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Class Counts Student Edition.

By: Series: Studies in Marxism and Social TheoryPublisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2000Copyright date: ©2000Description: 1 online resource (311 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9780511151781
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Class Counts Student EditionDDC classification:
  • 305.5
LOC classification:
  • HT609 .W699 2000
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface to student edition -- Preface to original edition -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Class analysis -- 1.1 The parable of the shmoo -- 1.2 The concept of exploitation -- 1.3 Class and exploitation -- 1.4 Adding complexities to the concept of class structure -- 1 The problem of the "middle class'' among employees -- Authority -- Skills and expertise -- A map of middle-class class locations -- 2 People not in the paid labor force -- 3 Employee investments -- 4 Temporality -- 1.5 Marxist versus Weberian class analysis -- 1.6 The empirical agenda of the book -- Class structure -- Class and gender -- Class structure and class consciousness -- Part I Structural analyses of classes -- 2. Class structure -- 2.1 The basic contours of the class structure -- The property dimension -- Employees -- 2.2 Class and gender -- 2.3 Class and race -- 2.4 Class structure: a summing up -- 3. The transformation of the American class structure, 1960-1990 -- 3.1 Contrasting expectations of post-industrial and Marxist theory -- 3.2 Methodological strategy -- 3.3 Results -- Refined sectoral analysis -- 3.4 Interpretations and implications -- 4. The fall and rise of the American petty bourgeoisie -- 4.1 Self-employment and economic stagnation -- 4.2 Sectoral decomposition of changes in self-employment -- 4.3 Conclusions and unresolved issues -- 5. The permeability of class boundaries -- 5.1 Theoretical issues -- Permeability in the Marxist and Weberian traditions -- Static and dynamic permeability -- 5.2 Methodological strategy -- Operationalizing class structure -- The permeability-event matrix -- Alternative approaches to analyzing permeability -- How to read the results -- 5.3 Intergenerational class mobility -- Theoretical expectations -- The relative permeability of class boundaries.
Cross-national variations -- Hypotheses -- A note on gender and class boundary permeability to mobility -- Results -- The relative permeability of class boundaries -- Mobility across the working-class boundary -- Cross-national variations -- Conclusions for mobility analyses -- 5.4 Cross-class friendships -- Orienting hypotheses -- Class interests (Marxian variant) -- Class interests (Dahrendorf variant) -- Class habitus (Bourdieu) -- Interaction opportunity -- Results -- The relative permeability of the three exploitation boundaries -- Friendship ties between the working class and other class locations -- Variations across countries in permeability to friendships -- Conclusion for the friendship analysis -- 5.5 Cross-class families -- Results -- Patterns of cross-class families -- The relative permeability of the three class boundaries -- The locational permeability of boundaries between working-class and other class locations -- Country interactions -- 5.6 Comparing the three forms of class-boundary permeability -- Part II Class and gender -- 6. Conceptualizing the interaction of class and gender -- 6.1 The debate over class primacy -- 6.2 Forms of interconnection of class and gender -- 1 Gender as a form of class relations -- 2 Gender relations and class relations as reciprocally affecting each other -- 3 Gender as a sorting mechanism into class locations -- 4 Gender as mediated linkage to class location -- 5 Gender as a causal interaction with class in determining outcomes -- 7. Individuals, families and class analysis -- 7.1 The debate on women and class -- 7.2 An alternative approach: direct and mediated class locations -- 7.3 A strategy for studying the effects of direct and mediated class locations -- Hypotheses -- Goldthorpe hypotheses -- Mediated and direct class locations hypotheses -- 7.4 Results -- 7.4 Implications -- 7.5 Conclusion.
8. The noneffects of class on the gendered division of labor in the home -- 8.1 Theoretical expectations -- Proletarianization and gender equality -- Sexism and class cultures -- Class and power within the family -- Autonomy of gender relations -- 8.2 Results -- Husband's housework contributions: descriptive results -- Variations in husband's housework across class location -- 8.3 Implications -- 9. The gender gap in workplace authority -- 9.1 Analytical strategy for studying the "gender gap'' -- 9.2 Empirical agenda -- Authority variables -- Analyzing the net gender gap in having authority within countries -- 1. Compositional factors -- 2. Self-selection because of family responsibilities -- The glass-ceiling hypothesis -- Explaining cross-national variations -- 1. Gender ideology -- 2. Women's reproductive and sexual rights -- 3. Gender earnings gap -- 4. Occupational sex segregation -- 5. The proportion of the labor force with authority -- 6. The organized women's movement and political culture -- 9.3 Results -- The gross gender grap in authority -- Net gender differences in authority with compositional controls -- Self-selection models -- The glass-ceiling hypothesis -- Explaining cross-national variations -- 1. Gender ideology -- 2. Sexual and reproductive rights -- 3. Gender earnings gap -- 4. Occupational sex segregation -- 5. The proportion of the labor force with authority -- 6. The organized women's movement and political culture -- 9.4 Conclusions -- Part III Class structure and class consciousness -- 10. A general framework for studying class consciousness and class formation -- 10.1 Micro- and macro-levels of analysis -- 10.2 Basic concepts -- Class structure and class location -- Class formation -- Class practices -- Class struggle -- Class consciousness -- 1. Perceptions and observations -- 2. Theories of Consequences -- 3. Preferences.
Limitation, selection and transformation -- 10.3 The micro-model -- 1. Class locations -limits… -- 2. Class locations -limits… -- 3. Class consciousness -selects… -- 4. Individual class practices -transforms… -- 5. Individual class practices -transforms… -- 10.4 The macro-model -- 1. Class structure -limits… -- 2. Class structure -limits… -- 3. Class formation -selects… -- 4. Class struggles -transforms… -- 5. Class struggles -transforms… -- 10.5 Putting the micro- and macro-models together -- 10.6 Using the models in empirical research -- 11. Class structure, class consciousness and class formation in Sweden, the United States and Japan -- 11.1 Measuring class consciousness -- 11.2 The empirical agenda -- Class locations and class consciousness -- Class formation -- Class consciousness -- 11.3 Results: the overall relationship between locations in the class structure and class consciousness -- 11.4 Results: the macro-analysis of class formation -- Sweden -- The United States -- Japan -- Summary of the comparisons of the three countries -- 11.5 Explaining the differences in class formations -- State employment -- Unionization -- Japan -- 11.5 The micro-analysis of class consciousness -- Additive country effects -- Cross-national comparisons of micro-equations -- 11.6 A brief note on class, race, gender and consciousness -- 11.7 Conclusion -- Part IV Conclusion -- 12. Confirmations, surprises and theoretical reconstructions -- 12.1 Conceptualizing "locations'' in the class structure -- Traditional understanding -- Initial reconstruction -- Empirical confirmations -- Surprises -- Further possible reconstructions? -- 12.2 Class structure and its variations in advanced capitalist societies -- Traditional understanding -- Confirmations -- Surprises -- Reconstructions -- 12.3 Individual lives and the class structure -- Traditional understanding.
Confirmations -- Surprises -- Reconstructions -- 12.4 Effects of class structure: class consciousness and class formation -- Traditional understanding -- Confirmations -- Surprises: direct and mediated class locations -- Surprises: class consciousness and class formation -- Reconstructions: direct and mediated class locations -- Reconstructions: class consciousness and class formation -- 12.5 Class and other forms of oppression: class and gender -- Traditional understanding -- Confirmations -- Surprises -- Reconstructions -- References -- Index of names -- Index of subjects.
Summary: This textbook provides a lively exploration of the concept of class and its relevance for understanding contemporary social issues.
Holdings
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Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
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Total holds: 0

Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface to student edition -- Preface to original edition -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Class analysis -- 1.1 The parable of the shmoo -- 1.2 The concept of exploitation -- 1.3 Class and exploitation -- 1.4 Adding complexities to the concept of class structure -- 1 The problem of the "middle class'' among employees -- Authority -- Skills and expertise -- A map of middle-class class locations -- 2 People not in the paid labor force -- 3 Employee investments -- 4 Temporality -- 1.5 Marxist versus Weberian class analysis -- 1.6 The empirical agenda of the book -- Class structure -- Class and gender -- Class structure and class consciousness -- Part I Structural analyses of classes -- 2. Class structure -- 2.1 The basic contours of the class structure -- The property dimension -- Employees -- 2.2 Class and gender -- 2.3 Class and race -- 2.4 Class structure: a summing up -- 3. The transformation of the American class structure, 1960-1990 -- 3.1 Contrasting expectations of post-industrial and Marxist theory -- 3.2 Methodological strategy -- 3.3 Results -- Refined sectoral analysis -- 3.4 Interpretations and implications -- 4. The fall and rise of the American petty bourgeoisie -- 4.1 Self-employment and economic stagnation -- 4.2 Sectoral decomposition of changes in self-employment -- 4.3 Conclusions and unresolved issues -- 5. The permeability of class boundaries -- 5.1 Theoretical issues -- Permeability in the Marxist and Weberian traditions -- Static and dynamic permeability -- 5.2 Methodological strategy -- Operationalizing class structure -- The permeability-event matrix -- Alternative approaches to analyzing permeability -- How to read the results -- 5.3 Intergenerational class mobility -- Theoretical expectations -- The relative permeability of class boundaries.

Cross-national variations -- Hypotheses -- A note on gender and class boundary permeability to mobility -- Results -- The relative permeability of class boundaries -- Mobility across the working-class boundary -- Cross-national variations -- Conclusions for mobility analyses -- 5.4 Cross-class friendships -- Orienting hypotheses -- Class interests (Marxian variant) -- Class interests (Dahrendorf variant) -- Class habitus (Bourdieu) -- Interaction opportunity -- Results -- The relative permeability of the three exploitation boundaries -- Friendship ties between the working class and other class locations -- Variations across countries in permeability to friendships -- Conclusion for the friendship analysis -- 5.5 Cross-class families -- Results -- Patterns of cross-class families -- The relative permeability of the three class boundaries -- The locational permeability of boundaries between working-class and other class locations -- Country interactions -- 5.6 Comparing the three forms of class-boundary permeability -- Part II Class and gender -- 6. Conceptualizing the interaction of class and gender -- 6.1 The debate over class primacy -- 6.2 Forms of interconnection of class and gender -- 1 Gender as a form of class relations -- 2 Gender relations and class relations as reciprocally affecting each other -- 3 Gender as a sorting mechanism into class locations -- 4 Gender as mediated linkage to class location -- 5 Gender as a causal interaction with class in determining outcomes -- 7. Individuals, families and class analysis -- 7.1 The debate on women and class -- 7.2 An alternative approach: direct and mediated class locations -- 7.3 A strategy for studying the effects of direct and mediated class locations -- Hypotheses -- Goldthorpe hypotheses -- Mediated and direct class locations hypotheses -- 7.4 Results -- 7.4 Implications -- 7.5 Conclusion.

8. The noneffects of class on the gendered division of labor in the home -- 8.1 Theoretical expectations -- Proletarianization and gender equality -- Sexism and class cultures -- Class and power within the family -- Autonomy of gender relations -- 8.2 Results -- Husband's housework contributions: descriptive results -- Variations in husband's housework across class location -- 8.3 Implications -- 9. The gender gap in workplace authority -- 9.1 Analytical strategy for studying the "gender gap'' -- 9.2 Empirical agenda -- Authority variables -- Analyzing the net gender gap in having authority within countries -- 1. Compositional factors -- 2. Self-selection because of family responsibilities -- The glass-ceiling hypothesis -- Explaining cross-national variations -- 1. Gender ideology -- 2. Women's reproductive and sexual rights -- 3. Gender earnings gap -- 4. Occupational sex segregation -- 5. The proportion of the labor force with authority -- 6. The organized women's movement and political culture -- 9.3 Results -- The gross gender grap in authority -- Net gender differences in authority with compositional controls -- Self-selection models -- The glass-ceiling hypothesis -- Explaining cross-national variations -- 1. Gender ideology -- 2. Sexual and reproductive rights -- 3. Gender earnings gap -- 4. Occupational sex segregation -- 5. The proportion of the labor force with authority -- 6. The organized women's movement and political culture -- 9.4 Conclusions -- Part III Class structure and class consciousness -- 10. A general framework for studying class consciousness and class formation -- 10.1 Micro- and macro-levels of analysis -- 10.2 Basic concepts -- Class structure and class location -- Class formation -- Class practices -- Class struggle -- Class consciousness -- 1. Perceptions and observations -- 2. Theories of Consequences -- 3. Preferences.

Limitation, selection and transformation -- 10.3 The micro-model -- 1. Class locations -limits… -- 2. Class locations -limits… -- 3. Class consciousness -selects… -- 4. Individual class practices -transforms… -- 5. Individual class practices -transforms… -- 10.4 The macro-model -- 1. Class structure -limits… -- 2. Class structure -limits… -- 3. Class formation -selects… -- 4. Class struggles -transforms… -- 5. Class struggles -transforms… -- 10.5 Putting the micro- and macro-models together -- 10.6 Using the models in empirical research -- 11. Class structure, class consciousness and class formation in Sweden, the United States and Japan -- 11.1 Measuring class consciousness -- 11.2 The empirical agenda -- Class locations and class consciousness -- Class formation -- Class consciousness -- 11.3 Results: the overall relationship between locations in the class structure and class consciousness -- 11.4 Results: the macro-analysis of class formation -- Sweden -- The United States -- Japan -- Summary of the comparisons of the three countries -- 11.5 Explaining the differences in class formations -- State employment -- Unionization -- Japan -- 11.5 The micro-analysis of class consciousness -- Additive country effects -- Cross-national comparisons of micro-equations -- 11.6 A brief note on class, race, gender and consciousness -- 11.7 Conclusion -- Part IV Conclusion -- 12. Confirmations, surprises and theoretical reconstructions -- 12.1 Conceptualizing "locations'' in the class structure -- Traditional understanding -- Initial reconstruction -- Empirical confirmations -- Surprises -- Further possible reconstructions? -- 12.2 Class structure and its variations in advanced capitalist societies -- Traditional understanding -- Confirmations -- Surprises -- Reconstructions -- 12.3 Individual lives and the class structure -- Traditional understanding.

Confirmations -- Surprises -- Reconstructions -- 12.4 Effects of class structure: class consciousness and class formation -- Traditional understanding -- Confirmations -- Surprises: direct and mediated class locations -- Surprises: class consciousness and class formation -- Reconstructions: direct and mediated class locations -- Reconstructions: class consciousness and class formation -- 12.5 Class and other forms of oppression: class and gender -- Traditional understanding -- Confirmations -- Surprises -- Reconstructions -- References -- Index of names -- Index of subjects.

This textbook provides a lively exploration of the concept of class and its relevance for understanding contemporary social issues.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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