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The Mathematical Mechanic : Using Physical Reasoning to Solve Problems.

By: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2009Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (168 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781400830473
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Mathematical Mechanic : Using Physical Reasoning to Solve ProblemsDDC classification:
  • 510
LOC classification:
  • QA63.L48 2009
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Math versus Physics -- 1.2 What This Book Is About -- 1.3 A Physical versus a Mathematical Solution: An Example -- 1.4 Acknowledgments -- 2 The Pythagorean Theorem -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The "Fish Tank" Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem -- 2.3 Converting a Physical Argument into a Rigorous Proof -- 2.4 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus -- 2.5 The Determinant by Sweeping -- 2.6 The Pythagorean Theorem by Rotation -- 2.7 Still Water Runs Deep -- 2.8 A Three-Dimensional Pythagorean Theorem -- 2.9 A Surprising Equilibrium -- 2.10 Pythagorean Theorem by Springs -- 2.11 More Geometry with Springs -- 2.12 A Kinetic Energy Proof: Pythagoras on Ice -- 2.13 Pythagoras and Einstein? -- 3 Minima and Maxima -- 3.1 The Optical Property of Ellipses -- 3.2 More about the Optical Property -- 3.3 Linear Regression (The Best Fit) via Springs -- 3.4 The Polygon of Least Area -- 3.5 The Pyramid of Least Volume -- 3.6 A Theorem on Centroids -- 3.7 An Isoperimetric Problem -- 3.8 The Cheapest Can -- 3.9 The Cheapest Pot -- 3.10 The Best Spot in a Drive-In Theater -- 3.11 The Inscribed Angle -- 3.12 Fermat's Principle and Snell's Law -- 3.13 Saving a Drowning Victim by Fermat's Principle -- 3.14 The Least Sum of Squares to a Point -- 3.15 Why Does a Triangle Balance on the Point of Intersection of the Medians? -- 3.16 The Least Sum of Distances to Four Points in Space -- 3.17 Shortest Distance to the Sides of an Angle -- 3.18 The Shortest Segment through a Point -- 3.19 Maneuvering a Ladder -- 3.20 The Most Capacious Paper Cup -- 3.21 Minimal-Perimeter Triangles -- 3.22 An Ellipse in the Corner -- 3.23 Problems -- 4 Inequalities by Electric Shorting -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The Arithmetic Mean Is Greater than the Geometric Mean by Throwing a Switch -- 4.3 Arithmetic Mean ≥ Harmonic Mean for n Numbers.
4.4 Does Any Short Decrease Resistance? -- 4.5 Problems -- 5 Center of Mass: Proofs and Solutions -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Center of Mass of a Semicircle by Conservation of Energy -- 5.3 Center of Mass of a Half-Disk (Half-Pizza) -- 5.4 Center of Mass of a Hanging Chain -- 5.5 Pappus's Centroid Theorems -- 5.6 Ceva's Theorem -- 5.7 Three Applications of Ceva's Theorem -- 5.8 Problems -- 6 Geometry and Motion -- 6.1 Area between the Tracks of a Bike -- 6.2 An Equal-Volumes Theorem -- 6.3 How Much Gold Is in a Wedding Ring? -- 6.4 The Fastest Descent -- 6.5 Finding sin t and cos t by Rotation -- 6.6 Problems -- 7 Computing Integrals Using Mechanics -- 7.1 Computing by Lifting a Weight -- 7.2 Computing sin tdt with a Pendulum -- 7.3 A Fluid Proof of Green's Theorem -- 8 The Euler-Lagrange Equation via Stretched Springs -- 8.1 Some Background on the Euler-Lagrange Equation -- 8.2 A Mechanical Interpretation of the Euler-Lagrange Equation -- 8.3 A Derivation of the Euler-Lagrange Equation -- 8.4 Energy Conservation by Sliding a Spring -- 9 Lenses, Telescopes, and Hamiltonian Mechanics -- 9.1 Area-Preserving Mappings of the Plane: Examples -- 9.2 Mechanics and Maps -- 9.3 A (Literally!) Hand-Waving "Proof" of Area Preservation -- 9.4 The Generating Function -- 9.5 A Table of Analogies between Mechanics and Analysis -- 9.6 "The Uncertainty Principle" -- 9.7 Area Preservation in Optics -- 9.8 Telescopes and Area Preservation -- 9.9 Problems -- 10 A Bicycle Wheel and the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The Dual-Cones Theorem -- 10.3 The Gauss-Bonnet Formula Formulation and Background -- 10.4 The Gauss-Bonnet Formula by Mechanics -- 10.5 A Bicycle Wheel and the Dual Cones -- 10.6 The Area of a Country -- 11 Complex Variables Made Simple(r) -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 How a Complex Number Could Have Been Invented.
11.3 Functions as Ideal Fluid Flows -- 11.4 A Physical Meaning of the Complex Integral -- 11.5 The Cauchy Integral Formula via Fluid Flow -- 11.6 Heat Flow and Analytic Functions -- 11.7 Riemann Mapping by Heat Flow -- 11.8 Euler's Sum via Fluid Flow -- Appendix. Physical Background -- A.1 Springs -- A.2 Soap Films -- A.3 Compressed Gas -- A.4 Vacuum -- A.5 Torque -- A.6 The Equilibrium of a Rigid Body -- A.7 Angular Momentum -- A.8 The Center of Mass -- A.9 The Moment of Inertia -- A.10 Current -- A.11 Voltage -- A.12 Kirchhoff's Laws -- A.13 Resistance and Ohm's Law -- A.14 Resistors in Parallel -- A.15 Resistors in Series -- A.16 Power Dissipated in a Resistor -- A.17 Capacitors and Capacitance -- A.18 The Inductance: Inertia of the Current -- A.19 An Electrical-Plumbing Analogy -- A.20 Problems -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- I -- L -- M -- P -- R -- S -- T -- V -- W.
Summary: Everybody knows that mathematics is indispensable to physics--imagine where we'd be today if Einstein and Newton didn't have the math to back up their ideas. But how many people realize that physics can be used to produce many astonishing and strikingly elegant solutions in mathematics? Mark Levi shows how in this delightful book, treating readers to a host of entertaining problems and mind-bending puzzlers that will amuse and inspire their inner physicist. Levi turns math and physics upside down, revealing how physics can simplify proofs and lead to quicker solutions and new theorems, and how physical solutions can illustrate why results are true in ways lengthy mathematical calculations never can. Did you know it's possible to derive the Pythagorean theorem by spinning a fish tank filled with water? Or that soap film holds the key to determining the cheapest container for a given volume? Or that the line of best fit for a data set can be found using a mechanical contraption made from a rod and springs? Levi demonstrates how to use physical intuition to solve these and other fascinating math problems. More than half the problems can be tackled by anyone with precalculus and basic geometry, while the more challenging problems require some calculus. This one-of-a-kind book explains physics and math concepts where needed, and includes an informative appendix of physical principles. The Mathematical Mechanic will appeal to anyone interested in the little-known connections between mathematics and physics and how both endeavors relate to the world around us.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00036557
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00036557
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Cover -- Contents -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Math versus Physics -- 1.2 What This Book Is About -- 1.3 A Physical versus a Mathematical Solution: An Example -- 1.4 Acknowledgments -- 2 The Pythagorean Theorem -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The "Fish Tank" Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem -- 2.3 Converting a Physical Argument into a Rigorous Proof -- 2.4 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus -- 2.5 The Determinant by Sweeping -- 2.6 The Pythagorean Theorem by Rotation -- 2.7 Still Water Runs Deep -- 2.8 A Three-Dimensional Pythagorean Theorem -- 2.9 A Surprising Equilibrium -- 2.10 Pythagorean Theorem by Springs -- 2.11 More Geometry with Springs -- 2.12 A Kinetic Energy Proof: Pythagoras on Ice -- 2.13 Pythagoras and Einstein? -- 3 Minima and Maxima -- 3.1 The Optical Property of Ellipses -- 3.2 More about the Optical Property -- 3.3 Linear Regression (The Best Fit) via Springs -- 3.4 The Polygon of Least Area -- 3.5 The Pyramid of Least Volume -- 3.6 A Theorem on Centroids -- 3.7 An Isoperimetric Problem -- 3.8 The Cheapest Can -- 3.9 The Cheapest Pot -- 3.10 The Best Spot in a Drive-In Theater -- 3.11 The Inscribed Angle -- 3.12 Fermat's Principle and Snell's Law -- 3.13 Saving a Drowning Victim by Fermat's Principle -- 3.14 The Least Sum of Squares to a Point -- 3.15 Why Does a Triangle Balance on the Point of Intersection of the Medians? -- 3.16 The Least Sum of Distances to Four Points in Space -- 3.17 Shortest Distance to the Sides of an Angle -- 3.18 The Shortest Segment through a Point -- 3.19 Maneuvering a Ladder -- 3.20 The Most Capacious Paper Cup -- 3.21 Minimal-Perimeter Triangles -- 3.22 An Ellipse in the Corner -- 3.23 Problems -- 4 Inequalities by Electric Shorting -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The Arithmetic Mean Is Greater than the Geometric Mean by Throwing a Switch -- 4.3 Arithmetic Mean ≥ Harmonic Mean for n Numbers.

4.4 Does Any Short Decrease Resistance? -- 4.5 Problems -- 5 Center of Mass: Proofs and Solutions -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Center of Mass of a Semicircle by Conservation of Energy -- 5.3 Center of Mass of a Half-Disk (Half-Pizza) -- 5.4 Center of Mass of a Hanging Chain -- 5.5 Pappus's Centroid Theorems -- 5.6 Ceva's Theorem -- 5.7 Three Applications of Ceva's Theorem -- 5.8 Problems -- 6 Geometry and Motion -- 6.1 Area between the Tracks of a Bike -- 6.2 An Equal-Volumes Theorem -- 6.3 How Much Gold Is in a Wedding Ring? -- 6.4 The Fastest Descent -- 6.5 Finding sin t and cos t by Rotation -- 6.6 Problems -- 7 Computing Integrals Using Mechanics -- 7.1 Computing by Lifting a Weight -- 7.2 Computing sin tdt with a Pendulum -- 7.3 A Fluid Proof of Green's Theorem -- 8 The Euler-Lagrange Equation via Stretched Springs -- 8.1 Some Background on the Euler-Lagrange Equation -- 8.2 A Mechanical Interpretation of the Euler-Lagrange Equation -- 8.3 A Derivation of the Euler-Lagrange Equation -- 8.4 Energy Conservation by Sliding a Spring -- 9 Lenses, Telescopes, and Hamiltonian Mechanics -- 9.1 Area-Preserving Mappings of the Plane: Examples -- 9.2 Mechanics and Maps -- 9.3 A (Literally!) Hand-Waving "Proof" of Area Preservation -- 9.4 The Generating Function -- 9.5 A Table of Analogies between Mechanics and Analysis -- 9.6 "The Uncertainty Principle" -- 9.7 Area Preservation in Optics -- 9.8 Telescopes and Area Preservation -- 9.9 Problems -- 10 A Bicycle Wheel and the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The Dual-Cones Theorem -- 10.3 The Gauss-Bonnet Formula Formulation and Background -- 10.4 The Gauss-Bonnet Formula by Mechanics -- 10.5 A Bicycle Wheel and the Dual Cones -- 10.6 The Area of a Country -- 11 Complex Variables Made Simple(r) -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 How a Complex Number Could Have Been Invented.

11.3 Functions as Ideal Fluid Flows -- 11.4 A Physical Meaning of the Complex Integral -- 11.5 The Cauchy Integral Formula via Fluid Flow -- 11.6 Heat Flow and Analytic Functions -- 11.7 Riemann Mapping by Heat Flow -- 11.8 Euler's Sum via Fluid Flow -- Appendix. Physical Background -- A.1 Springs -- A.2 Soap Films -- A.3 Compressed Gas -- A.4 Vacuum -- A.5 Torque -- A.6 The Equilibrium of a Rigid Body -- A.7 Angular Momentum -- A.8 The Center of Mass -- A.9 The Moment of Inertia -- A.10 Current -- A.11 Voltage -- A.12 Kirchhoff's Laws -- A.13 Resistance and Ohm's Law -- A.14 Resistors in Parallel -- A.15 Resistors in Series -- A.16 Power Dissipated in a Resistor -- A.17 Capacitors and Capacitance -- A.18 The Inductance: Inertia of the Current -- A.19 An Electrical-Plumbing Analogy -- A.20 Problems -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- I -- L -- M -- P -- R -- S -- T -- V -- W.

Everybody knows that mathematics is indispensable to physics--imagine where we'd be today if Einstein and Newton didn't have the math to back up their ideas. But how many people realize that physics can be used to produce many astonishing and strikingly elegant solutions in mathematics? Mark Levi shows how in this delightful book, treating readers to a host of entertaining problems and mind-bending puzzlers that will amuse and inspire their inner physicist. Levi turns math and physics upside down, revealing how physics can simplify proofs and lead to quicker solutions and new theorems, and how physical solutions can illustrate why results are true in ways lengthy mathematical calculations never can. Did you know it's possible to derive the Pythagorean theorem by spinning a fish tank filled with water? Or that soap film holds the key to determining the cheapest container for a given volume? Or that the line of best fit for a data set can be found using a mechanical contraption made from a rod and springs? Levi demonstrates how to use physical intuition to solve these and other fascinating math problems. More than half the problems can be tackled by anyone with precalculus and basic geometry, while the more challenging problems require some calculus. This one-of-a-kind book explains physics and math concepts where needed, and includes an informative appendix of physical principles. The Mathematical Mechanic will appeal to anyone interested in the little-known connections between mathematics and physics and how both endeavors relate to the world around us.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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