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Functional Constraints in Grammar : On the unergative-unaccusative distinction.

By: Contributor(s): Publisher: Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2004Copyright date: ©2004Description: 1 online resource (253 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027295217
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Functional Constraints in Grammar : On the unergative–unaccusative distinctionDDC classification:
  • 415
LOC classification:
  • P291 -- .K859 2004eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Functional Constraints in Grammar -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC page -- Table of contents -- Acknowledgement -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The there-construction and unaccusativity -- 3. The way construction and unergativity -- 4. The cognate object construction and unergativity -- 5. The pseudo-passive construction and unergativity -- 6. Extraposition from subject NPs and unaccusativity -- 7. Conclusion -- Notes -- Notes to Chapter 1 -- Notes to Chapter 2 -- Notes to Chapter 3 -- Notes to Chapter 4 -- Notes to Chapter 5 -- Notes to Chapter 6 -- References -- Name index -- Subject index -- The series Constructional Approaches to Language.
Summary: This book examines in detail the acceptability status of sentences in the following five English constructions, and elucidates the syntactic, semantic, and functional requirements that the constructions must satisfy in order to be appropriately used: There-Construction, (One's) Way Construction, Cognate Object Construction, Pseudo-Passive Construction, and Extraposition from Subject NPs. It has been argued in the frameworks of Chomskyan generative grammar, relational grammar, conceptual semantics and other syntactic theories that the acceptability of sentences in these constructions can be accounted for by the unergative-unaccusative distinction of intransitive verbs. However, this book shows through a wide range of sentences that none of these constructions is sensitive to this distinction. For each construction, it shows that acceptability status is determined by a given sentence's semantic function as it interacts with syntactic constraints (which are independent of the unergative-unaccusative distinction), and with functional constraints that apply to it in its discourse context.
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Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00045343
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Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
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Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00045343
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Functional Constraints in Grammar -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC page -- Table of contents -- Acknowledgement -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The there-construction and unaccusativity -- 3. The way construction and unergativity -- 4. The cognate object construction and unergativity -- 5. The pseudo-passive construction and unergativity -- 6. Extraposition from subject NPs and unaccusativity -- 7. Conclusion -- Notes -- Notes to Chapter 1 -- Notes to Chapter 2 -- Notes to Chapter 3 -- Notes to Chapter 4 -- Notes to Chapter 5 -- Notes to Chapter 6 -- References -- Name index -- Subject index -- The series Constructional Approaches to Language.

This book examines in detail the acceptability status of sentences in the following five English constructions, and elucidates the syntactic, semantic, and functional requirements that the constructions must satisfy in order to be appropriately used: There-Construction, (One's) Way Construction, Cognate Object Construction, Pseudo-Passive Construction, and Extraposition from Subject NPs. It has been argued in the frameworks of Chomskyan generative grammar, relational grammar, conceptual semantics and other syntactic theories that the acceptability of sentences in these constructions can be accounted for by the unergative-unaccusative distinction of intransitive verbs. However, this book shows through a wide range of sentences that none of these constructions is sensitive to this distinction. For each construction, it shows that acceptability status is determined by a given sentence's semantic function as it interacts with syntactic constraints (which are independent of the unergative-unaccusative distinction), and with functional constraints that apply to it in its discourse context.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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