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English with a Latin Beat : Studies in Portuguese/Spanish - English Interphonology.

By: Contributor(s): Publisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2006Copyright date: ©2006Description: 1 online resource (221 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027292797
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: English with a Latin Beat : Studies in Portuguese/Spanish – English InterphonologyDDC classification:
  • 421/.52
LOC classification:
  • PE1137 -- .E567 2006eb
Online resources:
Contents:
English with a Latin Beat -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- The scope of this collection -- Theoretical models of L2 phonological acquisition -- Overview of the papers -- Segmental-level studies -- Syllable-level studies -- Prosodic-level studies: Stress and rhythm -- Some general implications -- Acknowledgment -- References -- I. Segmental-level studies: Vowels -- Adult phonetic learning of a second language vowel system -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Participants -- 2.2. Procedure -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Construction of the early IL vowel system -- 3.2. Evolution of the IL vowel system -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Appendix A: English Corpus -- Appendix B: Portuguese Corpus -- The phonological and phonetic development of new vowel contrasts in Spanish learners of English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The experiment -- 2.1. Subjects and materials -- 2.2. Procedure -- 2.3. Results for the /I/-/i/ phonological contrast (AC continuum) -- 2.4. Results for the phonetic treatment of the contrast: Cue weighting and reliance -- 2.5. Patterns in L2 individual phonetic perception -- 3. Discussion -- 3.1. Linguistic or auditory strategies in L2 perception -- 3.2. Different performance by four L2 subjects -- 3.3. L2 performance patterns and a possible stage-like development -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- Age and native language influence on the perception of English vowels -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Subjects -- 2.2. Stimuli -- 2.3. Procedure -- 2.4. Analyses -- 3. Results -- 4. Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Appendix -- II. Syllable-level studies: Codas and onset clusters -- The influence of voicing and sonority relationships on the production of English final consonants -- 1. Introduction.
2. Single-consonant codas in Portuguese-English interlanguage -- 3. Method -- 4. Results -- 4.1. Markedness of the target segment -- 4.2. Influence of phonological environment -- 5. Theoretical implications -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Perception and production of vowel paragoge by Brazilian EFL students -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Production test -- 2.2. Perception test -- 3. Results and discussion -- 4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Appendix A -- Appendix B -- The sonority cycle and the acquisition of complex onsets -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background on the syllable -- 2.1. The length of margins and markedness -- 2.2. Sonority sequencing -- 2.3. Sonority cycle -- 3. Study one -- 3.1. The reduction of margins -- 3.2. Hypotheses -- 3.3. Method -- 3.4. Results -- 3.5. Discussion -- 4. Study two -- 4.1. Background -- 4.2. Studies testing sonority sequencing -- 4.3. Hypotheses -- 4.4. Method -- 4.5. Results -- 4.6. Discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- The influence of voicing on the production of initial /s/-clusters by Brazilian learners -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Influence of length of cluster -- 3.2. Influence of the sonority sequencing principle -- 3.3. Influence of environment -- 4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Appendix -- Production of English initial /s/-clusters by speakers of Brazilian Portuguese and Argentine Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Review of the literature -- 3. Method -- 3.1. Participants -- 3.2. Material -- 3.3. Transcription -- 4. Results and discussion -- 4.1. Length of cluster -- 4.2. Internal structure of cluster: /s/+obstruent versus /s/+sonorant -- 4.3. Internal structure of cluster: /s/+nasal versus /s/+lateral -- 4.4. Voicing assimilation of /s/ + sonorant clusters by BP speakers -- 4.5. Phonological environment -- 5. Conclusion.
Acknowledgements -- References -- III. Prosodic-level studies: Stress and rhythm -- Variability in the use of weak forms of prepositions -- 1. Vowel reduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Data collection -- 2.2. Variables -- 3. Results -- 4. General discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Perception of double stress by Spanish learners of English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Perception of stress shift -- 3.2. Perception of stress strength -- 4. General discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Appendix -- The production of compound stress by Brazilian learners of English -- 1. Compound and phrasal stress -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Participants -- 2.2. Production task -- 2.3. Procedures -- 2.4. Data analysis -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Stress pattern -- 3.2. Constituent length -- 3.3. Stress pattern and length of token -- 4. Discussion of results -- 4.1. Compounds -- 4.2. Phrasal-stressed tokens -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Appendix -- Examples of sentences used in the production test -- Author index -- Subject index -- The series Studies in Bilingualism.
Summary: This paper describes an analysis of the stress patterns used by advanced Brazilian learners in the production of English compound nouns. It was predicted that the lack of distinction between composite nominals and compound nouns in Portuguese would strongly influence the participants to assign primary stress to the final constituent, regardless of the syntax. Data were collected by means of a reading activity which included the target constructions in unrelated sentences. Results confirmed a strong tendency for participants to give greater prominence to the second constituent of compounds, although exceptions to this tendency indicated that the participants' choice of stress pattern may also have been influenced by the length of constituents and relative familiarity of the lexical items involved.
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English with a Latin Beat -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- The scope of this collection -- Theoretical models of L2 phonological acquisition -- Overview of the papers -- Segmental-level studies -- Syllable-level studies -- Prosodic-level studies: Stress and rhythm -- Some general implications -- Acknowledgment -- References -- I. Segmental-level studies: Vowels -- Adult phonetic learning of a second language vowel system -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Participants -- 2.2. Procedure -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Construction of the early IL vowel system -- 3.2. Evolution of the IL vowel system -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Appendix A: English Corpus -- Appendix B: Portuguese Corpus -- The phonological and phonetic development of new vowel contrasts in Spanish learners of English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The experiment -- 2.1. Subjects and materials -- 2.2. Procedure -- 2.3. Results for the /I/-/i/ phonological contrast (AC continuum) -- 2.4. Results for the phonetic treatment of the contrast: Cue weighting and reliance -- 2.5. Patterns in L2 individual phonetic perception -- 3. Discussion -- 3.1. Linguistic or auditory strategies in L2 perception -- 3.2. Different performance by four L2 subjects -- 3.3. L2 performance patterns and a possible stage-like development -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- Age and native language influence on the perception of English vowels -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Subjects -- 2.2. Stimuli -- 2.3. Procedure -- 2.4. Analyses -- 3. Results -- 4. Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Appendix -- II. Syllable-level studies: Codas and onset clusters -- The influence of voicing and sonority relationships on the production of English final consonants -- 1. Introduction.

2. Single-consonant codas in Portuguese-English interlanguage -- 3. Method -- 4. Results -- 4.1. Markedness of the target segment -- 4.2. Influence of phonological environment -- 5. Theoretical implications -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Perception and production of vowel paragoge by Brazilian EFL students -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Production test -- 2.2. Perception test -- 3. Results and discussion -- 4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Appendix A -- Appendix B -- The sonority cycle and the acquisition of complex onsets -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background on the syllable -- 2.1. The length of margins and markedness -- 2.2. Sonority sequencing -- 2.3. Sonority cycle -- 3. Study one -- 3.1. The reduction of margins -- 3.2. Hypotheses -- 3.3. Method -- 3.4. Results -- 3.5. Discussion -- 4. Study two -- 4.1. Background -- 4.2. Studies testing sonority sequencing -- 4.3. Hypotheses -- 4.4. Method -- 4.5. Results -- 4.6. Discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- The influence of voicing on the production of initial /s/-clusters by Brazilian learners -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Influence of length of cluster -- 3.2. Influence of the sonority sequencing principle -- 3.3. Influence of environment -- 4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Appendix -- Production of English initial /s/-clusters by speakers of Brazilian Portuguese and Argentine Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Review of the literature -- 3. Method -- 3.1. Participants -- 3.2. Material -- 3.3. Transcription -- 4. Results and discussion -- 4.1. Length of cluster -- 4.2. Internal structure of cluster: /s/+obstruent versus /s/+sonorant -- 4.3. Internal structure of cluster: /s/+nasal versus /s/+lateral -- 4.4. Voicing assimilation of /s/ + sonorant clusters by BP speakers -- 4.5. Phonological environment -- 5. Conclusion.

Acknowledgements -- References -- III. Prosodic-level studies: Stress and rhythm -- Variability in the use of weak forms of prepositions -- 1. Vowel reduction -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Data collection -- 2.2. Variables -- 3. Results -- 4. General discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Perception of double stress by Spanish learners of English -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Method -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Perception of stress shift -- 3.2. Perception of stress strength -- 4. General discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Appendix -- The production of compound stress by Brazilian learners of English -- 1. Compound and phrasal stress -- 2. Method -- 2.1. Participants -- 2.2. Production task -- 2.3. Procedures -- 2.4. Data analysis -- 3. Results -- 3.1. Stress pattern -- 3.2. Constituent length -- 3.3. Stress pattern and length of token -- 4. Discussion of results -- 4.1. Compounds -- 4.2. Phrasal-stressed tokens -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Appendix -- Examples of sentences used in the production test -- Author index -- Subject index -- The series Studies in Bilingualism.

This paper describes an analysis of the stress patterns used by advanced Brazilian learners in the production of English compound nouns. It was predicted that the lack of distinction between composite nominals and compound nouns in Portuguese would strongly influence the participants to assign primary stress to the final constituent, regardless of the syntax. Data were collected by means of a reading activity which included the target constructions in unrelated sentences. Results confirmed a strong tendency for participants to give greater prominence to the second constituent of compounds, although exceptions to this tendency indicated that the participants' choice of stress pattern may also have been influenced by the length of constituents and relative familiarity of the lexical items involved.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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