidence for different types of subject doubling -- 3. Agreement in the double subject impersonal se construction -- 4. Interpretative effects in the double subject impersonal se construction -- 4.1 Inclusive reading (the doubling pronoun/DP is 1st person plural) -- 4.2 Exclusive reading (the doubling pronoun/DP is 3rd person plural) -- 5. Accounting for the availability of subject doubling in EP dialects -- 6. Further evidence supporting the analysis -- 6.1 The pronoun se is plural in dialectal EP: Adjectival agreement -- 6.2 The pronoun se is person-less in dialectal EP: Anaphoric binding -- 6.3 Pure expletive se with impersonal predicates -- 7. Consequences of the proposed analysis -- References -- On the Quebec French interrogative particle tu -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Tu: Interrogative particle or pronominal clitic? -- 2.1 A brief history of tu -- 2.2 Distribution -- 3. Clitic doubling in QF -- 3.1 Distribution -- 3.2 Previous analyses -- 3.2.1 Rizzi (1986) -- 3.2.2 Roberge (1990) -- 3.2.3 Sportiche (1998) -- 3.2.4 De Cat (2005) -- 4. Analysis -- 4.1 The definiteness effect -- 4.2 Incompatibility of tu with wh-elements -- 4.3 Restriction to main clauses -- 4.4 Incompatibility of tu with negation -- 5. Other dialects -- 5.1 Pied Noir French -- 5.2 Paduan -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Autonomous typological prosodic evolution versus the Germanic superstrate in diachronic French phonology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Arguments against a Frankish influence on the stress system -- 2.1 Entire stress systems are not borrowed from one language to another -- 2.2 The place of Frankish stress in the 5th century.
2.3 The supposed heavy expiratory stress in Frankish -- 3. Melodic' versus 'expiratory' accent -- 3.1. The role of stress distinction in historical linguistics -- 3.2 The distinction confronted with modern experimental phonetics -- 4. Other changes in French and Frankish -- 4.1 Other aspects of the evolution of French -- 4.1.1 A pendular movement in syllable structure -- 4.1.2 Diphthongization -- 4.1.3 Degemination -- 4.1.4 The genesis of final devoicing -- 4.1.5 Loss of productivity of vowel reduction -- 4.1.6 Loss of productivity of final consonant devoicing -- 4.1.7 A change in the conditioning of final vowel deletion -- 4.2 Some aspects of the evolution of continental West Germanic -- 5. Syllable counting languages and stress counting languages -- 5.1 Syllable vs. word languages -- 5.1.1 Syllable timed languages versus stress timed languages -- 5.1.2 The perceptive theory by Dauer -- 5.1.3 The prosodic phonology of Nespor & Vogel -- 5.1.4 The theory by Auer and Uhmann -- 5.2 Modern French as a syllable language and Old French as a word language -- 5.3 Modern Dutch and German as word languages and Old High German and Old Dutch as syllable languages -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Dummy prepositions and the licensing of null subjects in Brazilian Portuguese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Referential null subjects in BP as traces of movement -- 3. Finite control into noun complement clauses -- 4. Dummy prepositions and object vs. adjunct control -- 5. Dummy prepositions and the A-over-A Condition -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- OV sequences in early child Catalan and English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The data -- 3. Previous accounts of OV sequences in English and Catalan -- 4. Theoretical background -- 4.1 Solà (1996) -- 4.2 On Focus and left-dislocation in Catalan -- 5. Analysis -- 5.1 Catalan: Evidence for Focus-movement.
5.2 English: 'True' OV sequences -- 6. Summary and conclusions -- References -- Index.
Summary: The volumes Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory: Selected papers from 'Going Romance' contain the selected papers of the Going Romance conferences, a major European annual discussion forum for theoretically relevant research on Romance languages.This volume assembles a significant number of selected papers that were presented at the 21st edition of Going Romance, which was organized by the Chair of Romance Linguistics of the University of Amsterdam in December 2007. The range of languages (both standard and non-standard varieties) analyzed in this volume is quite significant: Catalan, French, Italian, European and Brazilian Portuguese, Romanian and Spanish. The volume is quite representative of the spread of the variety of research carried out nowadays on Romance languages within theoretical linguistics and shows the vitality of this research.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan
Available EBKAF00045768
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal
Available EBKNP00045768
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan

Access a wide range of magazines and books using Pressreader and Ebook central.

Enjoy your reading, British Council Sudan.

Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia
Available
Total holds: 0

Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Foreword -- Tense domains in BP and EP - vP, CP and phases -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Aux-to-Comp -- 3. C-Deletion -- 4. Gerundive licensing -- 5. Tense as the locus of variation between BP and EP -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- Variable-behavior Ps and the location of PATH in Old French -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Variable-behavior Ps -- 2.1 Particles in Romance -- 2.2 The prepositional use of particles -- 2.3 Summary -- 3. Arguments against the lexical analysis -- 3.1 Semantic variability -- 3.2 Syntactic variability -- 3.3 Summary -- 4. A structural account of variable behavior Ps in Old French -- 4.1 Class 1 P-elements -- 4.1.1 The locative interpretation of Class 1 P-elements -- 4.1.2 The directional interpretation of Class 1 P-elements -- 4.1.3 The aspectual interpretation of Class 1 P-elements -- 4.2 Class 2 P-elements -- 4.3 The locative interpretation of particles -- 4.4 Summary -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Hebrew and Arabic children going Romance -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word order in the four languages under consideration -- 3. The acquisition of subject-verb order: Results -- 3.1 Palestinian Arabic -- 3.2 Spanish -- 3.3 European Portuguese -- 3.4 Hebrew -- 3.5 Summary -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Adjectives and deleted nominals in Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Focus in nominal ellipsis -- 3. Adjectival modification and nominal ellipsis in Spanish -- 4. Structural approaches: A critical review -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- On the nature of covert operations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Focus 'extension' -- 2.1 Island effects -- 2.2 Fixed and periphrastic expressions, idiom chunks -- 3. Arguments supporting the covert focus extension hypothesis -- 3.1. Subjects and VP adverbs.

3.2 Focus 'restriction' -- 3.3 Double objects -- 4. Other cases -- 4.1 Either, neither -- 4.2 NPI's, (not) even -- 4.3 Focus markers -- 5. Wh movement: Split interrogatives -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Ellipsis and Restructuring in European Portuguese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. NCA as a Deep or Surface anaphora and the distribution of Restructuring -- 3. The selectional properties of NCA licensing verbs -- 3.1. The lexical content of NCA licensors -- 3.2 The categorial nature of the gap in NCA constructions -- 4. NCA and Restructuring -- 4.1 Restructuring in EP -- 4.2 The complementary distribution of NCA and Restructuring -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- The early steps of modal and negation Interactions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous studies on children's interpretation of modals and negation -- 3. An experimental study on children's interpretation of sentences containing puo' and non in Italian -- 3.1 Materials -- 3.2 Participants -- 3.3 Results -- 4. Concluding remarks -- Appendix - Target sentences -- References -- Structural patterns blocking plural in Romance Nominalizations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Plural marking in Romanian CENs -- 2.1 Telicity and plural marking -- 3. The aspect projection in the Romanian supine -- 3.1 The pluractional operator (PO) -- 3.2 The interaction between the supine and the verbal base -- 4. Inner aspect in CENs: Spanish Nominal Infinitives (SNIs) -- 4.1 Nominal properties in SNIs -- 4.2 Inner vs. outer aspect -- 4.3 The analysis -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- On the distribution of adjectives in Romanian -- 1. Introduction: Adjectival modification and cel -- 2. Descriptive facts about cel in Romanian -- 2.1. Historical development -- 2.2 The distribution of "cel" in Romanian -- 3. Similarities between the cel construction and Greek DS -- 4. Differences between DS and the cel construction.

5. The analysis of the cel construction -- 6. Summary and conclusions -- Appendix: cel and celui -- References -- Subject doubling in European Portuguese dialects -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word order as evidence for different types of subject doubling -- 3. Agreement in the double subject impersonal se construction -- 4. Interpretative effects in the double subject impersonal se construction -- 4.1 Inclusive reading (the doubling pronoun/DP is 1st person plural) -- 4.2 Exclusive reading (the doubling pronoun/DP is 3rd person plural) -- 5. Accounting for the availability of subject doubling in EP dialects -- 6. Further evidence supporting the analysis -- 6.1 The pronoun se is plural in dialectal EP: Adjectival agreement -- 6.2 The pronoun se is person-less in dialectal EP: Anaphoric binding -- 6.3 Pure expletive se with impersonal predicates -- 7. Consequences of the proposed analysis -- References -- On the Quebec French interrogative particle tu -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Tu: Interrogative particle or pronominal clitic? -- 2.1 A brief history of tu -- 2.2 Distribution -- 3. Clitic doubling in QF -- 3.1 Distribution -- 3.2 Previous analyses -- 3.2.1 Rizzi (1986) -- 3.2.2 Roberge (1990) -- 3.2.3 Sportiche (1998) -- 3.2.4 De Cat (2005) -- 4. Analysis -- 4.1 The definiteness effect -- 4.2 Incompatibility of tu with wh-elements -- 4.3 Restriction to main clauses -- 4.4 Incompatibility of tu with negation -- 5. Other dialects -- 5.1 Pied Noir French -- 5.2 Paduan -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Autonomous typological prosodic evolution versus the Germanic superstrate in diachronic French phonology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Arguments against a Frankish influence on the stress system -- 2.1 Entire stress systems are not borrowed from one language to another -- 2.2 The place of Frankish stress in the 5th century.

2.3 The supposed heavy expiratory stress in Frankish -- 3. Melodic' versus 'expiratory' accent -- 3.1. The role of stress distinction in historical linguistics -- 3.2 The distinction confronted with modern experimental phonetics -- 4. Other changes in French and Frankish -- 4.1 Other aspects of the evolution of French -- 4.1.1 A pendular movement in syllable structure -- 4.1.2 Diphthongization -- 4.1.3 Degemination -- 4.1.4 The genesis of final devoicing -- 4.1.5 Loss of productivity of vowel reduction -- 4.1.6 Loss of productivity of final consonant devoicing -- 4.1.7 A change in the conditioning of final vowel deletion -- 4.2 Some aspects of the evolution of continental West Germanic -- 5. Syllable counting languages and stress counting languages -- 5.1 Syllable vs. word languages -- 5.1.1 Syllable timed languages versus stress timed languages -- 5.1.2 The perceptive theory by Dauer -- 5.1.3 The prosodic phonology of Nespor & Vogel -- 5.1.4 The theory by Auer and Uhmann -- 5.2 Modern French as a syllable language and Old French as a word language -- 5.3 Modern Dutch and German as word languages and Old High German and Old Dutch as syllable languages -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Dummy prepositions and the licensing of null subjects in Brazilian Portuguese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Referential null subjects in BP as traces of movement -- 3. Finite control into noun complement clauses -- 4. Dummy prepositions and object vs. adjunct control -- 5. Dummy prepositions and the A-over-A Condition -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- OV sequences in early child Catalan and English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The data -- 3. Previous accounts of OV sequences in English and Catalan -- 4. Theoretical background -- 4.1 Solà (1996) -- 4.2 On Focus and left-dislocation in Catalan -- 5. Analysis -- 5.1 Catalan: Evidence for Focus-movement.

5.2 English: 'True' OV sequences -- 6. Summary and conclusions -- References -- Index.

The volumes Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory: Selected papers from 'Going Romance' contain the selected papers of the Going Romance conferences, a major European annual discussion forum for theoretically relevant research on Romance languages.This volume assembles a significant number of selected papers that were presented at the 21st edition of Going Romance, which was organized by the Chair of Romance Linguistics of the University of Amsterdam in December 2007. The range of languages (both standard and non-standard varieties) analyzed in this volume is quite significant: Catalan, French, Italian, European and Brazilian Portuguese, Romanian and Spanish. The volume is quite representative of the spread of the variety of research carried out nowadays on Romance languages within theoretical linguistics and shows the vitality of this research.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.