Linguistics of Eating and Drinking.

By: Newman, John
Publisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (296 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027290151Subject(s): Grammar, Comparative and general -- Verb.;Grammar, Comparative and general -- Morphosyntax.;SemanticsGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Linguistics of Eating and DrinkingDDC classification: 415 LOC classification: P281 -- .L54 2009ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
The Linguistics of Eating and Drinking -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- References -- A cross-linguistic overview of 'eat' and 'drink' -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Central Meanings -- 3. Lexicalizations -- 4. Syntax with central meanings -- 5. Extensions based on the perfectivity of 'eat' -- 6. Extensions based on internalization -- 6.1 Extensions based on the sensation of the consumer -- 6.2 Pleasant inhaling, smoking etc -- 6.3 Emotional/intellectual satisfaction -- 6.4 Chepang emotive 'eat' suffix -- 6.5 To experience unpleasantness -- 6.6 Adversative passive -- 6.7 Hausa frequentative -- 7 Extensions based on the destruction of food -- 7.1 Physical destruction -- 7.2. Psychological torment -- 8. Extensions based on sensation and destruction -- 8.1 Eat one's words -- 8.2 Sexual intercourse -- 9. Eat' and 'drink' as salient human concepts -- 10. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- How transitive are eat and drink verbs? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Crosslinguistic data -- 2.1 Intransitive alternants -- 2.2 Labile verbs -- 2.3 Causativisation -- 2.4 Case-marking patterns -- 3. The affected agent -- 4. Affected agents and the transitive prototype -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Quirky alternations of transitivity -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Ingestives in a cross-linguistic perspective -- 3. Ingestives and ambitransitivity -- 3.1 The implicit object -- 3.2 The Lexical Structure of Ingestives -- 4. Ingestives as three-place predicates -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- All people eat and drink. does this mean that 'eat' and 'drink' are universal human concepts? -- 1. Introduction: universals of the human condition vs. universals of human thinking -- A human universal [A] -- A human universal [B] -- A human universal [C].
2. Metalanguage as a central problem for cross-linguistic semantics -- 3. Eating" and "drinking" in the Papuan Kalam -- The Kalam word ñb ('eat/drink') -- 4. The English verbs 'eat' and 'drink' seen from a Kalam perspective -- Someone (X) was eating something (Y) -- Someone (X) was drinking something (Y) -- 5. Eating" and "drinking" in the Australian language Warlpiri -- The Warlpiri word yilyi-wirrpirni ( 'to slurp, like kangaroo blood') -- 6. The English concept of 'sucking' and its closest counterparts in Warlpiri -- Someone (X) was sucking something (Y)   [e.g., a bottle] -- Someone (X) was sucking something (Y) from something (Z) -- 7. Drinking" in another Australian language, Arrernte -- Someone (X) was antyweme-ing ( 'drinking/sucking') something (juice, nectar -- blood -- mother's milk) -- 8. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- eating', 'drinking' and 'smoking' -- 1. The verb of 'consumption' and its semantics in Manambu -- 1.1 Eating, drinking and smoking: general remarks -- 1.2 Metaphorical consumption' in Manambu -- 1.3 Other verbs referring to food consumption -- 1.4 Eating' as the central meaning of the verb 'consume' -- 2. The status of the verb of consumption in Manambu -- 3. Verb of consumption' in Manambu: genetic and areal perspective -- Abbreviations -- References -- Athapaskan eating and drinking verbs and constructions -- 1. A focus on themes in the Dene languages -- 2. A brief overview of Dene clause structure and the Dene verb -- 3. Specialized" classificatory consumption verb stems in some Dene languages -- 4. Co-opted" classificatory consumption verb stems in other Dene languages -- 5. Manner and extent of consumption coding -- 5.1 Non-classificatory stem sources for manner-conflating consumption verbs -- 5.2 Prefix modulations affecting eating and drinking verbs.
6. Figurative eating and drinking in Dene languages -- 6.1 Metonymies -- 6.2 Metaphors -- 7. Hunger and thirst in Athapaskan -- 8. The lexical semantics of basic verbs and coming to terms with Athapaskan prehistory -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- References -- The semantic evolution of eat-expressions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Cognitive issues -- 3. Patterns of diffusion in Hindi-Urdu -- 4. Variation in the thematic roles of the subjects of EAT-expressions -- 5. Syntactic properties of EAT-expressions in Hindi-Urdu -- 6. EAT-expressions in Marathi (Indo-Aryan, southern neighbor of Hindi) -- A. Disappearance of EAT-expressions in Marathi -- B. Patterns of diffusion in Marathi -- B1 Cohyponymy -- B2 Hypernymy -- B3 Higher-level synonymy (tsop = maar): -- 7. Signs of a prehistoric radiation of EAT -- 8. Conclusions and conjectures -- Abbreviations -- References -- Literal and figurative uses of japanese eat and drink -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Morphosyntax with the central meaning -- 3. Eat' -- 3.1 Taberu, kuu, kurau -- 3.2 Shoku-suru -- 4. Drink' -- 4.1 Nomu, tashinamu -- 4.2 Tashinamu -- 5. Honorifics -- 6. Metaphoric extensions -- 6.1 Holding food in the mouth -- 6.2 Internalizing food -- 6.3 Biting food -- 6.4 Destruction of food -- 6.5 Swallowing food/liquid -- 6.6 Receiving food -- 7. Metonymic extensions -- 8. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Internet sources -- What (not) to eat or drink -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Basic syntax and semantics of mek- 'to eat' and masi- 'to drink' -- 3. Internal structure of eating and drinking -- 4. Metaphorical extensions of the verb mek- 'eat' -- 4.1 Agent-oriented extensions -- 4.2 Patient-oriented extensions -- 4.3 Extensions based on internalization and destruction -- 4.4 Why can you eat heat when you can't eat cold? -- 5. Social significance of eating and drinking in Korean (culture) -- 6. Conclusion.
Abbreviations -- References -- Metaphorical extensions of 'eat' ⇒[overcome] and 'drink' ⇒ [undergo] in hausa -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The hypothesis -- 3. prototypical ci = overcome (control/domination): 'eat, consume, devour' ⇒ 'overcome, conquer, overpower, take over, destroy', etc. -- subject = agent (+ experiencer) or causer, object = theme or patient -- 4. prototypical shaa = undergoing: 'drink' ⇒ 'undergo, suffer, endure', etc -- subject = experiencer, object = stimulus -- 4.1 Shaa 'drink' ⇒ quantificational 'do X frequently, regularly' -- 5. identical environments where ci overcome [punctual] + x contrasts with shaa undergo [durative] + x -- 5.1 Possible neutralization: metaphorical ci + x = shaa + x -- 6. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Amharic eat and drink verbs -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Form, meaning, and morphosyntax of literal bәl- and t'әt'- -- 2.1 Form -- 2.2 Meaning -- 2.3 Morphosyntax -- 3. Figurative extensions of bәl- and t'әt'- -- 3.1 Internalization -- 3.2 Destruction -- 3.3 Affected agent -- 3.4 Nominalized uses -- 4. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Author index -- Language index -- Subject index -- The series Typological Studies in Language.
Summary: 'Eat' and 'drink' verbs in Amharic (Semitic) have a number of interesting linguistic properties. The basic morphosyntactic properties of these verbs in Amharic are reviewed, including the unusual patterning of these verbs in causative constructions, as remarked upon by Amberber (this volume) and others. Figurative extensions of the two verbs are prolific and an attempt is made to give a coherent account of these extensions drawing upon ideas from Newman's (1997) account of the English eat and drink extensions. In particular, it proves useful to distinguish figurative extensions based on the sensation of the consumer from figurative extensions based on the image of destruction or disappearance of the consumed entity. These two separate aspects of ingestive acts inform both the account of the figurative extensions of Amharic 'eat' and 'drink' as well as the morphosyntax associated with these verbs.
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The Linguistics of Eating and Drinking -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- References -- A cross-linguistic overview of 'eat' and 'drink' -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Central Meanings -- 3. Lexicalizations -- 4. Syntax with central meanings -- 5. Extensions based on the perfectivity of 'eat' -- 6. Extensions based on internalization -- 6.1 Extensions based on the sensation of the consumer -- 6.2 Pleasant inhaling, smoking etc -- 6.3 Emotional/intellectual satisfaction -- 6.4 Chepang emotive 'eat' suffix -- 6.5 To experience unpleasantness -- 6.6 Adversative passive -- 6.7 Hausa frequentative -- 7 Extensions based on the destruction of food -- 7.1 Physical destruction -- 7.2. Psychological torment -- 8. Extensions based on sensation and destruction -- 8.1 Eat one's words -- 8.2 Sexual intercourse -- 9. Eat' and 'drink' as salient human concepts -- 10. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- How transitive are eat and drink verbs? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Crosslinguistic data -- 2.1 Intransitive alternants -- 2.2 Labile verbs -- 2.3 Causativisation -- 2.4 Case-marking patterns -- 3. The affected agent -- 4. Affected agents and the transitive prototype -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Quirky alternations of transitivity -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Ingestives in a cross-linguistic perspective -- 3. Ingestives and ambitransitivity -- 3.1 The implicit object -- 3.2 The Lexical Structure of Ingestives -- 4. Ingestives as three-place predicates -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- All people eat and drink. does this mean that 'eat' and 'drink' are universal human concepts? -- 1. Introduction: universals of the human condition vs. universals of human thinking -- A human universal [A] -- A human universal [B] -- A human universal [C].

2. Metalanguage as a central problem for cross-linguistic semantics -- 3. Eating" and "drinking" in the Papuan Kalam -- The Kalam word ñb ('eat/drink') -- 4. The English verbs 'eat' and 'drink' seen from a Kalam perspective -- Someone (X) was eating something (Y) -- Someone (X) was drinking something (Y) -- 5. Eating" and "drinking" in the Australian language Warlpiri -- The Warlpiri word yilyi-wirrpirni ( 'to slurp, like kangaroo blood') -- 6. The English concept of 'sucking' and its closest counterparts in Warlpiri -- Someone (X) was sucking something (Y)   [e.g., a bottle] -- Someone (X) was sucking something (Y) from something (Z) -- 7. Drinking" in another Australian language, Arrernte -- Someone (X) was antyweme-ing ( 'drinking/sucking') something (juice, nectar -- blood -- mother's milk) -- 8. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- eating', 'drinking' and 'smoking' -- 1. The verb of 'consumption' and its semantics in Manambu -- 1.1 Eating, drinking and smoking: general remarks -- 1.2 Metaphorical consumption' in Manambu -- 1.3 Other verbs referring to food consumption -- 1.4 Eating' as the central meaning of the verb 'consume' -- 2. The status of the verb of consumption in Manambu -- 3. Verb of consumption' in Manambu: genetic and areal perspective -- Abbreviations -- References -- Athapaskan eating and drinking verbs and constructions -- 1. A focus on themes in the Dene languages -- 2. A brief overview of Dene clause structure and the Dene verb -- 3. Specialized" classificatory consumption verb stems in some Dene languages -- 4. Co-opted" classificatory consumption verb stems in other Dene languages -- 5. Manner and extent of consumption coding -- 5.1 Non-classificatory stem sources for manner-conflating consumption verbs -- 5.2 Prefix modulations affecting eating and drinking verbs.

6. Figurative eating and drinking in Dene languages -- 6.1 Metonymies -- 6.2 Metaphors -- 7. Hunger and thirst in Athapaskan -- 8. The lexical semantics of basic verbs and coming to terms with Athapaskan prehistory -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- References -- The semantic evolution of eat-expressions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Cognitive issues -- 3. Patterns of diffusion in Hindi-Urdu -- 4. Variation in the thematic roles of the subjects of EAT-expressions -- 5. Syntactic properties of EAT-expressions in Hindi-Urdu -- 6. EAT-expressions in Marathi (Indo-Aryan, southern neighbor of Hindi) -- A. Disappearance of EAT-expressions in Marathi -- B. Patterns of diffusion in Marathi -- B1 Cohyponymy -- B2 Hypernymy -- B3 Higher-level synonymy (tsop = maar): -- 7. Signs of a prehistoric radiation of EAT -- 8. Conclusions and conjectures -- Abbreviations -- References -- Literal and figurative uses of japanese eat and drink -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Morphosyntax with the central meaning -- 3. Eat' -- 3.1 Taberu, kuu, kurau -- 3.2 Shoku-suru -- 4. Drink' -- 4.1 Nomu, tashinamu -- 4.2 Tashinamu -- 5. Honorifics -- 6. Metaphoric extensions -- 6.1 Holding food in the mouth -- 6.2 Internalizing food -- 6.3 Biting food -- 6.4 Destruction of food -- 6.5 Swallowing food/liquid -- 6.6 Receiving food -- 7. Metonymic extensions -- 8. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Internet sources -- What (not) to eat or drink -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Basic syntax and semantics of mek- 'to eat' and masi- 'to drink' -- 3. Internal structure of eating and drinking -- 4. Metaphorical extensions of the verb mek- 'eat' -- 4.1 Agent-oriented extensions -- 4.2 Patient-oriented extensions -- 4.3 Extensions based on internalization and destruction -- 4.4 Why can you eat heat when you can't eat cold? -- 5. Social significance of eating and drinking in Korean (culture) -- 6. Conclusion.

Abbreviations -- References -- Metaphorical extensions of 'eat' ⇒[overcome] and 'drink' ⇒ [undergo] in hausa -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The hypothesis -- 3. prototypical ci = overcome (control/domination): 'eat, consume, devour' ⇒ 'overcome, conquer, overpower, take over, destroy', etc. -- subject = agent (+ experiencer) or causer, object = theme or patient -- 4. prototypical shaa = undergoing: 'drink' ⇒ 'undergo, suffer, endure', etc -- subject = experiencer, object = stimulus -- 4.1 Shaa 'drink' ⇒ quantificational 'do X frequently, regularly' -- 5. identical environments where ci overcome [punctual] + x contrasts with shaa undergo [durative] + x -- 5.1 Possible neutralization: metaphorical ci + x = shaa + x -- 6. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Amharic eat and drink verbs -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Form, meaning, and morphosyntax of literal bәl- and t'әt'- -- 2.1 Form -- 2.2 Meaning -- 2.3 Morphosyntax -- 3. Figurative extensions of bәl- and t'әt'- -- 3.1 Internalization -- 3.2 Destruction -- 3.3 Affected agent -- 3.4 Nominalized uses -- 4. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Author index -- Language index -- Subject index -- The series Typological Studies in Language.

'Eat' and 'drink' verbs in Amharic (Semitic) have a number of interesting linguistic properties. The basic morphosyntactic properties of these verbs in Amharic are reviewed, including the unusual patterning of these verbs in causative constructions, as remarked upon by Amberber (this volume) and others. Figurative extensions of the two verbs are prolific and an attempt is made to give a coherent account of these extensions drawing upon ideas from Newman's (1997) account of the English eat and drink extensions. In particular, it proves useful to distinguish figurative extensions based on the sensation of the consumer from figurative extensions based on the image of destruction or disappearance of the consumed entity. These two separate aspects of ingestive acts inform both the account of the figurative extensions of Amharic 'eat' and 'drink' as well as the morphosyntax associated with these verbs.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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