Breaking Ground : Travel and National Culture in Russia from Peter I to the Era of Pushkin.

By: Dickinson, SaraSeries: Studies in Slavic Literature and Poetics, 45Publisher: Amsterdam : Editions Rodopi, 2006Copyright date: ©2006Description: 1 online resource (292 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789401202718Subject(s): Fonvizin, D. I. -- (Denis Ivanovich), -- 1745-1792.;Karamzin, Nikolaĭ Mikhaĭlovich, -- 1766-1826.;Radishchev, Aleksandr Nikolaevich, -- 1749-1802.;Russian literature -- 18th century.;Russian literature -- 19th century.;Russians -- Travel.;Travel writingGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Breaking Ground : Travel and National Culture in Russia from Peter I to the Era of PushkinDDC classification: 891.70932 LOC classification: PG2987.T72 -- D53 2006ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Note on Transliteration and Citations -- Introduction -- The Literary Mode of Travel Writing -- Travel Writing and National Consciousness -- Travel Writing and Imaginary Geography -- 1. Fonvizin and the Russian Tour of Western Europe (1689-1789) -- 1. Petrine Tourism: The Diary of Boris Kurakin -- 2. Educational Travel: The Voyage of Aleksandr Kurakin -- 3. The Literary Style of Ekaterina Dashkova -- 4. Fonvizin and France -- 5. Alternative Routes: Fonvizin's Later Letters and Spa Diaries -- 6. The Trajectory of a Freemason: Vasily Zinoviev -- 2. Radishchev and Domestic Description (1767-97) -- 1. Science and State in the Conception of Internal Travel Writing -- 2. Sentiment and Social Criticism -- 3. Radishchev and the Poetics of the National Landscape -- 4. Radishchev in Siberia: Letters and Diaries, 1790-97 -- 3. Karamzin and the Internal Account (1791-1812) -- 1. Karamzin's Traveler and Text -- 2. Sentimentalist Imitation and Parody in the Wake of Karamzin -- 3. Ambivalent Idylls: Time and Space in Accounts of Domestic Travel -- 4. Returning to Europe (1812-25) -- 1. Fyodor Glinka's Grandest Tour: Paris, 1814 -- 2. Movement and Authority: Batiushkov in Wartime France -- 3. Reaffirming the Grand Tour -- 5. Reimagining Foreign and Domestic Space (1810-50) -- 1. Vilgelm Kiukhelbeker's Revision of the Grand Tour -- 2. Gogol's Europe: Supplanting Western Tradition -- 3. Fyodor Glinka's: Internal Tour, 1810-11 -- 4. Pushkin's Provincial Tours: In the Tracks of Pugachov and Radishchev -- 5. Zhukovsky and Aleksandr Nikolaevich in Provincial Russia -- 6. In Conclusion: On Firm Ground -- Notes -- Works Cited -- Index of Names and Texts -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Z.
Summary: Breaking Ground examines travel writing's contribution to the development of a Russian national culture from roughly 1700 to 1850, as Russia struggled to define itself against Western Europe. Russian examples of literary travel writing began with imitative descriptions of grand tours abroad, but progressive familiarity with the West and with its literary forms gradually enabled writers to find other ways of describing the experiences of Russians en route. Blending foreign and native cultural influences, writers responded to the pressures of the age-to Catherine II, Napoleon, and Nicholas I, for example-both by turning "inward" to focus on domestic touring and by rewriting their relationship to the West. This book tracks the evolution of literary travel writing in this period of its unprecedented popularity and demonstrates how the expression of national identity, the discovery of a national culture, and conceptions of place-both Russian and Western European-were among its primary achievements. These elements also constitute travel writing's chief legacy to prose fiction, "breaking ground" for the later masterpieces of writers such as Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. For literary scholars, historians, and other educated readers with interests in Russian culture, travel writing, comparative literature, and national identity.
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Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Note on Transliteration and Citations -- Introduction -- The Literary Mode of Travel Writing -- Travel Writing and National Consciousness -- Travel Writing and Imaginary Geography -- 1. Fonvizin and the Russian Tour of Western Europe (1689-1789) -- 1. Petrine Tourism: The Diary of Boris Kurakin -- 2. Educational Travel: The Voyage of Aleksandr Kurakin -- 3. The Literary Style of Ekaterina Dashkova -- 4. Fonvizin and France -- 5. Alternative Routes: Fonvizin's Later Letters and Spa Diaries -- 6. The Trajectory of a Freemason: Vasily Zinoviev -- 2. Radishchev and Domestic Description (1767-97) -- 1. Science and State in the Conception of Internal Travel Writing -- 2. Sentiment and Social Criticism -- 3. Radishchev and the Poetics of the National Landscape -- 4. Radishchev in Siberia: Letters and Diaries, 1790-97 -- 3. Karamzin and the Internal Account (1791-1812) -- 1. Karamzin's Traveler and Text -- 2. Sentimentalist Imitation and Parody in the Wake of Karamzin -- 3. Ambivalent Idylls: Time and Space in Accounts of Domestic Travel -- 4. Returning to Europe (1812-25) -- 1. Fyodor Glinka's Grandest Tour: Paris, 1814 -- 2. Movement and Authority: Batiushkov in Wartime France -- 3. Reaffirming the Grand Tour -- 5. Reimagining Foreign and Domestic Space (1810-50) -- 1. Vilgelm Kiukhelbeker's Revision of the Grand Tour -- 2. Gogol's Europe: Supplanting Western Tradition -- 3. Fyodor Glinka's: Internal Tour, 1810-11 -- 4. Pushkin's Provincial Tours: In the Tracks of Pugachov and Radishchev -- 5. Zhukovsky and Aleksandr Nikolaevich in Provincial Russia -- 6. In Conclusion: On Firm Ground -- Notes -- Works Cited -- Index of Names and Texts -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Z.

Breaking Ground examines travel writing's contribution to the development of a Russian national culture from roughly 1700 to 1850, as Russia struggled to define itself against Western Europe. Russian examples of literary travel writing began with imitative descriptions of grand tours abroad, but progressive familiarity with the West and with its literary forms gradually enabled writers to find other ways of describing the experiences of Russians en route. Blending foreign and native cultural influences, writers responded to the pressures of the age-to Catherine II, Napoleon, and Nicholas I, for example-both by turning "inward" to focus on domestic touring and by rewriting their relationship to the West. This book tracks the evolution of literary travel writing in this period of its unprecedented popularity and demonstrates how the expression of national identity, the discovery of a national culture, and conceptions of place-both Russian and Western European-were among its primary achievements. These elements also constitute travel writing's chief legacy to prose fiction, "breaking ground" for the later masterpieces of writers such as Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. For literary scholars, historians, and other educated readers with interests in Russian culture, travel writing, comparative literature, and national identity.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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