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The Syntax of Early English.

By: Contributor(s): Series: Cambridge Syntax GuidesPublisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2001Copyright date: ©2001Description: 1 online resource (361 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9780511151057
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Syntax of Early EnglishDDC classification:
  • 429.5
LOC classification:
  • PE1369 .S96 2000
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Editions used -- 1 Language change and grammar change -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Historical change, language acquisition and the Principles and Parameters model -- 1.2.1 Language acquisition and grammar change -- 1.2.1.1 The history of English modals -- 1.2.2 The Principles and Parameters model -- 1.2.3 More on language acquisition and grammar change -- 1.2.3.1 Degree 0 learnability and robustness -- 1.2.3.2 Input matching -- 1.2.3.3 Cue-based learning -- 1.2.4 Synchronic variation and grammar competition -- 1.3 Grammar change and language change -- 1.3.1 Prototypes and notions -- 1.3.2 Surface similarities -- 1.3.3 Grammaticalization -- 1.4 Methodology and the role of data -- 1.4.1 How to handle data -- 1.4.2 Frequency -- 1.4.3 The role of the theory in deciding data questions -- 1.5 Overview of the book -- 2 An outline of Old English syntax -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Morphology and case assignment -- 2.2.1 Old English verbal and nominal inflections -- 2.2.2 Impersonal verbs -- 2.3 Word order -- 2.3.1 Word order at the NP level -- 2.3.2 Word order at the clause level -- 2.4 Some clause types -- 2.4.1 Questions -- 2.4.2 Negation -- 2.5 Subordinate clauses -- 2.5.1 Relative clauses -- 2.5.2 Complement clauses -- 2.5.2.1 Finite clauses -- 2.5.2.2 Non-finite clauses -- 2.5.3 Adverbial clauses -- 2.6 Preposition stranding -- 3 An outline of Middle English syntax -- 3.1 Introductory remarks -- 3.2 Morphology and case assignment -- 3.2.1 Middle English verbal and nominal inflections -- 3.2.2 Impersonal verbs -- 3.2.3 Passives -- 3.3 Word order -- 3.3.1 Word order within the NP -- 3.3.2 Within the clause -- 3.4 Clause types -- 3.4.1 Question formation -- 3.4.2 Negation -- 3.5 Subordinate clauses -- 3.5.1 Relative clauses -- 3.5.2 Complement clauses.
3.5.3 Adverbial clauses -- 4 The Verb-Second constraint and its loss -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The facts -- 4.3 The position of the finite verb: Verb-Second? -- 4.3.1 Verb-Second in present-day Germanic -- 4.3.2 Verb-Second in Old English -- 4.3.2.1 The role of personal pronouns -- 4.3.2.2 Sentential negation and its implications for Verb-Second -- 4.3.2.3 Quantitative evidence -- 4.4 Developments after the Old English period -- 5 The loss of object-verb word order -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Old English: the basic facts -- 5.3 Old English word order: OV or VO? -- 5.3.1 One uniform clause structure? -- 5.3.1.1 The OV approach -- 5.3.1.2 The VO approach -- 5.3.1.3 Variation between OV and VO order -- 5.3.2 Towards a VO analysis -- 5.4 Middle English: the basic facts -- 5.5 Analysing the Middle English word order patterns -- 5.6 The diachrony of OV and VO order -- 6 Verb-particles in Old and Middle English -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Particles: some general considerations -- 6.2.1 Problems of definition: what is a particle? -- 6.2.2 Differences between particles and prefixes -- 6.3 Particles in Old English -- 6.3.1 Particles in main clauses -- 6.3.2 Particles in coordinate clauses -- 6.3.3 Particles in subordinate clauses -- 6.4 Position of the particle marks the position of the verb before movement -- 6.4.1 Koster's (1975) arguments for Dutch -- 6.4.2 Koster's test applied to Old English -- 6.4.3 Particles following the verb in subordinate clauses: evidence for V-movement -- 6.5 The universal base hypothesis -- 6.6 Some remaining problems: particles separated from the verb (part…V) -- 6.7 Particles in Middle English -- 6.7.1 Material between verb and particle (V…part) -- 6.7.2 Analyses of the change in particle position -- 6.7.2.1 …particles no longer mark the position of the verb in Middle English -- 6.7.2.2 Universal base hypothesis -- 6.8 Conclusion.
7 Changes in infinitival constructions -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 New infinitival constructions: constructions containing a lexical subject -- 7.2.1 The rise of the (for) NP to V construction -- 7.2.2 Accusative and infinitive constructions (AcI) -- 7.2.3 Passive infinitives -- 7.2.4 The AcI and the passive infinitive -- 7.3 Borrowing and internal factors: the Latin AcI in the history of Dutch -- 8 The history of the 'easy-to-please' construction -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Theoretical issues in the analysis of 'easy-to-please' -- 8.3 Data and analysis for Old English -- 8.4 Data and analysis for Middle English -- 8.5 Explaining the changes in Middle English -- 9 Grammaticalization and grammar change -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Grammaticalization theory -- 9.2.1 What is grammaticalization? -- 9.2.2 Parameters of grammaticalization -- 9.2.3 Some core concepts of grammaticalization theory -- 9.2.4 Grammaticalization and grammar change -- 9.3 Two case studies -- 9.3.1 The grammaticalization of have to -- 9.3.2 Jespersen's cycle in the history of English -- 9.3.2.1 The earliest Old English -- 9.3.2.2 Middle English -- 9.3.3 Concluding discussion -- References -- Index.
Summary: This is a guide to the development of English syntax between the Old and Modern periods.
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Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Editions used -- 1 Language change and grammar change -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Historical change, language acquisition and the Principles and Parameters model -- 1.2.1 Language acquisition and grammar change -- 1.2.1.1 The history of English modals -- 1.2.2 The Principles and Parameters model -- 1.2.3 More on language acquisition and grammar change -- 1.2.3.1 Degree 0 learnability and robustness -- 1.2.3.2 Input matching -- 1.2.3.3 Cue-based learning -- 1.2.4 Synchronic variation and grammar competition -- 1.3 Grammar change and language change -- 1.3.1 Prototypes and notions -- 1.3.2 Surface similarities -- 1.3.3 Grammaticalization -- 1.4 Methodology and the role of data -- 1.4.1 How to handle data -- 1.4.2 Frequency -- 1.4.3 The role of the theory in deciding data questions -- 1.5 Overview of the book -- 2 An outline of Old English syntax -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Morphology and case assignment -- 2.2.1 Old English verbal and nominal inflections -- 2.2.2 Impersonal verbs -- 2.3 Word order -- 2.3.1 Word order at the NP level -- 2.3.2 Word order at the clause level -- 2.4 Some clause types -- 2.4.1 Questions -- 2.4.2 Negation -- 2.5 Subordinate clauses -- 2.5.1 Relative clauses -- 2.5.2 Complement clauses -- 2.5.2.1 Finite clauses -- 2.5.2.2 Non-finite clauses -- 2.5.3 Adverbial clauses -- 2.6 Preposition stranding -- 3 An outline of Middle English syntax -- 3.1 Introductory remarks -- 3.2 Morphology and case assignment -- 3.2.1 Middle English verbal and nominal inflections -- 3.2.2 Impersonal verbs -- 3.2.3 Passives -- 3.3 Word order -- 3.3.1 Word order within the NP -- 3.3.2 Within the clause -- 3.4 Clause types -- 3.4.1 Question formation -- 3.4.2 Negation -- 3.5 Subordinate clauses -- 3.5.1 Relative clauses -- 3.5.2 Complement clauses.

3.5.3 Adverbial clauses -- 4 The Verb-Second constraint and its loss -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The facts -- 4.3 The position of the finite verb: Verb-Second? -- 4.3.1 Verb-Second in present-day Germanic -- 4.3.2 Verb-Second in Old English -- 4.3.2.1 The role of personal pronouns -- 4.3.2.2 Sentential negation and its implications for Verb-Second -- 4.3.2.3 Quantitative evidence -- 4.4 Developments after the Old English period -- 5 The loss of object-verb word order -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Old English: the basic facts -- 5.3 Old English word order: OV or VO? -- 5.3.1 One uniform clause structure? -- 5.3.1.1 The OV approach -- 5.3.1.2 The VO approach -- 5.3.1.3 Variation between OV and VO order -- 5.3.2 Towards a VO analysis -- 5.4 Middle English: the basic facts -- 5.5 Analysing the Middle English word order patterns -- 5.6 The diachrony of OV and VO order -- 6 Verb-particles in Old and Middle English -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Particles: some general considerations -- 6.2.1 Problems of definition: what is a particle? -- 6.2.2 Differences between particles and prefixes -- 6.3 Particles in Old English -- 6.3.1 Particles in main clauses -- 6.3.2 Particles in coordinate clauses -- 6.3.3 Particles in subordinate clauses -- 6.4 Position of the particle marks the position of the verb before movement -- 6.4.1 Koster's (1975) arguments for Dutch -- 6.4.2 Koster's test applied to Old English -- 6.4.3 Particles following the verb in subordinate clauses: evidence for V-movement -- 6.5 The universal base hypothesis -- 6.6 Some remaining problems: particles separated from the verb (part…V) -- 6.7 Particles in Middle English -- 6.7.1 Material between verb and particle (V…part) -- 6.7.2 Analyses of the change in particle position -- 6.7.2.1 …particles no longer mark the position of the verb in Middle English -- 6.7.2.2 Universal base hypothesis -- 6.8 Conclusion.

7 Changes in infinitival constructions -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 New infinitival constructions: constructions containing a lexical subject -- 7.2.1 The rise of the (for) NP to V construction -- 7.2.2 Accusative and infinitive constructions (AcI) -- 7.2.3 Passive infinitives -- 7.2.4 The AcI and the passive infinitive -- 7.3 Borrowing and internal factors: the Latin AcI in the history of Dutch -- 8 The history of the 'easy-to-please' construction -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Theoretical issues in the analysis of 'easy-to-please' -- 8.3 Data and analysis for Old English -- 8.4 Data and analysis for Middle English -- 8.5 Explaining the changes in Middle English -- 9 Grammaticalization and grammar change -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Grammaticalization theory -- 9.2.1 What is grammaticalization? -- 9.2.2 Parameters of grammaticalization -- 9.2.3 Some core concepts of grammaticalization theory -- 9.2.4 Grammaticalization and grammar change -- 9.3 Two case studies -- 9.3.1 The grammaticalization of have to -- 9.3.2 Jespersen's cycle in the history of English -- 9.3.2.1 The earliest Old English -- 9.3.2.2 Middle English -- 9.3.3 Concluding discussion -- References -- Index.

This is a guide to the development of English syntax between the Old and Modern periods.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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