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Drawing and Painting : Children and Visual Representation.

By: Series: Zero to EightPublisher: London : SAGE Publications, 2003Copyright date: ©2003Edition: 2nd edDescription: 1 online resource (226 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781412932868
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Drawing and Painting : Children and Visual RepresentationDDC classification:
  • 305.231
LOC classification:
  • 00210727
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover Page -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Series Preface -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 Painting in Action -- Some questions -- Visual representation and expression -- Drawing and language -- Scribbling and babbling -- The importance of other people -- Painting actions - varying the tempo and direction -- Dynamic patterns of action -- Representing shape and movement -- Painting as patterned dance in space and time -- Play -- Splattering paint -- Summary -- 2 Actions, Skills and Meaning -- Where do representations of movement and objects come from? -- Conversations with newborn babies -- An emotional space between caregiver and baby -- Analysis and discussion -- Babies and movement -- Vertical arc -- Horizontal arc -- Push-pull -- Reaching and grasping -- Horizontal arc and push-pull used in painting -- Summary -- 3 The Beginning of Painting and Drawing -- Three dimensions - objects and people -- Two dimensions -- First painting -- Realising that movements make marks -- Joel begins to draw and paint -- Reasons not causes -- Summary -- 4 Movement into Shape -- Separating and combining movement and shapes -- A family of shapes -- Drawing helps us see and understand -- Using colour: contrasts and links -- The importance of marks and the spaces between them -- Points in space -- Traditional drawing media and electronic paint -- Covering and hiding -- Closed shape -- Putting shapes together, taking them apart and putting them together again -- Making connections: joining things together -- Combining movements and marks: travelling zigzags, waves and travelling loops -- Different movements have different results -- Combining different drawing actions -- Children need to practise and repeat what they know -- Going around, going up, going down and going through.
Round and round, going up, going down and going through -- Summary -- 5 Seeing and Knowing -- Linda in dungarees -- Different types of information -- Spilling milk while holding beans on toast: what things are, where things are, and how and where they go -- Views, sections and surfaces -- Summary -- 6 Space and Time -- Three-dimensional constructions: the relationship to two-dimensional work -- The ecology of creativity -- Showing more complex events in space and time -- Movement and time: changes of state and changes of position -- Sequences of events: visual narrative -- Children learn from other people's pictures -- Talking to children about how pictures work -- Many different pictures from a few drawing rules -- Education and childcare: what we can do to help -- Summary -- 7 The Origin of Literacy: Young Children Learn to Read -- B is Ben -- Starting to read and write -- Summary -- 8 Children Begin to Show Depth in their Drawings -- Looking from a particular point of view, or a variety of points of view -- Drawing a stagecoach that moves away from us -- The importance of understanding children's thinking -- Helping children get on with their drawings -- Occlusion and hidden line elimination -- Foreshortened planes -- Planes, curves and spheres -- Visual jokes: the relationship between humour and intellect -- Implications of Ben's development -- How does the study of Ben compare with studies of average drawing development? -- Autistic child artists -- Other gifted child artists -- Summary -- 9 Why Do Many Children Give Up Drawing and Painting? What Can We Do to Help? -- Did my children see me painting? -- Should one paint or draw for children? -- The importance of record-keeping -- Painting: the unfolding event -- Analysis -- Different kinds of realism -- Drawing as an interplay of forces rather than the representation of objects -- Summary.
References -- Index.
Summary: Praise for the First Edition: `This is a fascinating book that clearly demonstrates the importance of such early artwork. It is richly provided with relevant photographs and each phase of development is clearly explained … It really is a "must read" for anyone working with young children! - Montessori International, Vol. 10 No. 3 Autumn 2000 This book has been revised to reflect recent developments in early childhood education, in developmental psychology and in our understanding of children's development in the arts. The author shows how this new model of children's development in visual representation has important implications for education. This is a revised edition of Helping Children to Draw and Paint: Children and Visual Representation, originally published in 1994.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF00010694
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP00010694
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Cover Page -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Series Preface -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 Painting in Action -- Some questions -- Visual representation and expression -- Drawing and language -- Scribbling and babbling -- The importance of other people -- Painting actions - varying the tempo and direction -- Dynamic patterns of action -- Representing shape and movement -- Painting as patterned dance in space and time -- Play -- Splattering paint -- Summary -- 2 Actions, Skills and Meaning -- Where do representations of movement and objects come from? -- Conversations with newborn babies -- An emotional space between caregiver and baby -- Analysis and discussion -- Babies and movement -- Vertical arc -- Horizontal arc -- Push-pull -- Reaching and grasping -- Horizontal arc and push-pull used in painting -- Summary -- 3 The Beginning of Painting and Drawing -- Three dimensions - objects and people -- Two dimensions -- First painting -- Realising that movements make marks -- Joel begins to draw and paint -- Reasons not causes -- Summary -- 4 Movement into Shape -- Separating and combining movement and shapes -- A family of shapes -- Drawing helps us see and understand -- Using colour: contrasts and links -- The importance of marks and the spaces between them -- Points in space -- Traditional drawing media and electronic paint -- Covering and hiding -- Closed shape -- Putting shapes together, taking them apart and putting them together again -- Making connections: joining things together -- Combining movements and marks: travelling zigzags, waves and travelling loops -- Different movements have different results -- Combining different drawing actions -- Children need to practise and repeat what they know -- Going around, going up, going down and going through.

Round and round, going up, going down and going through -- Summary -- 5 Seeing and Knowing -- Linda in dungarees -- Different types of information -- Spilling milk while holding beans on toast: what things are, where things are, and how and where they go -- Views, sections and surfaces -- Summary -- 6 Space and Time -- Three-dimensional constructions: the relationship to two-dimensional work -- The ecology of creativity -- Showing more complex events in space and time -- Movement and time: changes of state and changes of position -- Sequences of events: visual narrative -- Children learn from other people's pictures -- Talking to children about how pictures work -- Many different pictures from a few drawing rules -- Education and childcare: what we can do to help -- Summary -- 7 The Origin of Literacy: Young Children Learn to Read -- B is Ben -- Starting to read and write -- Summary -- 8 Children Begin to Show Depth in their Drawings -- Looking from a particular point of view, or a variety of points of view -- Drawing a stagecoach that moves away from us -- The importance of understanding children's thinking -- Helping children get on with their drawings -- Occlusion and hidden line elimination -- Foreshortened planes -- Planes, curves and spheres -- Visual jokes: the relationship between humour and intellect -- Implications of Ben's development -- How does the study of Ben compare with studies of average drawing development? -- Autistic child artists -- Other gifted child artists -- Summary -- 9 Why Do Many Children Give Up Drawing and Painting? What Can We Do to Help? -- Did my children see me painting? -- Should one paint or draw for children? -- The importance of record-keeping -- Painting: the unfolding event -- Analysis -- Different kinds of realism -- Drawing as an interplay of forces rather than the representation of objects -- Summary.

References -- Index.

Praise for the First Edition: `This is a fascinating book that clearly demonstrates the importance of such early artwork. It is richly provided with relevant photographs and each phase of development is clearly explained … It really is a "must read" for anyone working with young children! - Montessori International, Vol. 10 No. 3 Autumn 2000 This book has been revised to reflect recent developments in early childhood education, in developmental psychology and in our understanding of children's development in the arts. The author shows how this new model of children's development in visual representation has important implications for education. This is a revised edition of Helping Children to Draw and Paint: Children and Visual Representation, originally published in 1994.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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