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Substance and Individuation in Leibniz.

By: Contributor(s): Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1999Copyright date: ©1999Description: 1 online resource (319 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9780511151538
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Substance and Individuation in LeibnizDDC classification:
  • 110
LOC classification:
  • B2599.M7 C68 1999
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- CHAPTER 1 Leibniz and the problem of individuation: the historical and philosophical context -- 1 APPROACHES TO THE METAPHYSICS OF INDIVIDUATION -- 1.1 The blueprint approach -- 1.2 The modal approach -- 2 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO INDIVIDUATION THROUGH SCHOLASTIC EYES -- 2.1 Criteria of identity -- 2.2 Modern essentialist semantics -- 3 THE EARLY LEIBNIZ: DISPUTATIO METAPHYSICA DE PRINCIPIO INDIVIDUI -- 3.1 Four themes in the ''Disputatio'' -- 3.2 The whole entity doctrine: reflections on Leibniz's positive account -- 3.3 Simplicity -- 4 PRELIMINARY REMARKS ON THE MATURE LEIBNIZ -- 4.1 Composite beings? -- 4.2 Leibnizian monads and individuation: looking ahead -- CHAPTER 2 Relations -- 1 EARLY LEIBNIZ -- 2 RELATIONS AND SUBJECT-PREDICATE EXPRESSIONS -- 2.1 Some scholastic background -- 2.2 Relational predicates -- 2.3 Relational construals of intrinsic denominations -- 3 SUBSTANCES AND PERCEPTUAL ACCIDENTS -- 4 RELATIONS AND REDUCTION -- 4.1 Reduction and equivalence objections -- 4.2 A supervenience model -- 4.3 Relations and relational accidents -- CHAPTER 3 Essentialism -- 1 SUPERESSENTIALISM VS. STRONG ESSENTIALISM -- 1.1 Superessentialism -- 1.2 Relational properties and superessentialism -- 1.3 Harmonious correspondence and superessentialism -- 1.4 Laws and strong essentialism -- 2 LEIBNIZIAN ESSENTIALISM, WORLDS, AND COUNTERPART THEORY -- 2.1 God and possible worlds -- 2.2 Counterpart theory -- 3 MODERATE ESSENTIALISM -- 3.1 Counterparts and complete concepts -- 3.2 Superintrinsicalness and superessentialism -- 4 STRONG ESSENTIALISM AND COMPOSSIBILITY -- 4.1 Some problems for strong essentialism -- 4.2 Wilson and Russell -- 4.3 Debugging the Spinozistic bugaboo -- 4.4 Hypothetical necessity and compossibility.
4.5 Space, time and incompossibility -- CODA: MIRACLES AND ESSENTIALISM -- CHAPTER 4 Haecceitism and anti-haecceitism -- 1 ANTI-HAECCEITIST PRESSURES -- 1.1 General propositions and 'de re' modality -- 1.2 Leibniz's generalism -- 2 THE IMPORTANCE OF HAECCEITISM TO LEIBNIZ'S PHILOSOPHY -- 2.1 Haecceitism… -- 2.2 Strong and weak haecceitism -- 3 HOW IS LEIBNIZ'S HAECCEITISM POSSIBLE? -- 3.1 Rationalism and singular propositions -- 3.2 Some false starts -- 3.3 Salvaging weak haecceitism -- 3.4 Whence the complete concept doctrine? Metaphysics and reference -- CHAPTER 5 Sufficient reason and the identity of indiscernibles -- 1 TWO STYLES OF ARGUMENT FOR P -- 1.1 The familiar… -- 1.2 An alternative… -- 2 EXPLAINING THE NO-REASON ARGUMENT FOR P -- 2.1 Two objections -- 2.2 Another Leibnizian principle -- 2.3 Answering the objections -- 3 COMPARING THE TWO STYLES OF P ARGUMENT -- 3.1 Switching and interpenetration -- A. Divine preference -- B. No reason -- 3.2 The modal strength of P -- 4 DIVINE WILL, DIVINE NATURE, AND METAPHYSICS -- CHAPTER 6 Law-of-the-series, identity, and change -- 1 THE METAPHYSICS OF INDIVIDUAL SUBSTANCE -- 1.1. Complete concept and haecceity -- 1.2 Haecceity and the law-of-the-series -- 1.3 Laws-of-the-series and form as active -- 2 SUBSTANTIAL LAWS ON THE MODEL OF IMMANENT FUNCTIONS -- 2.1 Immanent functions -- 2.2 Miracles -- 2.3 Marks and traces -- 3 SUBSTANTIAL FORM, COMMUNICABILITY, AND TIME -- CHAPTER 7 The threat of one substance -- 1 MOTIVATING THE ONE-SUBSTANCE THREAT -- 2 TWO LEIBNIZIAN THESES -- 2.1. Relations cannot individuate substances -- 2.2 The basic properties are simple, positive and compatible -- 2.3 Spinozistic trouble -- 3 RETURNING TO RUSSELL -- 4 A PHILOSOPHICAL EXAMINATION OF OUR MAIN PROBLEM -- 4.1 Relation -- 4.2 Accidents -- 4.3 Matter -- 4.4 Haecceities -- 4.5 Negation -- 4.6 All -- 5 A PARTIAL RESCUE.
6 POSTSCRIPT: KANT ON LEIBNIZ -- Bibliography -- I . LEIBNIZ SOURCES -- II. OTHER HISTORICAL SOURCES -- III SECONDARY SOURCES -- Index.
Summary: A sustained re-evaluation of the most central and perplexing themes of Leibniz's metaphysics.
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Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- CHAPTER 1 Leibniz and the problem of individuation: the historical and philosophical context -- 1 APPROACHES TO THE METAPHYSICS OF INDIVIDUATION -- 1.1 The blueprint approach -- 1.2 The modal approach -- 2 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO INDIVIDUATION THROUGH SCHOLASTIC EYES -- 2.1 Criteria of identity -- 2.2 Modern essentialist semantics -- 3 THE EARLY LEIBNIZ: DISPUTATIO METAPHYSICA DE PRINCIPIO INDIVIDUI -- 3.1 Four themes in the ''Disputatio'' -- 3.2 The whole entity doctrine: reflections on Leibniz's positive account -- 3.3 Simplicity -- 4 PRELIMINARY REMARKS ON THE MATURE LEIBNIZ -- 4.1 Composite beings? -- 4.2 Leibnizian monads and individuation: looking ahead -- CHAPTER 2 Relations -- 1 EARLY LEIBNIZ -- 2 RELATIONS AND SUBJECT-PREDICATE EXPRESSIONS -- 2.1 Some scholastic background -- 2.2 Relational predicates -- 2.3 Relational construals of intrinsic denominations -- 3 SUBSTANCES AND PERCEPTUAL ACCIDENTS -- 4 RELATIONS AND REDUCTION -- 4.1 Reduction and equivalence objections -- 4.2 A supervenience model -- 4.3 Relations and relational accidents -- CHAPTER 3 Essentialism -- 1 SUPERESSENTIALISM VS. STRONG ESSENTIALISM -- 1.1 Superessentialism -- 1.2 Relational properties and superessentialism -- 1.3 Harmonious correspondence and superessentialism -- 1.4 Laws and strong essentialism -- 2 LEIBNIZIAN ESSENTIALISM, WORLDS, AND COUNTERPART THEORY -- 2.1 God and possible worlds -- 2.2 Counterpart theory -- 3 MODERATE ESSENTIALISM -- 3.1 Counterparts and complete concepts -- 3.2 Superintrinsicalness and superessentialism -- 4 STRONG ESSENTIALISM AND COMPOSSIBILITY -- 4.1 Some problems for strong essentialism -- 4.2 Wilson and Russell -- 4.3 Debugging the Spinozistic bugaboo -- 4.4 Hypothetical necessity and compossibility.

4.5 Space, time and incompossibility -- CODA: MIRACLES AND ESSENTIALISM -- CHAPTER 4 Haecceitism and anti-haecceitism -- 1 ANTI-HAECCEITIST PRESSURES -- 1.1 General propositions and 'de re' modality -- 1.2 Leibniz's generalism -- 2 THE IMPORTANCE OF HAECCEITISM TO LEIBNIZ'S PHILOSOPHY -- 2.1 Haecceitism… -- 2.2 Strong and weak haecceitism -- 3 HOW IS LEIBNIZ'S HAECCEITISM POSSIBLE? -- 3.1 Rationalism and singular propositions -- 3.2 Some false starts -- 3.3 Salvaging weak haecceitism -- 3.4 Whence the complete concept doctrine? Metaphysics and reference -- CHAPTER 5 Sufficient reason and the identity of indiscernibles -- 1 TWO STYLES OF ARGUMENT FOR P -- 1.1 The familiar… -- 1.2 An alternative… -- 2 EXPLAINING THE NO-REASON ARGUMENT FOR P -- 2.1 Two objections -- 2.2 Another Leibnizian principle -- 2.3 Answering the objections -- 3 COMPARING THE TWO STYLES OF P ARGUMENT -- 3.1 Switching and interpenetration -- A. Divine preference -- B. No reason -- 3.2 The modal strength of P -- 4 DIVINE WILL, DIVINE NATURE, AND METAPHYSICS -- CHAPTER 6 Law-of-the-series, identity, and change -- 1 THE METAPHYSICS OF INDIVIDUAL SUBSTANCE -- 1.1. Complete concept and haecceity -- 1.2 Haecceity and the law-of-the-series -- 1.3 Laws-of-the-series and form as active -- 2 SUBSTANTIAL LAWS ON THE MODEL OF IMMANENT FUNCTIONS -- 2.1 Immanent functions -- 2.2 Miracles -- 2.3 Marks and traces -- 3 SUBSTANTIAL FORM, COMMUNICABILITY, AND TIME -- CHAPTER 7 The threat of one substance -- 1 MOTIVATING THE ONE-SUBSTANCE THREAT -- 2 TWO LEIBNIZIAN THESES -- 2.1. Relations cannot individuate substances -- 2.2 The basic properties are simple, positive and compatible -- 2.3 Spinozistic trouble -- 3 RETURNING TO RUSSELL -- 4 A PHILOSOPHICAL EXAMINATION OF OUR MAIN PROBLEM -- 4.1 Relation -- 4.2 Accidents -- 4.3 Matter -- 4.4 Haecceities -- 4.5 Negation -- 4.6 All -- 5 A PARTIAL RESCUE.

6 POSTSCRIPT: KANT ON LEIBNIZ -- Bibliography -- I . LEIBNIZ SOURCES -- II. OTHER HISTORICAL SOURCES -- III SECONDARY SOURCES -- Index.

A sustained re-evaluation of the most central and perplexing themes of Leibniz's metaphysics.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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