Against Liberation : Putting Animals in Perspective.

By: Leahy, Michael P.T
Publisher: London : Routledge, 1991Copyright date: ©1991Edition: 2nd edDescription: 1 online resource (297 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780203981238Subject(s): Animal welfare - Moral and ethical aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Against Liberation : Putting Animals in PerspectiveDDC classification: 179.3 LOC classification: HV4708 -- .L43 1994ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
BOOK COVER -- HALT-TITLE -- TITLE -- COPYRIGHT -- DEDICATION -- CONTENTS -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS -- HAWK ROOSTING -- INTRODUCTION -- The contemporary background -- Konrad Lorenz and choosing a dog -- In defence of Lorenz -- Anthropomorphism and the expert -- 1 THE UTILITARIAN BEGINNINGS -- Singer and utilitarianism -- The principle of equal consideration of interests -- Infants, permanently retarded humans, and John Rawls -- Are animals equal? -- Persons and non-persons -- Persons and animals -- Animals and pain -- Pain and problems -- Beyond pain to self-consciousness -- Animals and rationality -- From Skinner box to anecdote -- Rationality is not always what it seems -- Beyond mere rationality -- 2 R.G.FREY: THE CASE AGAINST ANIMALS -- The varieties of interest -- The scope of welfare interests -- Assessing Frey's distinction -- Animals, artifacts and plants -- Wants and belief: the background -- Beliefs, animals, and the importance of language -- Behaviour without beliefs -- Is believing behaving? -- 3 THREE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM TOM REGAN -- Introduction -- Conscious problems -- Finding fault with Frey: simple desires -- Finding fault: sentences -- Finding fault: deviant cases -- Further faults: pre-verbal beliefs? -- A Stich in time -- The amphiboly of tail-wagging -- Beyond utilitarianism: inherent value and Singer -- Inherent value as antidote -- 4 THE HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: ARISTOTLE TO DARWIN -- Introduction -- Aristotle (384-322 BC)1 -- St Thomas Aquinas (1225-74) -- Rene Descartes (1596-1650) -- Empiricist reactions: animals revived -- Charles Darwin (1809-82): scientific rigour and anecdotal optimism -- 5 LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN LANGUAGE-GAMES AND PRIMITIVE BEINGS -- Introduction -- No more than a mirror -- The craving for generality -- Language-games and forms of life -- A batlle against bewitchment.
The vacuity of naming -- Thinking about thinking -- 'But-they simply do not talk' -- The 'primitive forms' of communication -- Expectation and belief -- 'I assimilate psychological concepts' -- Sensations -- Pain and animals -- From sensations to emotions -- Remorse, hope, grief and compassion -- Anger and fear -- Postscript -- 'If a lion could talk…' -- 6 WHAT ANIMALS ARE: WHAT ANIMALS ARE: CONSCIOUSNESS, PERCEPTION, AUTONOMY, LANGUAGE -- Wittgenstein and the scientists -- Consciousness -- Self-consciousness -- Perception -- Autonomy: ends and means -- Language possibilities -- The status of animals: primitive beings -- 7 AGAINST LIBERATION: THE ETHICAL DIMENSION -- Common sense and moral theory -- The nature of choosing -- The pressures of the moral arena -- Moral choice and legal obligation -- The law: stability and animals -- Rawls revisited: moral agents and moral patients -- Indirect duties -- In defence of indirect duties -- The varieties of legal subject -- Moral rights as legal rights -- Moral rights in dispute -- Natural rights -- How animals should be treated -- Flights of fancy: the exaggerations of welfare -- Animals and imbeciles -- Infants and potentiality -- 8 CHAPTERS OF DISCONTENT: EATING, EXPERIMENTING, ZOOS, BLOODSPORTS -- INTRODUCTION -- Abuses and abolition -- KILLING FOR FOOD -- Vegetarianism as a test case -- Considerations of utility: human welfare -- Utility and western society -- The dark side of farming -- Defects of utilitarian abolition -- Slaughtering -- Conclusion -- EXPERIMENTATION -- Pain, suffering, distress, and anxiety -- Replaceable and rare subjects -- Vivisection in education -- Product testing and pharmaceuticals -- 'Pure' research -- Alternatives to animals -- ZOOS-FIELD SPORTS-FUR COATS-VIOLENCE -- Introduction -- A brief background to zoos -- Contemporary criticism: against zoos.
The 'moral presumption' against captivity -- Undermining the presumption -- Hunting, shooting, and fishing -- Hysteria and the fur trade -- A postscript on violence -- EPILOGUE -- AFTERWORD: A REPLY TO MY CRITICS -- OPENING SHOTS -- RICHARD RYDER AND MARY MIDGLEY -- STEPHEN CLARK -- PETER SINGER AND ANECDOTAL DEVELOPMENTS -- ETHICS AND PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS -- NOTES -- INTRODUCTION -- 1 THE UTILITARIAN BEGINNINGS -- 2 R.G.FREY: THE CASE AGAINST ANIMALS -- 3 THREE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM TOM REGAN -- 4 THE HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: ARISTOTLE TO DARWIN -- 5 LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN: LANGUAGE-GAMES AND PRIMITIVE BEINGS -- 6 WHAT ANIMALS ARE: CONSCIOUSNESS, PERCEPTION, AUTONOMY, LANGUAGE -- 7 AGAINST LIBERATION: THE ETHICAL DIMENSION -- 8 CHAPTERS OF DISCONTENT: EATING, EXPERIMENTING, ZOOS, BLOODSPORTS -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- INDEX.
Summary: The Western world is currently gripped by an obsessive concern for the rights of animals - their uses and abuses. In this book, Leahy argues that this is a movement based upon a series of fundamental misconceptions about the basic nature of animals. This is a radical philosophical questioning of prevailing views on animal rights, which credit animals with a self-consciousness like ours. Leahy's conclusions have implications for issues such as bloodsports, meat eating and fur trading.
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BOOK COVER -- HALT-TITLE -- TITLE -- COPYRIGHT -- DEDICATION -- CONTENTS -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS -- HAWK ROOSTING -- INTRODUCTION -- The contemporary background -- Konrad Lorenz and choosing a dog -- In defence of Lorenz -- Anthropomorphism and the expert -- 1 THE UTILITARIAN BEGINNINGS -- Singer and utilitarianism -- The principle of equal consideration of interests -- Infants, permanently retarded humans, and John Rawls -- Are animals equal? -- Persons and non-persons -- Persons and animals -- Animals and pain -- Pain and problems -- Beyond pain to self-consciousness -- Animals and rationality -- From Skinner box to anecdote -- Rationality is not always what it seems -- Beyond mere rationality -- 2 R.G.FREY: THE CASE AGAINST ANIMALS -- The varieties of interest -- The scope of welfare interests -- Assessing Frey's distinction -- Animals, artifacts and plants -- Wants and belief: the background -- Beliefs, animals, and the importance of language -- Behaviour without beliefs -- Is believing behaving? -- 3 THREE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM TOM REGAN -- Introduction -- Conscious problems -- Finding fault with Frey: simple desires -- Finding fault: sentences -- Finding fault: deviant cases -- Further faults: pre-verbal beliefs? -- A Stich in time -- The amphiboly of tail-wagging -- Beyond utilitarianism: inherent value and Singer -- Inherent value as antidote -- 4 THE HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: ARISTOTLE TO DARWIN -- Introduction -- Aristotle (384-322 BC)1 -- St Thomas Aquinas (1225-74) -- Rene Descartes (1596-1650) -- Empiricist reactions: animals revived -- Charles Darwin (1809-82): scientific rigour and anecdotal optimism -- 5 LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN LANGUAGE-GAMES AND PRIMITIVE BEINGS -- Introduction -- No more than a mirror -- The craving for generality -- Language-games and forms of life -- A batlle against bewitchment.

The vacuity of naming -- Thinking about thinking -- 'But-they simply do not talk' -- The 'primitive forms' of communication -- Expectation and belief -- 'I assimilate psychological concepts' -- Sensations -- Pain and animals -- From sensations to emotions -- Remorse, hope, grief and compassion -- Anger and fear -- Postscript -- 'If a lion could talk…' -- 6 WHAT ANIMALS ARE: WHAT ANIMALS ARE: CONSCIOUSNESS, PERCEPTION, AUTONOMY, LANGUAGE -- Wittgenstein and the scientists -- Consciousness -- Self-consciousness -- Perception -- Autonomy: ends and means -- Language possibilities -- The status of animals: primitive beings -- 7 AGAINST LIBERATION: THE ETHICAL DIMENSION -- Common sense and moral theory -- The nature of choosing -- The pressures of the moral arena -- Moral choice and legal obligation -- The law: stability and animals -- Rawls revisited: moral agents and moral patients -- Indirect duties -- In defence of indirect duties -- The varieties of legal subject -- Moral rights as legal rights -- Moral rights in dispute -- Natural rights -- How animals should be treated -- Flights of fancy: the exaggerations of welfare -- Animals and imbeciles -- Infants and potentiality -- 8 CHAPTERS OF DISCONTENT: EATING, EXPERIMENTING, ZOOS, BLOODSPORTS -- INTRODUCTION -- Abuses and abolition -- KILLING FOR FOOD -- Vegetarianism as a test case -- Considerations of utility: human welfare -- Utility and western society -- The dark side of farming -- Defects of utilitarian abolition -- Slaughtering -- Conclusion -- EXPERIMENTATION -- Pain, suffering, distress, and anxiety -- Replaceable and rare subjects -- Vivisection in education -- Product testing and pharmaceuticals -- 'Pure' research -- Alternatives to animals -- ZOOS-FIELD SPORTS-FUR COATS-VIOLENCE -- Introduction -- A brief background to zoos -- Contemporary criticism: against zoos.

The 'moral presumption' against captivity -- Undermining the presumption -- Hunting, shooting, and fishing -- Hysteria and the fur trade -- A postscript on violence -- EPILOGUE -- AFTERWORD: A REPLY TO MY CRITICS -- OPENING SHOTS -- RICHARD RYDER AND MARY MIDGLEY -- STEPHEN CLARK -- PETER SINGER AND ANECDOTAL DEVELOPMENTS -- ETHICS AND PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS -- NOTES -- INTRODUCTION -- 1 THE UTILITARIAN BEGINNINGS -- 2 R.G.FREY: THE CASE AGAINST ANIMALS -- 3 THREE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM TOM REGAN -- 4 THE HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: ARISTOTLE TO DARWIN -- 5 LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN: LANGUAGE-GAMES AND PRIMITIVE BEINGS -- 6 WHAT ANIMALS ARE: CONSCIOUSNESS, PERCEPTION, AUTONOMY, LANGUAGE -- 7 AGAINST LIBERATION: THE ETHICAL DIMENSION -- 8 CHAPTERS OF DISCONTENT: EATING, EXPERIMENTING, ZOOS, BLOODSPORTS -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- INDEX.

The Western world is currently gripped by an obsessive concern for the rights of animals - their uses and abuses. In this book, Leahy argues that this is a movement based upon a series of fundamental misconceptions about the basic nature of animals. This is a radical philosophical questioning of prevailing views on animal rights, which credit animals with a self-consciousness like ours. Leahy's conclusions have implications for issues such as bloodsports, meat eating and fur trading.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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