Language, Communication and the Economy.

By: Erreygers, GuidoContributor(s): Jacobs, GeertPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2005Copyright date: ©2005Description: 1 online resource (248 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789027294036Subject(s): Economics -- Language.;Discourse analysisGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Language, Communication and the EconomyDDC classification: 330.01/4 LOC classification: HB71 -- .L25 2005ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Language, Communication and the Economy -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- Aim -- Data -- Method -- Overview -- Critique -- Method -- History -- References -- I. Critique -- 1. Communication and commodification -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Language as a valuable commodity -- 2.1. Foreign language competence -- 2.2. Styling -- 2.3. Gendered speech -- 3. Authenticity -- 4. Skills -- 4.1. Communicative skills as discursive constructs -- 4.2. The good person -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 2. For-profit discourse in the nonprofit and public sectors -- 1. Introduction -- 2. How change is conveyed -- 3. The for-profit sector as a model and yardstick -- 4. Visual identities and naming practices -- 5. Genres and media -- 6. Lexical imports from the business domain -- 7. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 3. Education, discourse and the market -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Case: The merger of two schools of applied economics -- 3. The emerging role of the student -- 3.1. Student as customer, student as product, etc. -- 3.2. Diversity in reference -- 3.3. Passive students: The view from the new school's website -- 3.4. Passive students: Policy documents -- 3.5. Preliminary conclusions -- 4. Communication -- 4.1. Communicating the merger is important -- 4.2. Communicating the merger with restraint -- 4.3. The story of the kick-off -- 4.4. Preliminary conclusions -- 5. Conclusions and discussion -- Appendix 1. List of commonly used acronyms -- Appendix 2. Recent enrolments at the UFSIA and RUCA schools of economics -- Notes -- References -- References to unpublished documents and webpages -- II. Method -- 4. Headlines and cartoons in the economic press -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Theoretical foundations -- 2.1. Cognitive linguistics and conceptual metaphor theories.
2.2. Conceptual integration -- 3. Blending as discourse supportive strategy in economic discourse: A case study of headlines and cartoons -- 3.1. More and less, up and down… -- 3.2. Double grounding non-verticality examples -- 3.3. Double grounding as compression mechanism in cartoons -- 4. Summary and conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 5. Blended conceptualisation in trade flow diagrams -- 1. Objectives -- 2. Theoretical framework and basic cognitive notions -- 3. Data -- 4. Analysis -- 4.1. Static schemata -- 4.2. Motion schemata -- 4.3. Blends -- 5. Conclusions -- 5.1. Words as mental images -- 5.2. Graphs as artefacts -- Notes -- Data sources -- References -- 6. 'Models': Normative or technical? -- 1. Models in economics and management as the subject of a linguistic research programme -- 1.1. The Anglo-Saxon model vs. the European model -- 1.2. A CDA-inspired analysis of `models' -- 2. 'A new European Model' vs. Pondering the power of the market' -- 2.1. The source texts in the model debate as the structural basis of the article -- 2.2. CDA and a selection of surface phenomena -- 3. Financial markets and the business models: Beyond a technical role for the stock exchange -- 3.1. Financial markets in Izraelewicz's NEM -- 3.2. Financial markets in Münchau's PPM -- 3.3. The shareholder as the connecting element in two layers of analysis -- 4. A 'stakeholder' vs. a `shareholder' type of company -- 4.1. One definition of 'stakeholder company' -- 4.2. Evaluation and labelling of company models in the texts -- 4.3. A model of "business'' and "society'' -- 5. Conclusion: "The power of the market'' -- Notes -- References -- Appendix 1. The 'NEM' article -- Appendix 2. The 'PPM' article -- III. History -- 7. What goes up, must come down -- 1. Ordinary language and scientific discourse -- 2. The simple economics of Say's Law -- 3. The crisis as a sin.
4. The business cycle -- 5. Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 8. Outline of a genealogy of the value of the entrepreneur -- 1. Introduction -- 2. For a genealogy of value -- 3. From land and labour to the trinity formula -- 4. The birth of the entrepreneur -- 5. Discussion -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- 9. A. R. Orage and the reception of Douglas's social credit theory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The New Age as the cradle of Douglas's discourse -- 2.1. The New Age -- 2.2. Douglas as saviour? -- 2.3. The Aftermath -- 3. Douglas edited and explained! -- 3.1. Douglas edited -- 3.2. Douglas explained -- 4. Orage's Alphabet of Economics or `Ruskinian thought in the Machine Age' -- 4.1. The Alphabet of Economics -- 4.2. Production as energy conversion -- 4.3. Machines as metallic competitors for labour -- 4.4. Right to Work versus Right to Live -- 4.5. From an accounting deficiency to -- 5. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Name index -- Subject index -- The series Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture.
Summary: This volume brings together a number of wide-ranging, transdisciplinary research articles on the interface between discourse studies and economics. It explores in what way economics can contribute to the analysis of discursive practices in various institutional settings as well as investigating what role discourse studies can play in economic research. The contributors are linguists, communication scholars, economists and other social scientists drawing on various traditions including Critical Discourse Analysis, Cognitive Linguistics, ethnography and the literature on the rhetoric of economics and on economic storytelling. All articles are essentially empirical, focusing on the details of actual language use. The type of data analysed ranges from the minutes of university policy meetings and large-scale corpora of newspaper language, over books of economic theory from both well-respected economists and monetary cranks, to cartoons from The Economist.
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Language, Communication and the Economy -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- Aim -- Data -- Method -- Overview -- Critique -- Method -- History -- References -- I. Critique -- 1. Communication and commodification -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Language as a valuable commodity -- 2.1. Foreign language competence -- 2.2. Styling -- 2.3. Gendered speech -- 3. Authenticity -- 4. Skills -- 4.1. Communicative skills as discursive constructs -- 4.2. The good person -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- 2. For-profit discourse in the nonprofit and public sectors -- 1. Introduction -- 2. How change is conveyed -- 3. The for-profit sector as a model and yardstick -- 4. Visual identities and naming practices -- 5. Genres and media -- 6. Lexical imports from the business domain -- 7. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 3. Education, discourse and the market -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Case: The merger of two schools of applied economics -- 3. The emerging role of the student -- 3.1. Student as customer, student as product, etc. -- 3.2. Diversity in reference -- 3.3. Passive students: The view from the new school's website -- 3.4. Passive students: Policy documents -- 3.5. Preliminary conclusions -- 4. Communication -- 4.1. Communicating the merger is important -- 4.2. Communicating the merger with restraint -- 4.3. The story of the kick-off -- 4.4. Preliminary conclusions -- 5. Conclusions and discussion -- Appendix 1. List of commonly used acronyms -- Appendix 2. Recent enrolments at the UFSIA and RUCA schools of economics -- Notes -- References -- References to unpublished documents and webpages -- II. Method -- 4. Headlines and cartoons in the economic press -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Theoretical foundations -- 2.1. Cognitive linguistics and conceptual metaphor theories.

2.2. Conceptual integration -- 3. Blending as discourse supportive strategy in economic discourse: A case study of headlines and cartoons -- 3.1. More and less, up and down… -- 3.2. Double grounding non-verticality examples -- 3.3. Double grounding as compression mechanism in cartoons -- 4. Summary and conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 5. Blended conceptualisation in trade flow diagrams -- 1. Objectives -- 2. Theoretical framework and basic cognitive notions -- 3. Data -- 4. Analysis -- 4.1. Static schemata -- 4.2. Motion schemata -- 4.3. Blends -- 5. Conclusions -- 5.1. Words as mental images -- 5.2. Graphs as artefacts -- Notes -- Data sources -- References -- 6. 'Models': Normative or technical? -- 1. Models in economics and management as the subject of a linguistic research programme -- 1.1. The Anglo-Saxon model vs. the European model -- 1.2. A CDA-inspired analysis of `models' -- 2. 'A new European Model' vs. Pondering the power of the market' -- 2.1. The source texts in the model debate as the structural basis of the article -- 2.2. CDA and a selection of surface phenomena -- 3. Financial markets and the business models: Beyond a technical role for the stock exchange -- 3.1. Financial markets in Izraelewicz's NEM -- 3.2. Financial markets in Münchau's PPM -- 3.3. The shareholder as the connecting element in two layers of analysis -- 4. A 'stakeholder' vs. a `shareholder' type of company -- 4.1. One definition of 'stakeholder company' -- 4.2. Evaluation and labelling of company models in the texts -- 4.3. A model of "business'' and "society'' -- 5. Conclusion: "The power of the market'' -- Notes -- References -- Appendix 1. The 'NEM' article -- Appendix 2. The 'PPM' article -- III. History -- 7. What goes up, must come down -- 1. Ordinary language and scientific discourse -- 2. The simple economics of Say's Law -- 3. The crisis as a sin.

4. The business cycle -- 5. Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- 8. Outline of a genealogy of the value of the entrepreneur -- 1. Introduction -- 2. For a genealogy of value -- 3. From land and labour to the trinity formula -- 4. The birth of the entrepreneur -- 5. Discussion -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- 9. A. R. Orage and the reception of Douglas's social credit theory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The New Age as the cradle of Douglas's discourse -- 2.1. The New Age -- 2.2. Douglas as saviour? -- 2.3. The Aftermath -- 3. Douglas edited and explained! -- 3.1. Douglas edited -- 3.2. Douglas explained -- 4. Orage's Alphabet of Economics or `Ruskinian thought in the Machine Age' -- 4.1. The Alphabet of Economics -- 4.2. Production as energy conversion -- 4.3. Machines as metallic competitors for labour -- 4.4. Right to Work versus Right to Live -- 4.5. From an accounting deficiency to -- 5. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Name index -- Subject index -- The series Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture.

This volume brings together a number of wide-ranging, transdisciplinary research articles on the interface between discourse studies and economics. It explores in what way economics can contribute to the analysis of discursive practices in various institutional settings as well as investigating what role discourse studies can play in economic research. The contributors are linguists, communication scholars, economists and other social scientists drawing on various traditions including Critical Discourse Analysis, Cognitive Linguistics, ethnography and the literature on the rhetoric of economics and on economic storytelling. All articles are essentially empirical, focusing on the details of actual language use. The type of data analysed ranges from the minutes of university policy meetings and large-scale corpora of newspaper language, over books of economic theory from both well-respected economists and monetary cranks, to cartoons from The Economist.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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