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Early Modern English News Discourse : Newspapers, pamphlets and scientific news discourse.

By: Publisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (240 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027289476
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Early Modern English News Discourse : Newspapers, pamphlets and scientific news discourseDDC classification:
  • 072
LOC classification:
  • PN5115 -- .C55 2007eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Early Modern English News Discourse -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Newspapers, pamphlets and scientific news discourse in Early Modern Britain -- References -- Newspapers -- Crime and punishmen -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Identifying text classes -- 3. Borderline cases -- 3.1 Introductory whereas -- 3.2 Introductory past participle -- 4. Crime reports proper -- 4.1 Time reference -- 4.2 The grammatical subject: The victim and the criminal -- 4.3 The crime itself -- 4.4 Information surrounding the crime -- 4.5 Newspaper commentaries -- 5. Punishment -- 5.1 Imprisonment -- 5.2 Sentence -- 5.3 Trials -- 6. Summary and outlook -- References -- Reading late eighteenth-century want ads -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The conventions of the "WANTS a Place" advertisement -- 2.1 "Genteel" -- 2.2 "Character" -- 2.3 "From the month" -- 2.4 "Understands business" -- 2.5 "Professed" -- 2.6 "In or out of livery" -- 2.7 "No office-keepers" and "principals only" -- 2.8 "Can bear confinement" and "followers" -- 2.9 "Of light weight" and "either way" -- 2.10 "Go a job" and "go the circuit" -- 2.11 "Flatters him/herself " -- 2.12 "Both capacities" -- 3. Summary -- Sources -- References -- "Alwayes in te Orbe of honest Mirth, and next to Truth" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Welch Mercury -- 2.1 Wit and mirth in The Welch Mercury numbers 1-3 -- 2.2 News in The Welch Mercury numbers 1-3 -- 2.3 Mirth in The Welch Mercury numbers 4-8 -- 2.4 News in The Welch Mercury numbers 4-8 -- 3. Conclusion -- References -- Religious language in early English newspapers? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Comparing two corpora: Keywords -- 3. Linguistic analysis -- 3.1 Selected keywords in the ZEN Corpus: Distribution across sub-genres and typical uses -- 3.2 Selected keywords: Collocations in prayers and news discourse -- 4. Conclusions -- References.
"As silly as an Irish Teague" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Comparison -- 3. The data -- 4. Functions of comparisons in newspapers -- 5. Further aspects of comparisons -- 6. Conclusion -- Sources -- References -- "Place yer bets" and "Let us hope" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Preparing the analysis: The communicative situation in newspapers -- 3. Imperatives in the RNC: Quantitative results -- 4. Formal aspects: "Ordinary" imperatives and let-constructions -- 5. Pragmatic analysis of imperatives -- 5.1 General characteristics -- 5.2 Communicative constellations -- 5.3 Detailed account of pragmatic functions -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Pamphlets -- Comparing seventeenth-century news broadsides and occasional news pamphlets -- "From you, my Lord, professions are but words - -- 1. Aims and objectives -- 2. The data -- 3. Some information on the context -- 3.1 The socio-historical and political background -- 3.2 The participants -- 4. Outline of impoliteness research -- 5. The realisation of impoliteness in anti/unionist discourse -- 6. Analysis: On record strategies -- 6.1 Rhetorical and response seeking challenges -- 6.2 Negative impoliteness strategies -- 6.3 Positive impoliteness strategies -- 7. Off record strategies -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- 1. Introduction -- 2. "Strange and Wonderfull Newes" in broadsides and occasional pamphlets -- 3. The rhetoric of news discourse: Schema categories and persuasive content features -- 4. News presentation on the front page: Major headlines, proto-leads and woodcuts -- 5. Structuring of the episode -- 6. Conclusion -- Sources -- References -- Scientific news discourse -- "Joyful News out of the Newfound World" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Aim and method of the paper -- 3. What do we mean by news reports? -- 4. The structure of news reports.
5. News in the corpus of Early Modern English Medical Texts -- 6. An early domestic news report -- 7. Foreign news -- 7.1 Of the newe la~des and of ye people (1520?) -- 7.2 A new iuterlude [sic] … of dyuers straunge landys and of dyuers straunge effects [and] causis (1520?) -- 7.3 Ioyfull nevves out of the newe founde worlde… (1580) -- 8. Conclusions -- Sources -- Bibliography -- News filtering processes in the Philosophical Transactions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Channels of scientific news discourse in the seventeenth century -- 3. Henry Oldenburg: The first editor of the Philosophical Transactions -- 4. Oldenburg's news filters -- 4.1 The quantitative filter -- 4.2 The qualitative filter -- 5. Discussion of results -- 6. Conclusion -- Primary source -- References -- Index -- The Pragmatics & Beyond New Series.
Summary: In Early Modern Britain, new publication channels were developed and new textual genres established themselves. News discourse became increasingly more important and reached wider audiences, with pamphlets as the first real mass media. Newspapers appeared, first on a weekly and then on a daily basis. And scientific news discourse in the form of letters exchanged between fellow scholars turned into academic journals. The papers in this volume provide state-of-the art analyses of these developments. The first part of the volume contains studies of early newspapers that range from reports of crime and punishment to want ads, and from traces of religious language in early newspapers to the use of imperatives. The second part is devoted to pamphlets and provides detailed analyses of news reporting and of impoliteness strategies. The last section is devoted to scientific news discourse and traces the early publication formats in their various manifestations.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00045261
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00045261
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
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Early Modern English News Discourse -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Newspapers, pamphlets and scientific news discourse in Early Modern Britain -- References -- Newspapers -- Crime and punishmen -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Identifying text classes -- 3. Borderline cases -- 3.1 Introductory whereas -- 3.2 Introductory past participle -- 4. Crime reports proper -- 4.1 Time reference -- 4.2 The grammatical subject: The victim and the criminal -- 4.3 The crime itself -- 4.4 Information surrounding the crime -- 4.5 Newspaper commentaries -- 5. Punishment -- 5.1 Imprisonment -- 5.2 Sentence -- 5.3 Trials -- 6. Summary and outlook -- References -- Reading late eighteenth-century want ads -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The conventions of the "WANTS a Place" advertisement -- 2.1 "Genteel" -- 2.2 "Character" -- 2.3 "From the month" -- 2.4 "Understands business" -- 2.5 "Professed" -- 2.6 "In or out of livery" -- 2.7 "No office-keepers" and "principals only" -- 2.8 "Can bear confinement" and "followers" -- 2.9 "Of light weight" and "either way" -- 2.10 "Go a job" and "go the circuit" -- 2.11 "Flatters him/herself " -- 2.12 "Both capacities" -- 3. Summary -- Sources -- References -- "Alwayes in te Orbe of honest Mirth, and next to Truth" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Welch Mercury -- 2.1 Wit and mirth in The Welch Mercury numbers 1-3 -- 2.2 News in The Welch Mercury numbers 1-3 -- 2.3 Mirth in The Welch Mercury numbers 4-8 -- 2.4 News in The Welch Mercury numbers 4-8 -- 3. Conclusion -- References -- Religious language in early English newspapers? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Comparing two corpora: Keywords -- 3. Linguistic analysis -- 3.1 Selected keywords in the ZEN Corpus: Distribution across sub-genres and typical uses -- 3.2 Selected keywords: Collocations in prayers and news discourse -- 4. Conclusions -- References.

"As silly as an Irish Teague" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Comparison -- 3. The data -- 4. Functions of comparisons in newspapers -- 5. Further aspects of comparisons -- 6. Conclusion -- Sources -- References -- "Place yer bets" and "Let us hope" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Preparing the analysis: The communicative situation in newspapers -- 3. Imperatives in the RNC: Quantitative results -- 4. Formal aspects: "Ordinary" imperatives and let-constructions -- 5. Pragmatic analysis of imperatives -- 5.1 General characteristics -- 5.2 Communicative constellations -- 5.3 Detailed account of pragmatic functions -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Pamphlets -- Comparing seventeenth-century news broadsides and occasional news pamphlets -- "From you, my Lord, professions are but words - -- 1. Aims and objectives -- 2. The data -- 3. Some information on the context -- 3.1 The socio-historical and political background -- 3.2 The participants -- 4. Outline of impoliteness research -- 5. The realisation of impoliteness in anti/unionist discourse -- 6. Analysis: On record strategies -- 6.1 Rhetorical and response seeking challenges -- 6.2 Negative impoliteness strategies -- 6.3 Positive impoliteness strategies -- 7. Off record strategies -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- 1. Introduction -- 2. "Strange and Wonderfull Newes" in broadsides and occasional pamphlets -- 3. The rhetoric of news discourse: Schema categories and persuasive content features -- 4. News presentation on the front page: Major headlines, proto-leads and woodcuts -- 5. Structuring of the episode -- 6. Conclusion -- Sources -- References -- Scientific news discourse -- "Joyful News out of the Newfound World" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Aim and method of the paper -- 3. What do we mean by news reports? -- 4. The structure of news reports.

5. News in the corpus of Early Modern English Medical Texts -- 6. An early domestic news report -- 7. Foreign news -- 7.1 Of the newe la~des and of ye people (1520?) -- 7.2 A new iuterlude [sic] … of dyuers straunge landys and of dyuers straunge effects [and] causis (1520?) -- 7.3 Ioyfull nevves out of the newe founde worlde… (1580) -- 8. Conclusions -- Sources -- Bibliography -- News filtering processes in the Philosophical Transactions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Channels of scientific news discourse in the seventeenth century -- 3. Henry Oldenburg: The first editor of the Philosophical Transactions -- 4. Oldenburg's news filters -- 4.1 The quantitative filter -- 4.2 The qualitative filter -- 5. Discussion of results -- 6. Conclusion -- Primary source -- References -- Index -- The Pragmatics & Beyond New Series.

In Early Modern Britain, new publication channels were developed and new textual genres established themselves. News discourse became increasingly more important and reached wider audiences, with pamphlets as the first real mass media. Newspapers appeared, first on a weekly and then on a daily basis. And scientific news discourse in the form of letters exchanged between fellow scholars turned into academic journals. The papers in this volume provide state-of-the art analyses of these developments. The first part of the volume contains studies of early newspapers that range from reports of crime and punishment to want ads, and from traces of religious language in early newspapers to the use of imperatives. The second part is devoted to pamphlets and provides detailed analyses of news reporting and of impoliteness strategies. The last section is devoted to scientific news discourse and traces the early publication formats in their various manifestations.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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