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Formulaic Language : Volume 2. Acquisition, loss, psychological reality, and functional explanations.

By: Contributor(s): Publisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (389 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027290168
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Formulaic Language : Volume 2. Acquisition, loss, psychological reality, and functional explanationsDDC classification:
  • 410
LOC classification:
  • P126 -- .F672 2009eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Formulaic Language -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Dedication -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Introduction. Approaches to the study of formulae -- 1. What are formulae? -- 2. Research questions -- 3. Synopsis of the book -- 3.1 Structure and distribution -- 3.2 Historical change -- 3.3 Acquisition and loss -- 3.4 Psychological reality -- 3.5 Explanations -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- Part I Acquisition and loss -- Repetition and reuse in child language learning -- Abstract -- 1. What is a speech formula and why? -- 1.1 Repetition and analogy -- 1.2 Segmentation, data compression and efficiency through redundancy -- 1.3 Children learn chunks from what they hear -- 2. Chunks may become analyzed -- 2.1 Slots provide the basis for developing more general categories -- 2.2 Productivity and creativity -- 2.3 The 'traceback' method -- 2.3.1 Results using the traceback method -- 3. Experimental evidence for multiword storage -- 4. Learning chunks and making errors -- 5. Typological differences -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Formulaic language from a learner perspective -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Formulaic language - some voices -- 3. Collocations - general -- 4. Collocations - some definitions -- 4.1 Collocations and nativelike selection -- 4.2 Frequency-based definitions -- 4.3 The phraseologist's view -- 4.4 Collocations in Mel'čuk's framework -- 4.5 The learner in focus -- 5. An alternative view of collocations -- 5.1 Psychological, social and cultural aspects of collocations -- 5.2 The notion of a keyword -- 5.3 Collocations and fusion of meaning -- 5.4 Collocations in terms of Lexical Functions -- 5.4.1 Verbal Lexical Functions -- 5.4.2 Adjectival Lexical Functions -- 5.5 Socio-culturally motivated collocations -- 5.6 Collocations in frames induced by topic.
6. Results of the native speaker/English language learner corpus study -- 6.1 Aim and procedure -- 6.2 Hypotheses -- 6.3 Collocations and 'Free' combinations over the N and NN data -- 6.4 Attempts by learners -- 7. Discussion of corpus study results -- 8. Overall discussion and implications for teaching -- References -- The acquisition and development of the topic marker wa in L1 Japanese -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1 Data -- 2.2 Coding -- 2.3 Data analysis -- 3. Results and discussion -- 3.1 Utterances containing wa -- 3.2 NP-wa? in mother-child interaction -- 3.2.1 How the mothers use NP-wa? -- 3.2.2 How children use NP-wa? -- 3.3 How the use of NP-wa? affects the overall process of language development -- 3.3.1 Joint attention and the use of NP-wa? -- 3.3.2 Development of a sentential structure -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Formulaic expressions in intermediate EFL writing assessment -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methodology -- 3. Analysis -- 4. Results -- 5. Discussion -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Connecting the dots to unpack the language -- Abstract -- 1. Background and assumptions -- 2. Evidence of unpacking -- 3. Forming pragmatic and semantic connections -- 4. Unpacking directional semantics -- 5. Unscrambling phonology and morphosyntax: The case of whatta -- 6. More phonology and morphosyntax: Unpacking didja -- 7. Conclusions -- References -- The effect of awareness-raising on the use of formulaic constructions -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Acquiring formulaic constructions -- 3. Research questions -- 4. Methodology -- 4.1 Participants -- 4.2 Materials -- 4.2.2 Treatment conditions -- 4.2.3 Target constructions -- 4.3 Analysis and scoring -- 4.4 Procedure -- 5. Results -- 6. Discussion and conclusion -- 7. Limitations -- Appendices -- Appendix A -- Appendix B -- References.
Can L2 learners productively use Japanese tense-aspect markers? -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction: Rule learning vs. Item learning -- 2. Inherent aspect and the Japanese tense-aspect markers -- 3. Method -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Materials and procedure -- 3.2.1 Acceptability judgment test -- 3.2.2 Procedure -- 4. Analysis and results -- 4.1 Lower proficiency learners -- 4.2 Higher proficiency learners -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1 Why is there more verb-specific use for resultative use of -te i-ru? -- 5.2 Distributional bias: What kind? -- 5.3 Verb-specific pattern vs. rule-based learning in L2 acquisition of tense-aspect -- 6. Conclusion -- Appendix -- References -- Formulaic and novel language in a 'dual process' model of language competence -- Abstract -- 1.1. Background -- 2.1. Definitions and description -- 2.2. How many are there? -- 2.3. How can we show that people know formulaic expressions? -- 2.4. Are they processed differently? Neurological localization of automatic speech -- 2.5. Other speech production studies -- 3.1. Summary of neurolinguistic studies: The dual process model -- 3.2. Dual process model and schemata -- 3.3. Comparison of formulaic expressions with schemata -- Appendices -- Appendix I. Some categories of formulaic language with German counterparts. -- Appendix II. Selected schemata -- References -- Part II Psychological reality -- The psycholinguistic reality of collocation and semantic prosody (2) -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Experiment: The effects of a verb's semantic prosody on semantic processing -- 2.1 Method -- 2.1.1 Participants -- 2.1.2 Materials -- 2.2 Procedure -- 2.3 Results -- 2.3.1 The relationship between semantic prosody and conceptual meaning -- 2.3.2 The effect of semantic prosody on affective priming -- 2.3.3 The effects of conceptual meaning upon affective priming.
2.3.4 Direct comparisons of conceptual meaning and semantic priming -- 3. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Frequency and the emergence of prefabs -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methods -- 2.1 Materials -- 2.2 Subjects and procedure -- 2.3 Measurement of frequency and duration -- 3. Results -- 3.1 p/ as a particle -- 3.2 Word-internal /^p/ -- 3.3 Summary of the results -- 4. Discussion -- 4.1 Theoretical interpretation -- 4.2 The facilitatory effect of word frequency on phoneme monitoring in word lists -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Part III Functional explanations -- Formulaic argumentation in scientific discourse -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The abstract as a genre of scientific discourse -- 3. Formulaic language in the linguistic realization of scientific argumentation -- 3.1 Four reporting strategies -- 3.2 Effects produced by the paper construction -- 4. Formulaic language with paper-like subjects in scientific English: Two corpus studies -- 4.1 Synchronic study -- 4.1.1 Corpus information -- 4.1.2 Reporting across academic disciplines -- 4.1.3 Formulaic language across the disciplines -- 4.2 Diachronic study -- 4.2.1 Corpus information -- 4.2.2 Reporting constructions in historical scientific English -- 5. Discussion of results -- 5.1 Politeness concerns -- 5.2 Changes in the rhetoric of scientific discourse -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Accepting responsibility at defendants' sentencing hearings -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Plan for the paper -- 3. Background on the right of allocution -- 4. Data -- 5. Federal sentencing hearings and "acceptance of responsibility" -- 6. Formulaic statements of acceptance of responsibility -- 7. Pros and cons of formulaic statements of acceptance of responsibility -- 8. Less formulaic statements of acceptance of responsibility.
9. Pros and cons of less formulaic statements of acceptance of reponsibility -- 10. Conclusions and implications -- Appendix A -- References -- Cases Cited -- Decorative symmetry in ritual (and everyday) language -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction: Galumphing, non-referential bulking and decorative symmetry in Khmer -- 2. The primacy of phonetic motivation for decorative servant words -- 2.1 Compounding by conscription -- 2.2 Compounding by prosthesis -- 2.3 Compounding via the "Adam's rib" strategy -- 2.4 Rhyme-swapping -- 2.5 Recursion: Decorative symmetry run wild -- 2.5.1 Synonym + Servant word compound -- 2.5.2 Etymological Doublets + Servant word compound -- 2.5.3 Synonym + Adam's Rib Compound -- 3. Non-referential bulking is not pragmatically motivated elsewhere -- 3.1 Baby talk/doggerel -- 3.2 Game trash talk -- 3.3 Aggressive" reduplication -- 3.4 Agreement -- 3.5 Structural priming -- 4. Conclusion -- 4.1 Style -- 4.2 Ritualization -- References -- Time management formulaic expressions in English and Thai -- Abstract -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Idea/image transfer' and 'time management formulaic expression (TMF)' -- 2. Time managing formulae in English -- 2.1 Fillers, hedges and discourse markers in English -- 2.2 A working definition of time-management formulaic expressions -- 2.3 Complement-taking predicates and TMF -- 2.4 Pseudo-cleft and TMF -- 2.5 An interim summary -- 3. Time managing formulae in Thai -- 3.1 Fillers, hedges and discourse markers -- 3.2 Time-management formula: The /__ nîa/construction -- 3.3 Challengeable" information and /nîa/ -- 3.4 An interim summary -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Routinized uses of the first person expression for me in conversational discourse -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction to the study -- 2. Routinized expressions ~ routine functions -- 3. For me as a first person singular expression.
3.1 Studies of first person elements and prepatterned expression.
Summary: This book is the second of the two-volume collection of papers on formulaic language. The collection is among the first in the field. The authors of the papers in this volume represent a diverse group of international scholars in linguistics and psychology. The language data analyzed come from a variety of languages, including Arabic, Japanese, Polish, and Spanish, and include analyses of styles and genres within these languages. While the first volume focuses on the very definition of linguistic formulae and on their grammatical, semantic, stylistic, and historical aspects, the second volume explores how formulae are acquired and lost by speakers of a language, in what way they are psychologically real, and what their functions in discourse are. Since most of the papers are readily accessible to readers with only basic familiarity with linguistics, the book may be used in courses on discourse structure, pragmatics, semantics, language acquisition, and syntax, as well as being a resource in linguistic research.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00045327
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00045327
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Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
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Formulaic Language -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Dedication -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Introduction. Approaches to the study of formulae -- 1. What are formulae? -- 2. Research questions -- 3. Synopsis of the book -- 3.1 Structure and distribution -- 3.2 Historical change -- 3.3 Acquisition and loss -- 3.4 Psychological reality -- 3.5 Explanations -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- Part I Acquisition and loss -- Repetition and reuse in child language learning -- Abstract -- 1. What is a speech formula and why? -- 1.1 Repetition and analogy -- 1.2 Segmentation, data compression and efficiency through redundancy -- 1.3 Children learn chunks from what they hear -- 2. Chunks may become analyzed -- 2.1 Slots provide the basis for developing more general categories -- 2.2 Productivity and creativity -- 2.3 The 'traceback' method -- 2.3.1 Results using the traceback method -- 3. Experimental evidence for multiword storage -- 4. Learning chunks and making errors -- 5. Typological differences -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Formulaic language from a learner perspective -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Formulaic language - some voices -- 3. Collocations - general -- 4. Collocations - some definitions -- 4.1 Collocations and nativelike selection -- 4.2 Frequency-based definitions -- 4.3 The phraseologist's view -- 4.4 Collocations in Mel'čuk's framework -- 4.5 The learner in focus -- 5. An alternative view of collocations -- 5.1 Psychological, social and cultural aspects of collocations -- 5.2 The notion of a keyword -- 5.3 Collocations and fusion of meaning -- 5.4 Collocations in terms of Lexical Functions -- 5.4.1 Verbal Lexical Functions -- 5.4.2 Adjectival Lexical Functions -- 5.5 Socio-culturally motivated collocations -- 5.6 Collocations in frames induced by topic.

6. Results of the native speaker/English language learner corpus study -- 6.1 Aim and procedure -- 6.2 Hypotheses -- 6.3 Collocations and 'Free' combinations over the N and NN data -- 6.4 Attempts by learners -- 7. Discussion of corpus study results -- 8. Overall discussion and implications for teaching -- References -- The acquisition and development of the topic marker wa in L1 Japanese -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1 Data -- 2.2 Coding -- 2.3 Data analysis -- 3. Results and discussion -- 3.1 Utterances containing wa -- 3.2 NP-wa? in mother-child interaction -- 3.2.1 How the mothers use NP-wa? -- 3.2.2 How children use NP-wa? -- 3.3 How the use of NP-wa? affects the overall process of language development -- 3.3.1 Joint attention and the use of NP-wa? -- 3.3.2 Development of a sentential structure -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Formulaic expressions in intermediate EFL writing assessment -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methodology -- 3. Analysis -- 4. Results -- 5. Discussion -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Connecting the dots to unpack the language -- Abstract -- 1. Background and assumptions -- 2. Evidence of unpacking -- 3. Forming pragmatic and semantic connections -- 4. Unpacking directional semantics -- 5. Unscrambling phonology and morphosyntax: The case of whatta -- 6. More phonology and morphosyntax: Unpacking didja -- 7. Conclusions -- References -- The effect of awareness-raising on the use of formulaic constructions -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Acquiring formulaic constructions -- 3. Research questions -- 4. Methodology -- 4.1 Participants -- 4.2 Materials -- 4.2.2 Treatment conditions -- 4.2.3 Target constructions -- 4.3 Analysis and scoring -- 4.4 Procedure -- 5. Results -- 6. Discussion and conclusion -- 7. Limitations -- Appendices -- Appendix A -- Appendix B -- References.

Can L2 learners productively use Japanese tense-aspect markers? -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction: Rule learning vs. Item learning -- 2. Inherent aspect and the Japanese tense-aspect markers -- 3. Method -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Materials and procedure -- 3.2.1 Acceptability judgment test -- 3.2.2 Procedure -- 4. Analysis and results -- 4.1 Lower proficiency learners -- 4.2 Higher proficiency learners -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1 Why is there more verb-specific use for resultative use of -te i-ru? -- 5.2 Distributional bias: What kind? -- 5.3 Verb-specific pattern vs. rule-based learning in L2 acquisition of tense-aspect -- 6. Conclusion -- Appendix -- References -- Formulaic and novel language in a 'dual process' model of language competence -- Abstract -- 1.1. Background -- 2.1. Definitions and description -- 2.2. How many are there? -- 2.3. How can we show that people know formulaic expressions? -- 2.4. Are they processed differently? Neurological localization of automatic speech -- 2.5. Other speech production studies -- 3.1. Summary of neurolinguistic studies: The dual process model -- 3.2. Dual process model and schemata -- 3.3. Comparison of formulaic expressions with schemata -- Appendices -- Appendix I. Some categories of formulaic language with German counterparts. -- Appendix II. Selected schemata -- References -- Part II Psychological reality -- The psycholinguistic reality of collocation and semantic prosody (2) -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Experiment: The effects of a verb's semantic prosody on semantic processing -- 2.1 Method -- 2.1.1 Participants -- 2.1.2 Materials -- 2.2 Procedure -- 2.3 Results -- 2.3.1 The relationship between semantic prosody and conceptual meaning -- 2.3.2 The effect of semantic prosody on affective priming -- 2.3.3 The effects of conceptual meaning upon affective priming.

2.3.4 Direct comparisons of conceptual meaning and semantic priming -- 3. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Frequency and the emergence of prefabs -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methods -- 2.1 Materials -- 2.2 Subjects and procedure -- 2.3 Measurement of frequency and duration -- 3. Results -- 3.1 p/ as a particle -- 3.2 Word-internal /^p/ -- 3.3 Summary of the results -- 4. Discussion -- 4.1 Theoretical interpretation -- 4.2 The facilitatory effect of word frequency on phoneme monitoring in word lists -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Part III Functional explanations -- Formulaic argumentation in scientific discourse -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The abstract as a genre of scientific discourse -- 3. Formulaic language in the linguistic realization of scientific argumentation -- 3.1 Four reporting strategies -- 3.2 Effects produced by the paper construction -- 4. Formulaic language with paper-like subjects in scientific English: Two corpus studies -- 4.1 Synchronic study -- 4.1.1 Corpus information -- 4.1.2 Reporting across academic disciplines -- 4.1.3 Formulaic language across the disciplines -- 4.2 Diachronic study -- 4.2.1 Corpus information -- 4.2.2 Reporting constructions in historical scientific English -- 5. Discussion of results -- 5.1 Politeness concerns -- 5.2 Changes in the rhetoric of scientific discourse -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Accepting responsibility at defendants' sentencing hearings -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Plan for the paper -- 3. Background on the right of allocution -- 4. Data -- 5. Federal sentencing hearings and "acceptance of responsibility" -- 6. Formulaic statements of acceptance of responsibility -- 7. Pros and cons of formulaic statements of acceptance of responsibility -- 8. Less formulaic statements of acceptance of responsibility.

9. Pros and cons of less formulaic statements of acceptance of reponsibility -- 10. Conclusions and implications -- Appendix A -- References -- Cases Cited -- Decorative symmetry in ritual (and everyday) language -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction: Galumphing, non-referential bulking and decorative symmetry in Khmer -- 2. The primacy of phonetic motivation for decorative servant words -- 2.1 Compounding by conscription -- 2.2 Compounding by prosthesis -- 2.3 Compounding via the "Adam's rib" strategy -- 2.4 Rhyme-swapping -- 2.5 Recursion: Decorative symmetry run wild -- 2.5.1 Synonym + Servant word compound -- 2.5.2 Etymological Doublets + Servant word compound -- 2.5.3 Synonym + Adam's Rib Compound -- 3. Non-referential bulking is not pragmatically motivated elsewhere -- 3.1 Baby talk/doggerel -- 3.2 Game trash talk -- 3.3 Aggressive" reduplication -- 3.4 Agreement -- 3.5 Structural priming -- 4. Conclusion -- 4.1 Style -- 4.2 Ritualization -- References -- Time management formulaic expressions in English and Thai -- Abstract -- 0. Introduction -- 1. Idea/image transfer' and 'time management formulaic expression (TMF)' -- 2. Time managing formulae in English -- 2.1 Fillers, hedges and discourse markers in English -- 2.2 A working definition of time-management formulaic expressions -- 2.3 Complement-taking predicates and TMF -- 2.4 Pseudo-cleft and TMF -- 2.5 An interim summary -- 3. Time managing formulae in Thai -- 3.1 Fillers, hedges and discourse markers -- 3.2 Time-management formula: The /__ nîa/construction -- 3.3 Challengeable" information and /nîa/ -- 3.4 An interim summary -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Routinized uses of the first person expression for me in conversational discourse -- Abstract -- 1. Introduction to the study -- 2. Routinized expressions ~ routine functions -- 3. For me as a first person singular expression.

3.1 Studies of first person elements and prepatterned expression.

This book is the second of the two-volume collection of papers on formulaic language. The collection is among the first in the field. The authors of the papers in this volume represent a diverse group of international scholars in linguistics and psychology. The language data analyzed come from a variety of languages, including Arabic, Japanese, Polish, and Spanish, and include analyses of styles and genres within these languages. While the first volume focuses on the very definition of linguistic formulae and on their grammatical, semantic, stylistic, and historical aspects, the second volume explores how formulae are acquired and lost by speakers of a language, in what way they are psychologically real, and what their functions in discourse are. Since most of the papers are readily accessible to readers with only basic familiarity with linguistics, the book may be used in courses on discourse structure, pragmatics, semantics, language acquisition, and syntax, as well as being a resource in linguistic research.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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