Modality and Structure in Signed and Spoken Languages.

By: Meier, Richard PContributor(s): Cormier, Kearsy | Quinto-Pozos, DavidPublisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2002Copyright date: ©2002Description: 1 online resource (500 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780511148590Subject(s): Sign language--CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Modality and Structure in Signed and Spoken LanguagesDDC classification: 419 LOC classification: P117 .T4 2000Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- 1 Why different, why the same? Explaining effects and non-effects of modality upon linguistic structure in sign and speech -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 What's the same? -- 1.3 Why is it timely to revisit the issue of modality effects on linguistic structure? -- 1.4 Why might signed and spoken languages differ? -- 1.4.1 The articulators -- 1.4.2 The sensory or perceptual systems -- 1.4.3 The potential of the visual-gestural modality for iconic representation and for indexic/ostensive identification of… -- 1.4.4 The youth of sign languages and their roots in nonlinguistic gesture -- 1.5 What are possible linguistic outcomes of these modality differences? What, if anything, differs between signed and… -- 1.5.1 Not much -- 1.5.2 Statistical tendencies -- 1.5.3 Preferred typological properties differ between signed and spoken languages -- 1.5.4 Rules or typological patterns that are unique to signed or spoken languages -- 1.5.5 Relative uniformity of signed languages vs. relative diversity of spoken languages -- 1.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 1.7 References -- Part I Phonological structure in signed languages -- References -- 2 Modality differences in sign language phonology and morphophonemics -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Bases for differences in signed and spoken languages -- 2.2.1 Some key differences between vision and audition -- 2.2.2 Introduction to sign language phonology and to the Prosodic Model -- 2.3 The distribution of "consonant" and "vowel" information -- 2.3.1 Consonants and vowels in sign languages -- 2.3.2 Sensitivity to movemen-internal components -- 2.4 Differences concerning segments -- 2.4.1 Segments: Predictable, yet required by the grammar -- 2.4.2 Root nodes and timing slots -- 2.5 Differences at the lexical level.
2.5.1 Word shape -- 2.5.2 Minimal pairs -- 2.6 What comprises a modality-independent phonology? -- Acknowledgments -- 2.7 References -- 3 Beads on a string? Representations of repetition in spoken and signed languages -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Number of repetitions in words and signs -- 3.3 Rhythmic and irregular repetition in words and signs -- 3.4 Representing the data: Multiseg and Oneseg -- 3.4.1 Challenges to Oneseg -- 3.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 3.6 References -- 4 Psycholinguistic investigations of phonological structure in ASL -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Experiment 1: Phonological form-based priming -- 4.2.1 Method -- 4.2.2 Results -- 4.2.3 Discussion -- 4.3 Experiment 2: Phoneme monitoring -- 4.3.1 Method -- 4.3.2 Results -- 4.3.3 Discussion -- 4.4 Experiment 3: Sign picture naming -- 4.4.1 Method -- 4.4.2 Results -- 4.4.3 Discussion -- 4.5 Experiment 4: Phonological similarity -- 4.5.1 Method -- 4.5.2 Results -- 4.5.3 Discussion -- 4.6 General discussion -- Acknowledgments -- 4.7 References -- 5 Modality-dependent aspects of sign language production: Evidence from slips of the hands and their repairs in German… -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Goals and hypotheses -- 5.3 A serial model of language production -- 5.4 Method: Elicitation of slips of the hand -- 5.5 Results -- 5.5.1 Distribution of slip categories and affected entities -- 5.5.2 Selection of original slips of the hand -- 5.5.3 Intra-modal and inter-modal comparison with other slip corpora -- 5.6 The sign language monitor: Repair behavior in DGS -- 5.6.1 Locus of repair: Signed vs. spoken language -- 5.7 Summary and conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 5.8 References -- 6 The role of Manually Coded English in language development of deaf children -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Language planning and deaf children -- 6.3 An evaluation of Manually Coded English.
6.3.1 Structural properties -- 6.3.2 Nonlinear affixation -- 6.3.3 Linear affixation -- 6.3.4 MCE acquisition -- 6.4 Discussion and conclusions -- 6.5 References -- Part II Gesture and iconicity in sign and speech -- References -- 7 A modality-free notion of gesture and how it can help us with the morpheme vs. gesture question in sign language… -- 7.1 Liddell's proposal that there are gestures in agreement verbs -- 7.2 Objections to the proposal -- 7.3 The morpheme vs. gesture question -- 7.3.1 What is a morpheme? -- 7.3.2 What is a gesture? -- 7.4 Spoken gesture -- 7.5 The criteria -- 7.5.1 The determination of conventionalization is a problem -- 7.5.2 The determination of the site of conventionalization is important -- 7.5.3 Restrictions on the combination of the gestural and the linguistic -- 7.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 8 Gesture as the substrate in the process of ASL grammaticization -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Markers of modality -- 8.2.1 FUTURE -- 8.2.2 CAN -- 8.2.3 MUST -- 8.3 The grammaticization of topic -- 8.3.1 The communicative questioning gesture -- 8.3.2 Yes-no questions -- 8.3.3 From yes-no questions to topic marking -- 8.3.4 Textual domain topics: A further grammaticization step -- 8.4 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 8.5 References -- 9 A crosslinguistic examination of the lexicons of four signed languages -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Methodology -- 9.3 Results -- 9.4 Discussion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part III Syntax in sign: Few or no effects of modality -- References -- 10 Where are all the modality effects? -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The autonomy of syntax -- 10.2.1 Autonomy and signed languages -- 10.3 "Spatial syntax" -- 10.3.1 The use of space in pronouns and verb agreement -- 10.4 Is space really syntax? -- 10.4.1 The traditional view -- 10.4.2 The problem.
10.4.3 Why there is verb agreement in ASL -- 10.5 An alternative analysis employing agreement -- 10.5.1 Predictions of this account -- 10.6 Other alternatives -- 10.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 10.8 References -- 11 Applying morphosyntactic and phonological readjustment rules in natural language negation -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Distributed morphology -- 11.3 The derivation of negated sentences -- 11.3.1 French -- 11.3.2 Háusá -- 11.3.3 Gã (Gan) -- 11.3.4 German Sign Language (DGS) -- 11.3.5 Motivating split negation in DGS: A comparison with ASL -- 11.4 More languages, more readjustments -- 11.5 Discussion: What about modality effects? -- 11.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 11.7 References -- 12 Nominal expressions in Hong Kong Sign Language: Does modality make a difference? -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Nominal expressions of HKSL -- 12.3 Determiners -- 12.3.1 Definite determiners -- 12.3.2 Indefinite determiners -- 12.4 Pronouns -- 12.5 Possessives -- 12.6 Predominance of bare nouns: An indication of modality effects? -- 12.7 Mental spaces and nominal expressions: Toward an explanation -- 12.7.1 Bare nouns -- 12.7.2 Determiners -- 12.7.3 Pronouns -- 12.7.4 Possessives -- 12.8 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 12.9 References -- Part IV Using space and describing space: Pronouns, classifiers, and verb agreement -- References -- 13 Pronominal reference in signed and spoken language: Are grammatical categories modality-dependent? -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Pronominal systems across signed and spoken languages -- 13.2.1 Typological variation in spoken language pronominal systems -- 13.2.2 Typological variation in signed language pronominal systems -- 13.3 Pronominal reference in signed languages: Typological considerations -- 13.3.1 Typological homogeneity -- 13.3.2 Morphophonological exclusivity -- 13.3.3 Morphological paradigm.
13.3.4 Referential specificity -- 13.4 Spatial marking in pronominal systems -- 13.4.1 Spatial marking in spoken language pronominal systems -- 13.4.2 Spatial marking: Spoken and signed languages compared -- 13.5 The modality/medium distinction -- 13.6 Sign language pronouns revisited -- 13.6.1 Number marking in signed language pronominal systems -- 13.6.2 Person marking in sign language pronominal systems -- 13.6.3 Gender marking in signed languages -- 13.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 13.8 References -- 14 Is verb agreement the same crossmodally? -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 A working definition of verb agreement -- 14.3 Literature review on verb agreement in signed language(s) -- 14.3.1 Classic view -- 14.3.2 Simultaneity view -- 14.3.3 Sequentiality/simultaneity view -- 14.3.4 R-locus view -- 14.3.5 Liddell's view -- 14.4 On the linguistic nature of verb agreement in signed languages -- 14.4.1 Infinity issue = listability issue -- 14.4.2 The representation of linguistic information in verb agreement -- 14.5 Reconciling the linguistic nature of verb agreement with the listability issue -- 14.6 Modality differences in the application of the architecture of grammar to verb agreement: A proposal -- 14.6.1 Adapting an architecture of grammar -- 14.6.2 Modality differences in the use of the gestural space -- 14.6.3 Phonetic gaps in verb agreement -- 14.7 Modality effects: Morphological processes for verb agreement -- 14.7.1 Spoken languages -- 14.7.2 Signed languages -- 14.7.3 Implications -- 14.7.4 Recreolization -- 14.8 Summary -- Acknowledgments -- 14.9 References -- 15 The effects of modality on spatial language: How signers and speakers talk about space -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Modality effects and the nature of addressee vs. speaker perspective in spatial descriptions -- 15.3 Spatial formats and route vs. survey perspective choice.
15.4 How speakers and addressees interpret signing space: Reversed space, mirrored space, and shared space.
Summary: Signed languages are the visual-gestural languages of deaf communities. This book investigates their linguistic properties.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan
Available EBKAF0005833
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal
Available EBKNP0005833
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan

Access a wide range of magazines and books using Pressreader and Ebook central.

Enjoy your reading, British Council Sudan.

Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia
Available
Total holds: 0

Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- 1 Why different, why the same? Explaining effects and non-effects of modality upon linguistic structure in sign and speech -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 What's the same? -- 1.3 Why is it timely to revisit the issue of modality effects on linguistic structure? -- 1.4 Why might signed and spoken languages differ? -- 1.4.1 The articulators -- 1.4.2 The sensory or perceptual systems -- 1.4.3 The potential of the visual-gestural modality for iconic representation and for indexic/ostensive identification of… -- 1.4.4 The youth of sign languages and their roots in nonlinguistic gesture -- 1.5 What are possible linguistic outcomes of these modality differences? What, if anything, differs between signed and… -- 1.5.1 Not much -- 1.5.2 Statistical tendencies -- 1.5.3 Preferred typological properties differ between signed and spoken languages -- 1.5.4 Rules or typological patterns that are unique to signed or spoken languages -- 1.5.5 Relative uniformity of signed languages vs. relative diversity of spoken languages -- 1.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 1.7 References -- Part I Phonological structure in signed languages -- References -- 2 Modality differences in sign language phonology and morphophonemics -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Bases for differences in signed and spoken languages -- 2.2.1 Some key differences between vision and audition -- 2.2.2 Introduction to sign language phonology and to the Prosodic Model -- 2.3 The distribution of "consonant" and "vowel" information -- 2.3.1 Consonants and vowels in sign languages -- 2.3.2 Sensitivity to movemen-internal components -- 2.4 Differences concerning segments -- 2.4.1 Segments: Predictable, yet required by the grammar -- 2.4.2 Root nodes and timing slots -- 2.5 Differences at the lexical level.

2.5.1 Word shape -- 2.5.2 Minimal pairs -- 2.6 What comprises a modality-independent phonology? -- Acknowledgments -- 2.7 References -- 3 Beads on a string? Representations of repetition in spoken and signed languages -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Number of repetitions in words and signs -- 3.3 Rhythmic and irregular repetition in words and signs -- 3.4 Representing the data: Multiseg and Oneseg -- 3.4.1 Challenges to Oneseg -- 3.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 3.6 References -- 4 Psycholinguistic investigations of phonological structure in ASL -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Experiment 1: Phonological form-based priming -- 4.2.1 Method -- 4.2.2 Results -- 4.2.3 Discussion -- 4.3 Experiment 2: Phoneme monitoring -- 4.3.1 Method -- 4.3.2 Results -- 4.3.3 Discussion -- 4.4 Experiment 3: Sign picture naming -- 4.4.1 Method -- 4.4.2 Results -- 4.4.3 Discussion -- 4.5 Experiment 4: Phonological similarity -- 4.5.1 Method -- 4.5.2 Results -- 4.5.3 Discussion -- 4.6 General discussion -- Acknowledgments -- 4.7 References -- 5 Modality-dependent aspects of sign language production: Evidence from slips of the hands and their repairs in German… -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Goals and hypotheses -- 5.3 A serial model of language production -- 5.4 Method: Elicitation of slips of the hand -- 5.5 Results -- 5.5.1 Distribution of slip categories and affected entities -- 5.5.2 Selection of original slips of the hand -- 5.5.3 Intra-modal and inter-modal comparison with other slip corpora -- 5.6 The sign language monitor: Repair behavior in DGS -- 5.6.1 Locus of repair: Signed vs. spoken language -- 5.7 Summary and conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 5.8 References -- 6 The role of Manually Coded English in language development of deaf children -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Language planning and deaf children -- 6.3 An evaluation of Manually Coded English.

6.3.1 Structural properties -- 6.3.2 Nonlinear affixation -- 6.3.3 Linear affixation -- 6.3.4 MCE acquisition -- 6.4 Discussion and conclusions -- 6.5 References -- Part II Gesture and iconicity in sign and speech -- References -- 7 A modality-free notion of gesture and how it can help us with the morpheme vs. gesture question in sign language… -- 7.1 Liddell's proposal that there are gestures in agreement verbs -- 7.2 Objections to the proposal -- 7.3 The morpheme vs. gesture question -- 7.3.1 What is a morpheme? -- 7.3.2 What is a gesture? -- 7.4 Spoken gesture -- 7.5 The criteria -- 7.5.1 The determination of conventionalization is a problem -- 7.5.2 The determination of the site of conventionalization is important -- 7.5.3 Restrictions on the combination of the gestural and the linguistic -- 7.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 8 Gesture as the substrate in the process of ASL grammaticization -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Markers of modality -- 8.2.1 FUTURE -- 8.2.2 CAN -- 8.2.3 MUST -- 8.3 The grammaticization of topic -- 8.3.1 The communicative questioning gesture -- 8.3.2 Yes-no questions -- 8.3.3 From yes-no questions to topic marking -- 8.3.4 Textual domain topics: A further grammaticization step -- 8.4 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 8.5 References -- 9 A crosslinguistic examination of the lexicons of four signed languages -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Methodology -- 9.3 Results -- 9.4 Discussion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part III Syntax in sign: Few or no effects of modality -- References -- 10 Where are all the modality effects? -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 The autonomy of syntax -- 10.2.1 Autonomy and signed languages -- 10.3 "Spatial syntax" -- 10.3.1 The use of space in pronouns and verb agreement -- 10.4 Is space really syntax? -- 10.4.1 The traditional view -- 10.4.2 The problem.

10.4.3 Why there is verb agreement in ASL -- 10.5 An alternative analysis employing agreement -- 10.5.1 Predictions of this account -- 10.6 Other alternatives -- 10.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 10.8 References -- 11 Applying morphosyntactic and phonological readjustment rules in natural language negation -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Distributed morphology -- 11.3 The derivation of negated sentences -- 11.3.1 French -- 11.3.2 Háusá -- 11.3.3 Gã (Gan) -- 11.3.4 German Sign Language (DGS) -- 11.3.5 Motivating split negation in DGS: A comparison with ASL -- 11.4 More languages, more readjustments -- 11.5 Discussion: What about modality effects? -- 11.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 11.7 References -- 12 Nominal expressions in Hong Kong Sign Language: Does modality make a difference? -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Nominal expressions of HKSL -- 12.3 Determiners -- 12.3.1 Definite determiners -- 12.3.2 Indefinite determiners -- 12.4 Pronouns -- 12.5 Possessives -- 12.6 Predominance of bare nouns: An indication of modality effects? -- 12.7 Mental spaces and nominal expressions: Toward an explanation -- 12.7.1 Bare nouns -- 12.7.2 Determiners -- 12.7.3 Pronouns -- 12.7.4 Possessives -- 12.8 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- 12.9 References -- Part IV Using space and describing space: Pronouns, classifiers, and verb agreement -- References -- 13 Pronominal reference in signed and spoken language: Are grammatical categories modality-dependent? -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Pronominal systems across signed and spoken languages -- 13.2.1 Typological variation in spoken language pronominal systems -- 13.2.2 Typological variation in signed language pronominal systems -- 13.3 Pronominal reference in signed languages: Typological considerations -- 13.3.1 Typological homogeneity -- 13.3.2 Morphophonological exclusivity -- 13.3.3 Morphological paradigm.

13.3.4 Referential specificity -- 13.4 Spatial marking in pronominal systems -- 13.4.1 Spatial marking in spoken language pronominal systems -- 13.4.2 Spatial marking: Spoken and signed languages compared -- 13.5 The modality/medium distinction -- 13.6 Sign language pronouns revisited -- 13.6.1 Number marking in signed language pronominal systems -- 13.6.2 Person marking in sign language pronominal systems -- 13.6.3 Gender marking in signed languages -- 13.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- 13.8 References -- 14 Is verb agreement the same crossmodally? -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 A working definition of verb agreement -- 14.3 Literature review on verb agreement in signed language(s) -- 14.3.1 Classic view -- 14.3.2 Simultaneity view -- 14.3.3 Sequentiality/simultaneity view -- 14.3.4 R-locus view -- 14.3.5 Liddell's view -- 14.4 On the linguistic nature of verb agreement in signed languages -- 14.4.1 Infinity issue = listability issue -- 14.4.2 The representation of linguistic information in verb agreement -- 14.5 Reconciling the linguistic nature of verb agreement with the listability issue -- 14.6 Modality differences in the application of the architecture of grammar to verb agreement: A proposal -- 14.6.1 Adapting an architecture of grammar -- 14.6.2 Modality differences in the use of the gestural space -- 14.6.3 Phonetic gaps in verb agreement -- 14.7 Modality effects: Morphological processes for verb agreement -- 14.7.1 Spoken languages -- 14.7.2 Signed languages -- 14.7.3 Implications -- 14.7.4 Recreolization -- 14.8 Summary -- Acknowledgments -- 14.9 References -- 15 The effects of modality on spatial language: How signers and speakers talk about space -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Modality effects and the nature of addressee vs. speaker perspective in spatial descriptions -- 15.3 Spatial formats and route vs. survey perspective choice.

15.4 How speakers and addressees interpret signing space: Reversed space, mirrored space, and shared space.

Signed languages are the visual-gestural languages of deaf communities. This book investigates their linguistic properties.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.