A Companion to Intellectual History.

By: Whatmore, RichardContributor(s): Young, BrianSeries: Wiley Blackwell Companions to World History SerPublisher: Newark, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2016Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (557 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781118508084Subject(s): PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Companion to Intellectual HistoryDDC classification: 001.09 LOC classification: B51.4.C66 2016Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Title Page -- Table of Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction -- Part One: Approaches to Intellectual History -- Chapter One: The Identity of Intellectual History -- Introduction -- The practice of intellectual history -- 'Read like a critic' -- Intellectual history and the history of disciplines -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter Two: Intellectual History and Historismus in Post-War England -- Introduction: The history of political thought and the history of historiography -- Friedrich Meinecke and Historismus -- Historismus : from historical method to history of historiography -- Conclusion: Historismus and émigré scholarship -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Three: Intellectual History in the Modern University -- Introduction -- The Sussex anomaly -- John Burrow as an intellectual historian -- Burrow and the working intellectual historian -- Conclusion -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Four: Intellectual History and Poststructuralism -- Introduction -- What is poststructuralism? -- Jacques Derrida -- Deconstruction and social history -- New anxieties -- Reaffirming history -- References -- Chapter Five: Intellectual History as Begriffsgeschichte -- Introduction -- Koselleck and the origins of GG -- The content of GG -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter Six: Intellectual History and History of the Book -- Introduction -- Philology and the history of ideas -- Roger Chartier and linguistic history -- Grafton, Jardine, Waszink and Lipsius -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Seven: Michel Foucault and the Genealogy of Power and Knowledge -- Introduction -- Beginnings: From Nietzsche to the birth of archaeology -- The archaeology of the human sciences -- From archaeology to genealogy -- References -- Chapter Eight: Quentin Skinner and the Relevance of Intellectual History -- Introduction.
Defining linguistic contextualism -- Giving substance to the method -- Intellectual history and present politics -- References -- Chapter Nine: J. G. A. Pocock as an Intellectual Historian -- Language and discourse -- The rise and fall of paradigms -- The nature of history -- Situating Pocock -- References -- Part Two: The Discipline of Intellectual History -- Chapter Ten: Intellectual History and the History of Philosophy -- Introduction -- The history of philosophy -- Offshoots from history of philosophy: history of science and history of ideas -- Intellectual history -- Intellectual history and the history of philosophy: Philosophy in History (1984) -- The context of the 'Introduction' in the Philosophy in History (1984) -- The current relationship between intellectual history and history of philosophy -- References -- Chapter Eleven: Intellectual History and the History of Political Thought -- The history of political thought and present politics -- Unspoken assumptions -- Conditions of possibility -- The global turn -- References -- Chapter Twelve: Intellectual History and the History of Science -- The new historical consciousness -- Science and history in the nineteenth century -- The history of science as an academic discipline -- Decline and redefinition -- Kuhn and the history of paradigms -- References -- Chapter Thirteen: Intellectual History and the History of Economics -- Introduction -- Naming the parts, mapping the territory -- Basic predicament -- Self-sufficiency and present-mindedness -- Survival and growth -- Disjunction or conjunction? -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Fourteen: Art History and Intellectual History -- The nature of art history -- Organising, collecting and intellectualisation: art history before 1900 -- Kunstwollen and iconology: art history in the early twentieth century.
Portraiture studies as theology and natural science: physiognomics and identity -- Portraiture studies as history and philosophy: phenomenology and likeness -- Portraiture studies as psychology and sociology: the 'facial society' -- Conclusions -- References -- Chapter Fifteen: Intellectual History and Global History -- Westernism and Confucianism -- Diversification -- Connection -- Comparison -- Global concepts -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter Sixteen: Intellectual History and Legal History -- Introduction -- More modern narratives -- The English problem -- The allure of the Ius Commune -- European legal history more generally -- Transnational and global legal history -- Some general comments by way of conclusion -- References -- Chapter Seventeen: The Idea of Secularisation in Intellectual History -- Secularisation and the Church -- Löwith's Meaning in History -- Hans Blumenberg's rejoinder -- Questioning Blumenberg -- Secularisation and the secular: beyond genealogy? -- References -- Further reading -- Part Three: The Practice of Intellectual History -- Chapter Eighteen: Liberty and Law -- Ancients and moderns -- Hobbes, Locke and license -- Rousseau and tyranny -- New tyrannies, new despotisms -- References -- Chapter Nineteen: Education and Manners -- Introduction -- Virtue, politeness and liberty -- Education, civility and progress -- Conclusion -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Twenty: Republics and Monarchies -- Introduction: freedom and modernity -- Venice and the United Provinces: trade republics -- France and Britain: commercial monarchies -- Conclusion: modern politics and 'the problem of the republics' -- References -- Further readinig -- Chapter Twenty-One: Barbarism and Civilisation -- Beginning with the Greeks -- The meaning of 'civilisation' -- Commerce and civility -- John Brown and noble savages.
The example of Russia -- The changing meaning of civilisation -- Civilisation and the state -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Two: Religion Natural and Revealed -- Introduction -- Natural religion -- Revealed religion: history and the Bible -- Philosophy of religion -- Postmodern and post-secular -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Three: Citizenship and Culture -- Introduction: family resemblances -- Norms and facts -- A secular concept -- The two cities -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter Twenty-Four: Democracy and Representation -- Introduction -- The ancient legacy -- Britain between Tradition and Radical Thought -- America and the birth of representative government -- France from the Old Regime to the Revolution -- Conclusion -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Twenty-Five: Religion and Enlightenment -- Introduction -- Religious origins? -- Hobbes and Spinoza -- Jansenists and Augustinians -- Universal values -- Enlightenment and individual faith -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Six: Art and Aesthetics -- Antiquity and modernity -- Between poïesis and aisthēsis -- Art before art history -- The invention of the sensational subject -- Interiority, exteriority and connoisseurship -- The avant-garde and the art of shock -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Seven: Natural Law: Law, Rights and Duties -- Introduction -- The ancient world -- The Middle Ages -- Grotius to Kant -- Modern times -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Eigth: Wars and Empires -- Defining empire -- Imperialism and international relations -- Republics and empires -- Economy and war -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Nine: Reason and Scepticism -- Introduction -- Ancient scepticism -- Renaissance revival and the early modern 'sceptical crisis' -- Secularisation, fideism, and the new science: sceptical reactions to scepticism.
Scepticism in the Enlightenment -- References -- Index -- End User License Agreement.
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Intro -- Title Page -- Table of Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction -- Part One: Approaches to Intellectual History -- Chapter One: The Identity of Intellectual History -- Introduction -- The practice of intellectual history -- 'Read like a critic' -- Intellectual history and the history of disciplines -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter Two: Intellectual History and Historismus in Post-War England -- Introduction: The history of political thought and the history of historiography -- Friedrich Meinecke and Historismus -- Historismus : from historical method to history of historiography -- Conclusion: Historismus and émigré scholarship -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Three: Intellectual History in the Modern University -- Introduction -- The Sussex anomaly -- John Burrow as an intellectual historian -- Burrow and the working intellectual historian -- Conclusion -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Four: Intellectual History and Poststructuralism -- Introduction -- What is poststructuralism? -- Jacques Derrida -- Deconstruction and social history -- New anxieties -- Reaffirming history -- References -- Chapter Five: Intellectual History as Begriffsgeschichte -- Introduction -- Koselleck and the origins of GG -- The content of GG -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter Six: Intellectual History and History of the Book -- Introduction -- Philology and the history of ideas -- Roger Chartier and linguistic history -- Grafton, Jardine, Waszink and Lipsius -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Seven: Michel Foucault and the Genealogy of Power and Knowledge -- Introduction -- Beginnings: From Nietzsche to the birth of archaeology -- The archaeology of the human sciences -- From archaeology to genealogy -- References -- Chapter Eight: Quentin Skinner and the Relevance of Intellectual History -- Introduction.

Defining linguistic contextualism -- Giving substance to the method -- Intellectual history and present politics -- References -- Chapter Nine: J. G. A. Pocock as an Intellectual Historian -- Language and discourse -- The rise and fall of paradigms -- The nature of history -- Situating Pocock -- References -- Part Two: The Discipline of Intellectual History -- Chapter Ten: Intellectual History and the History of Philosophy -- Introduction -- The history of philosophy -- Offshoots from history of philosophy: history of science and history of ideas -- Intellectual history -- Intellectual history and the history of philosophy: Philosophy in History (1984) -- The context of the 'Introduction' in the Philosophy in History (1984) -- The current relationship between intellectual history and history of philosophy -- References -- Chapter Eleven: Intellectual History and the History of Political Thought -- The history of political thought and present politics -- Unspoken assumptions -- Conditions of possibility -- The global turn -- References -- Chapter Twelve: Intellectual History and the History of Science -- The new historical consciousness -- Science and history in the nineteenth century -- The history of science as an academic discipline -- Decline and redefinition -- Kuhn and the history of paradigms -- References -- Chapter Thirteen: Intellectual History and the History of Economics -- Introduction -- Naming the parts, mapping the territory -- Basic predicament -- Self-sufficiency and present-mindedness -- Survival and growth -- Disjunction or conjunction? -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Fourteen: Art History and Intellectual History -- The nature of art history -- Organising, collecting and intellectualisation: art history before 1900 -- Kunstwollen and iconology: art history in the early twentieth century.

Portraiture studies as theology and natural science: physiognomics and identity -- Portraiture studies as history and philosophy: phenomenology and likeness -- Portraiture studies as psychology and sociology: the 'facial society' -- Conclusions -- References -- Chapter Fifteen: Intellectual History and Global History -- Westernism and Confucianism -- Diversification -- Connection -- Comparison -- Global concepts -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter Sixteen: Intellectual History and Legal History -- Introduction -- More modern narratives -- The English problem -- The allure of the Ius Commune -- European legal history more generally -- Transnational and global legal history -- Some general comments by way of conclusion -- References -- Chapter Seventeen: The Idea of Secularisation in Intellectual History -- Secularisation and the Church -- Löwith's Meaning in History -- Hans Blumenberg's rejoinder -- Questioning Blumenberg -- Secularisation and the secular: beyond genealogy? -- References -- Further reading -- Part Three: The Practice of Intellectual History -- Chapter Eighteen: Liberty and Law -- Ancients and moderns -- Hobbes, Locke and license -- Rousseau and tyranny -- New tyrannies, new despotisms -- References -- Chapter Nineteen: Education and Manners -- Introduction -- Virtue, politeness and liberty -- Education, civility and progress -- Conclusion -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Twenty: Republics and Monarchies -- Introduction: freedom and modernity -- Venice and the United Provinces: trade republics -- France and Britain: commercial monarchies -- Conclusion: modern politics and 'the problem of the republics' -- References -- Further readinig -- Chapter Twenty-One: Barbarism and Civilisation -- Beginning with the Greeks -- The meaning of 'civilisation' -- Commerce and civility -- John Brown and noble savages.

The example of Russia -- The changing meaning of civilisation -- Civilisation and the state -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Two: Religion Natural and Revealed -- Introduction -- Natural religion -- Revealed religion: history and the Bible -- Philosophy of religion -- Postmodern and post-secular -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Three: Citizenship and Culture -- Introduction: family resemblances -- Norms and facts -- A secular concept -- The two cities -- Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter Twenty-Four: Democracy and Representation -- Introduction -- The ancient legacy -- Britain between Tradition and Radical Thought -- America and the birth of representative government -- France from the Old Regime to the Revolution -- Conclusion -- References -- Further reading -- Chapter Twenty-Five: Religion and Enlightenment -- Introduction -- Religious origins? -- Hobbes and Spinoza -- Jansenists and Augustinians -- Universal values -- Enlightenment and individual faith -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Six: Art and Aesthetics -- Antiquity and modernity -- Between poïesis and aisthēsis -- Art before art history -- The invention of the sensational subject -- Interiority, exteriority and connoisseurship -- The avant-garde and the art of shock -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Seven: Natural Law: Law, Rights and Duties -- Introduction -- The ancient world -- The Middle Ages -- Grotius to Kant -- Modern times -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Eigth: Wars and Empires -- Defining empire -- Imperialism and international relations -- Republics and empires -- Economy and war -- References -- Chapter Twenty-Nine: Reason and Scepticism -- Introduction -- Ancient scepticism -- Renaissance revival and the early modern 'sceptical crisis' -- Secularisation, fideism, and the new science: sceptical reactions to scepticism.

Scepticism in the Enlightenment -- References -- Index -- End User License Agreement.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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