Hölderlin's Hymns Germania and the Rhine.

By: Heidegger, MartinContributor(s): McNeill, William | Ireland, Julia AnneSeries: Studies in Continental Thought SerPublisher: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (308 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780253014306Subject(s): Heolderlin, FriedrichGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hölderlin's Hymns Germania and the RhineDDC classification: 831/.6 LOC classification: PT2359.H2 -- .H453 2014ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Cover -- CONTENTS -- Translators' Foreword -- Preliminary Remark -- INTRODUCTION -- 1. Outline of the Beginning, Manner of Proceeding, and Approach of the Lecture Course -- a) Concerning the Nature of Our Beginning. Commencement and Beginning -- b) Concerning Our Manner of Proceeding in General. Poetizing and Thinking -- c) Concerning Our Particular Approach. The Poetic Dasein of the Poet -- PART ONE: "GERMANIA" -- Chapter One: Preparatory Reflection: Poetry and Language -- 2. Provisional Path of Approach to the Poem as a Piece of Text -- a) The Overarching Resonance of the Telling as Origin for the Choice and Positioning of Words -- b) 'Content and Form' of the Poem, 'Depiction in Images' -- c) Hölderlin's 'Worldview' -- 3. Entering the Domain in Which Poetry Unfolds Its Power -- a) The Prevailing of Poetry in the Dasein of the Peoples -- b) Working Our Way through the Poem as a Struggle with Ourselves -- c) Two Textual Questions -- 4. Concerning the Essence of Poetry -- a) The Commonplace Conception of Poetry as an Outward Manifestation of Lived Experiences -- b) The Provenance of the Word Dichten, to 'Poetize' -- c) Poetizing as Telling in the Manner of a Making Manifest That Points -- d) Poetizing as Receiving the Beckonings of the Gods and Passing Them on to the People -- e) Everyday Appearance and the Being of Poetry -- f) Poetry Not as Merit, but Exposure to Beyng -- g) Poetic and Thoughtful Telling -- 5. The Question Concerning the 'We' in the Turbulence of the Dialogue -- a) The 'I' in Refusal of the Gods of Old -- b) The 'We,' the Man, and the Eagle. The Speaking of Language -- c) The Beginnings of the Strophes -- d) The Relation of Today's Human Being to the Greeks and Their Gods -- e) The Question 'Who Are We?' -- 6. Determining the 'We' from out of the Horizon of the Question of Time.
a) The Calculable Time of the Individual and the Originary Time of the Peoples -- b) The Historical Time of the Peoples as the Time of the Creators -- c) A Textual Question: Different Versions of "Patmos" -- d) Two Concepts of Eternity -- e) The Time That Is Essentially Long -- f) The Creators' Knowing When It Is Not the Time for the True to Come to Pass -- g) The Distinction between the Question What We Are and the Question Who We Are -- h) Partaking in the Poetry -- 7. The Linguistic Character of Poetry -- a) Language as the Most Dangerous of Goods -- b) The Decline of Language. The Essence and Corrupted Essence of Language -- c) Language and the Human Being's Fundamental Orientations toward Beings as a Whole -- d) Language as the Human Being's Protection against the God -- e) Poetizing and Language as Configuring the Ground of Historical Dasein -- f) The Being of the Human Being as Dialogue. Being Able to Hear and Speaking -- g) Being Exposed to Beings, the Individual and the Community -- h) Summary -- i) The Absence of Language in the Animal and in 'Nature' -- j) Poetizing and Language in Their Originary Belonging to the History of the Human Being -- Chapter Two: The Fundamental Attunement of Poetizing and the Historicality of Dasein -- 8. Unfolding the Fundamental Attunement -- a) The Provenance of Poetic Telling from out of the Fundamental Attunement -- b) Renouncing Calling the Gods of Old as Sustaining a Conflict. The Fundamental Attunement of Mourning and Its Three Aspects -- c) The Fundamental Attunement and the Holy. A Threefold Sheer Disinterestedness -- d) A Holy Mourning 'with' the Homeland as the Power of the Earth -- e) The Transposition of the Human Being Together with Beings into Attunement -- f) The Fundamental Attunement as a Mourning with the Rivers of the Earth of the Homeland.
g) The Opening Power of the Fundamental Attunement. Preserving the Divinity of the Old Gods While Mournfully Renouncing Them -- h) The Essentially Lawful Sequence of Decline Belonging to a Historical Dasein within the Need of the Absence of the Gods -- i) The Enduring of Abandonment by Those Who Doubt -- j) The Completion of the Prevailing Fundamental Attunement into Its Full Essence: The Distress of Holy Mourning as Readiness -- 9. Historical Time and Fundamental Attunement -- a) The Experience of the Earth of the Homeland in the Lucidity of a Questioning Knowing Concerning the Historical Mission of a People -- b) Provenance of the Pivotal Times of the Peoples from out of the Abyss -- c) Primordial Movedness of Fundamental Attunement. Having-Been and Past -- d) Temporalizing of Originary Time as the Fundamental Occurrence of the Fundamental Attunement -- e) The Decision in Favor of the Authentic Time of Poetizing as a Decision to Enter into the Fundamental Attunement -- 10. The Locale of Dasein Founded in "Germania" within the Horizon of the Heraclitean Thought -- a) The Poetic Telling of the Fundamental Attunement from a Standing within and Sustaining of Essential Conflicts -- α) The Nexus of Occurrence of the Images and the Attuning Power of the Fundamental Attunement -- β) Fundamental Attunement and "Intimacy." The Preserving Veiling of the Fundamental Attunement through the Nexus of Images of the Poetizing -- b) The Locale of Dasein Founded in "Germania" -- α) The "Fatherland" as the Historical Beyng of a People -- β) The Decline of the Fatherland as the Emergence of a New Unity of Nature and Humans -- c) On Hölderlin's Understanding of Being. The Power of the Heraclitean Thought -- α) Holderlin and Heraclitus -- β) Holderlin and Hegel.
d) Founding of the Need Pertaining to a New Commencement of Our Historical Dasein within the Metaphysical Need of the Western World -- 11. Transitional Overview and Summary: Revisiting the Domains Opened Up Thus Far as a Way of Determining More Precisely the Intent of the Lecture Course -- a) The Four Essential Components of the Fundamental Attunement -- b) Fundamental Attunement as Exposure in the Midst of Beings That Are Manifest as a Whole -- c) Fundamental Attunement as Truth of a People. The Three Creative Forces of Historical Dasein -- d) Historical and Historiographical Truth -- e) Awakening the Fundamental Attunement as a Founding of Futural Historical Beyng -- f) The Conflict of Mourning and Joy within the Fundamental Attunement -- g) Entering into the Sphere of the River Poems. Transition from "Germania" to "The Rhine" -- PART TWO: "THE RHINE" -- Transitional Remark: The Question Concerning What Is 'Innermost' in a Poetic Work as a Question of the Opening Up and Founding of Beyng in the Each Time New Prevailing of Its Fundamental Attunement -- Chapter One: The Demigods as Mediating Middle between Gods and Humans. The Fundamental Attunement of the Poem. The Beyng of the Demigods and the Calling of the Poet -- 12. Thinking the Essence of the Demigods in the Founding Projection of the Poet -- a) The Distinction between Humans and Gods Opened Up in the Question Concerning the Essence of the Demigods as Founding a Realm of Beyng in General -- b) The Poet's Being Compelled to Think the Demigods at the Threshold of the Homeland as a Being Enjoined Back into Historical Dasein -- c) Destiny as the Fundamental Word of the Poem. A Preparatory Discussion of Destiny as the Beyng of the Demigods -- d) The Founding and Grounding of Beyng out of the Fundamental Attunement of Suffering-with the Suffering of the Demigods.
13. Strophe I: The Point of Departure for the Telling, and the Composure through Which It Is Experienced. The Apprehending of a Destiny -- a) Dionysos as Witness of Divine and Human Beyng -- b) The Nearness of the Alpine Range as Nearness of the Origin -- 14. Strophes II and III: The River Rhine as Destiny. Hearing Its Origin and Assuming Its Vocation -- a) On the Distinction between a Poetic Understanding of Nature and the Scientific Representation of Nature -- b) Strophe II: Hearing the Origin -- α) Customary Ways of Hearing. The Gods' Hearing with Pity and Mortals' Not Wanting to Hear -- β) The Poet's Hearing That Stands Firm (Suffering) as Apprehending the Originary Origin in Its Springing Forth -- c) Strophe III: Origin, Self-Will, Destiny. Assuming One's Vocation -- α) The Appropriation of Its Authentic Beyng in the Turning of the River's Direction -- β) The Blindness of the Demigods as Excess of Vocation -- γ) The Demigods' Lack from out of Abundance -- Chapter Two: A More Incisive Review. Poetizing and Historical Dasein -- 15. The Task of the Lecture Course: Entering the Domain in Which Poetry Unfolds Its Power, and the Opening Up of Its Actuality -- a) Founding the Essence of Poetizing and Grounding Dasein upon It. Poetizing as the Primordial Language of a People -- b) Hölderlin as the Poet of Future German Beyng -- 16. The Fundamental Approach in Which Our Interpretation Moves, Taking "Germania" as Our Point of Departure -- a) The Essence of Fundamental Attunement. The Thinking and Pondering of the Man in "Germania" as Configured in the Poetic Work "The Rhine" -- b) The Thinking of the Demigods -- 17. The Interpretation in Detail. The River Rhine as Demigod -- a) Strophe I: Reference to Dionysos. The Alps. Strophe II: The River Rhine in Its Origin -- b) Strophe III: The Demigods as the Blindest. The Lack of the Demigods.
c) A Sustaining Suffering of Beyng through the Irruption of a Counter-Will.
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Cover -- CONTENTS -- Translators' Foreword -- Preliminary Remark -- INTRODUCTION -- 1. Outline of the Beginning, Manner of Proceeding, and Approach of the Lecture Course -- a) Concerning the Nature of Our Beginning. Commencement and Beginning -- b) Concerning Our Manner of Proceeding in General. Poetizing and Thinking -- c) Concerning Our Particular Approach. The Poetic Dasein of the Poet -- PART ONE: "GERMANIA" -- Chapter One: Preparatory Reflection: Poetry and Language -- 2. Provisional Path of Approach to the Poem as a Piece of Text -- a) The Overarching Resonance of the Telling as Origin for the Choice and Positioning of Words -- b) 'Content and Form' of the Poem, 'Depiction in Images' -- c) Hölderlin's 'Worldview' -- 3. Entering the Domain in Which Poetry Unfolds Its Power -- a) The Prevailing of Poetry in the Dasein of the Peoples -- b) Working Our Way through the Poem as a Struggle with Ourselves -- c) Two Textual Questions -- 4. Concerning the Essence of Poetry -- a) The Commonplace Conception of Poetry as an Outward Manifestation of Lived Experiences -- b) The Provenance of the Word Dichten, to 'Poetize' -- c) Poetizing as Telling in the Manner of a Making Manifest That Points -- d) Poetizing as Receiving the Beckonings of the Gods and Passing Them on to the People -- e) Everyday Appearance and the Being of Poetry -- f) Poetry Not as Merit, but Exposure to Beyng -- g) Poetic and Thoughtful Telling -- 5. The Question Concerning the 'We' in the Turbulence of the Dialogue -- a) The 'I' in Refusal of the Gods of Old -- b) The 'We,' the Man, and the Eagle. The Speaking of Language -- c) The Beginnings of the Strophes -- d) The Relation of Today's Human Being to the Greeks and Their Gods -- e) The Question 'Who Are We?' -- 6. Determining the 'We' from out of the Horizon of the Question of Time.

a) The Calculable Time of the Individual and the Originary Time of the Peoples -- b) The Historical Time of the Peoples as the Time of the Creators -- c) A Textual Question: Different Versions of "Patmos" -- d) Two Concepts of Eternity -- e) The Time That Is Essentially Long -- f) The Creators' Knowing When It Is Not the Time for the True to Come to Pass -- g) The Distinction between the Question What We Are and the Question Who We Are -- h) Partaking in the Poetry -- 7. The Linguistic Character of Poetry -- a) Language as the Most Dangerous of Goods -- b) The Decline of Language. The Essence and Corrupted Essence of Language -- c) Language and the Human Being's Fundamental Orientations toward Beings as a Whole -- d) Language as the Human Being's Protection against the God -- e) Poetizing and Language as Configuring the Ground of Historical Dasein -- f) The Being of the Human Being as Dialogue. Being Able to Hear and Speaking -- g) Being Exposed to Beings, the Individual and the Community -- h) Summary -- i) The Absence of Language in the Animal and in 'Nature' -- j) Poetizing and Language in Their Originary Belonging to the History of the Human Being -- Chapter Two: The Fundamental Attunement of Poetizing and the Historicality of Dasein -- 8. Unfolding the Fundamental Attunement -- a) The Provenance of Poetic Telling from out of the Fundamental Attunement -- b) Renouncing Calling the Gods of Old as Sustaining a Conflict. The Fundamental Attunement of Mourning and Its Three Aspects -- c) The Fundamental Attunement and the Holy. A Threefold Sheer Disinterestedness -- d) A Holy Mourning 'with' the Homeland as the Power of the Earth -- e) The Transposition of the Human Being Together with Beings into Attunement -- f) The Fundamental Attunement as a Mourning with the Rivers of the Earth of the Homeland.

g) The Opening Power of the Fundamental Attunement. Preserving the Divinity of the Old Gods While Mournfully Renouncing Them -- h) The Essentially Lawful Sequence of Decline Belonging to a Historical Dasein within the Need of the Absence of the Gods -- i) The Enduring of Abandonment by Those Who Doubt -- j) The Completion of the Prevailing Fundamental Attunement into Its Full Essence: The Distress of Holy Mourning as Readiness -- 9. Historical Time and Fundamental Attunement -- a) The Experience of the Earth of the Homeland in the Lucidity of a Questioning Knowing Concerning the Historical Mission of a People -- b) Provenance of the Pivotal Times of the Peoples from out of the Abyss -- c) Primordial Movedness of Fundamental Attunement. Having-Been and Past -- d) Temporalizing of Originary Time as the Fundamental Occurrence of the Fundamental Attunement -- e) The Decision in Favor of the Authentic Time of Poetizing as a Decision to Enter into the Fundamental Attunement -- 10. The Locale of Dasein Founded in "Germania" within the Horizon of the Heraclitean Thought -- a) The Poetic Telling of the Fundamental Attunement from a Standing within and Sustaining of Essential Conflicts -- α) The Nexus of Occurrence of the Images and the Attuning Power of the Fundamental Attunement -- β) Fundamental Attunement and "Intimacy." The Preserving Veiling of the Fundamental Attunement through the Nexus of Images of the Poetizing -- b) The Locale of Dasein Founded in "Germania" -- α) The "Fatherland" as the Historical Beyng of a People -- β) The Decline of the Fatherland as the Emergence of a New Unity of Nature and Humans -- c) On Hölderlin's Understanding of Being. The Power of the Heraclitean Thought -- α) Holderlin and Heraclitus -- β) Holderlin and Hegel.

d) Founding of the Need Pertaining to a New Commencement of Our Historical Dasein within the Metaphysical Need of the Western World -- 11. Transitional Overview and Summary: Revisiting the Domains Opened Up Thus Far as a Way of Determining More Precisely the Intent of the Lecture Course -- a) The Four Essential Components of the Fundamental Attunement -- b) Fundamental Attunement as Exposure in the Midst of Beings That Are Manifest as a Whole -- c) Fundamental Attunement as Truth of a People. The Three Creative Forces of Historical Dasein -- d) Historical and Historiographical Truth -- e) Awakening the Fundamental Attunement as a Founding of Futural Historical Beyng -- f) The Conflict of Mourning and Joy within the Fundamental Attunement -- g) Entering into the Sphere of the River Poems. Transition from "Germania" to "The Rhine" -- PART TWO: "THE RHINE" -- Transitional Remark: The Question Concerning What Is 'Innermost' in a Poetic Work as a Question of the Opening Up and Founding of Beyng in the Each Time New Prevailing of Its Fundamental Attunement -- Chapter One: The Demigods as Mediating Middle between Gods and Humans. The Fundamental Attunement of the Poem. The Beyng of the Demigods and the Calling of the Poet -- 12. Thinking the Essence of the Demigods in the Founding Projection of the Poet -- a) The Distinction between Humans and Gods Opened Up in the Question Concerning the Essence of the Demigods as Founding a Realm of Beyng in General -- b) The Poet's Being Compelled to Think the Demigods at the Threshold of the Homeland as a Being Enjoined Back into Historical Dasein -- c) Destiny as the Fundamental Word of the Poem. A Preparatory Discussion of Destiny as the Beyng of the Demigods -- d) The Founding and Grounding of Beyng out of the Fundamental Attunement of Suffering-with the Suffering of the Demigods.

13. Strophe I: The Point of Departure for the Telling, and the Composure through Which It Is Experienced. The Apprehending of a Destiny -- a) Dionysos as Witness of Divine and Human Beyng -- b) The Nearness of the Alpine Range as Nearness of the Origin -- 14. Strophes II and III: The River Rhine as Destiny. Hearing Its Origin and Assuming Its Vocation -- a) On the Distinction between a Poetic Understanding of Nature and the Scientific Representation of Nature -- b) Strophe II: Hearing the Origin -- α) Customary Ways of Hearing. The Gods' Hearing with Pity and Mortals' Not Wanting to Hear -- β) The Poet's Hearing That Stands Firm (Suffering) as Apprehending the Originary Origin in Its Springing Forth -- c) Strophe III: Origin, Self-Will, Destiny. Assuming One's Vocation -- α) The Appropriation of Its Authentic Beyng in the Turning of the River's Direction -- β) The Blindness of the Demigods as Excess of Vocation -- γ) The Demigods' Lack from out of Abundance -- Chapter Two: A More Incisive Review. Poetizing and Historical Dasein -- 15. The Task of the Lecture Course: Entering the Domain in Which Poetry Unfolds Its Power, and the Opening Up of Its Actuality -- a) Founding the Essence of Poetizing and Grounding Dasein upon It. Poetizing as the Primordial Language of a People -- b) Hölderlin as the Poet of Future German Beyng -- 16. The Fundamental Approach in Which Our Interpretation Moves, Taking "Germania" as Our Point of Departure -- a) The Essence of Fundamental Attunement. The Thinking and Pondering of the Man in "Germania" as Configured in the Poetic Work "The Rhine" -- b) The Thinking of the Demigods -- 17. The Interpretation in Detail. The River Rhine as Demigod -- a) Strophe I: Reference to Dionysos. The Alps. Strophe II: The River Rhine in Its Origin -- b) Strophe III: The Demigods as the Blindest. The Lack of the Demigods.

c) A Sustaining Suffering of Beyng through the Irruption of a Counter-Will.

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