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Nanophysics and Nanotechnology : An Introduction to Modern Concepts in Nanoscience.

By: Publisher: Berlin : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 3rd edDescription: 1 online resource (420 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9783527684168
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Nanophysics and Nanotechnology : An Introduction to Modern Concepts in NanoscienceDDC classification:
  • 620/.5
LOC classification:
  • QC176.8.N35 -- .W654 2015eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- Related Titles -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Table of Contents -- Dedication -- Preface -- Glossary of Abbreviations -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Nanometers, Micrometers, and Millimeters -- 1.2 Moore's Law -- 1.3 Esaki's Quantum Tunneling Diode -- 1.4 QDs of Many Colors -- 1.5 GMR and TMR 100-1000 Gb Hard Drive "Read Heads" -- 1.6 Accelerometers in Your Car -- 1.7 Nanopore Filters -- 1.8 Nanoscale Elements in Traditional Technologies -- References -- Chapter 2: Systematics of Making Things Smaller, Pre-quantum -- 2.1 Mechanical Frequencies Increase in Small Systems -- 2.2 Scaling Relations Illustrated by a Simple Harmonic Oscillator -- 2.3 Scaling Relations Illustrated by Simple Circuit Elements -- 2.4 Thermal Time Constants and Temperature Differences Decrease -- 2.5 Viscous Forces Become Dominant for Small Particles in Fluid Media -- 2.6 Frictional Forces Can Disappear in Symmetric Molecular Scale Systems -- References -- Chapter 3: What Are Limits to Smallness? -- 3.1 Particle (Quantum) Nature of Matter: Photons, Electrons, Atoms, and Molecules -- 3.2 Biological Examples of Nanomotors and Nanodevices -- 3.3 How Small Can You Make it? -- References -- Chapter 4: Quantum Nature of the Nanoworld -- 4.1 Bohr's Model of Nuclear Atom -- 4.2 Particle-Wave Nature of Light and Matter, DeBroglie Formulas λ = h/p, E = hν -- 4.3 Wavefunction Ψ for Electron, Probability Density Ψ*Ψ, Traveling and Standing Waves -- 4.4 Maxwell's Equations -- E and B as Wavefunctions for Photons, Optical Fiber Modes -- 4.5 The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle -- 4.6 Schrodinger Equation, Quantum States and Energies, Barrier Tunneling -- 4.7 The Hydrogen Atom, One-Electron Atoms, Excitons -- 4.8 Fermions, Bosons, and Occupation Rules -- References -- Chapter 5: Quantum Consequences for the Macroworld -- 5.1 Chemical Table of the Elements.
5.2 Nanosymmetry, Diatoms, and Ferromagnets -- 5.3 More Purely Nanophysical Forces: van der Waals, Casimir, and Hydrogen Bonding -- 5.4 Metals as Boxes of Free Electrons: Fermi Level, DOS, Dimensionality -- 5.5 Periodic Structures (e.g., Si, GaAs, InSb, Cu): Kronig-Penney Model for Electron Bands and Gaps -- 5.6 Electron Bands and Conduction in Semiconductors and Insulators -- Localization versus Delocalization -- 5.7 Hydrogenic Donors and Acceptors -- 5.8 More about Ferromagnetism, the Nanophysical Basis of Disk Memory -- 5.9 Surfaces are Different -- Schottky Barrier Thickness W = [2ϵϵo VB/eND]1/2 -- 5.10 Ferroelectrics, Piezoelectrics, and Pyroelectrics: Recent Applications to Advancing Nanotechnology -- References -- Chapter 6: Self-Assembled Nanostructures in Nature and Industry -- 6.1 Carbon Atom 126C 1s2 2p4 (0.07 nm) -- 6.2 Methane (CH4), Ethane (C2H6), and Octane (C8H18) -- 6.3 Ethylene (C2H4), Benzene (C6H6), and Acetylene (C2H2) -- 6.4 C60 Buckyball (∼0.5 nm) -- 6.5 C∞ Nanotube (∼0.5 nm) -- 6.6 InAs Quantum Dot (∼5 nm) -- 6.7 AgBr Nanocrystal (0.1-2 µm) -- 6.8 Fe3O4 Magnetite and Fe3S4 Greigite Nanoparticles in Magnetotactic Bacteria -- 6.9 Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au and Other Smooth Surfaces -- References -- Chapter 7: Physics-Based Experimental Approaches to Nanofabrication and Nanotechnology -- 7.1 Silicon Technology: The INTEL-IBM Approach to Nanotechnology -- 7.2 Lateral Resolution (Linewidths) Limited by Wavelength of Light, Now 65 nm -- 7.3 Sacrificial Layers, Suspended Bridges, Single-Electron Transistors -- 7.4 What Is the Future of Silicon Computer Technology? -- 7.5 Heat Dissipation and the RSFQ Technology -- 7.6 Scanning Probe (Machine) Methods: One Atom at a Time -- 7.7 STM as Prototype Molecular Assembler -- 7.8 Atomic Force Microscope Arrays -- 7.9 Fundamental Questions: Rates, Accuracy, and More.
7.10 Nanophotonics and Nanoplasmonics -- References -- Chapter 8: Quantum Technologies Based on Magnetism, Electron and Nuclear Spin, and Superconductivity -- 8.1 Spin as an Element of "Quantum Computing" -- 8.2 The Stern-Gerlach Experiment: Observation of Spin-½ Angular Momentum of the Electron -- 8.3 Two Nuclear Spin Effects: MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and the "21.1 cm Line" -- 8.4 Electron Spin ½ as a Qubit for a Quantum Computer: Quantum Superposition, Coherence -- 8.5 Hard and Soft Ferromagnets -- 8.6 The Origins of GMR (Giant Magnetoresistance): Spin-Dependent Scattering of Electrons -- 8.7 The GMR Spin Valve, a Nanophysical Magnetoresistance Sensor -- 8.8 The Tunnel Valve, a Better (TMR) Nanophysical Magnetic Field Sensor -- 8.9 Magnetic Random Access Memory -- 8.10 Spin Injection: The Johnson-Silsbee Effect -- 8.11 Magnetic Logic Devices: A Majority Universal Logic Gate -- 8.12 Superconductors and the Superconducting (Magnetic) Flux Quantum -- 8.13 Josephson Effect and the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) -- 8.14 Superconducting (RSFQ) Logic/Memory Computer Elements -- References -- Chapter 9: Silicon Nanoelectronics and Beyond -- 9.1 Electron Interference Devices with Coherent Electrons -- 9.2 Carbon Nanotube Sensors and Dense Nonvolatile Random Access Memories -- 9.3 Resonant Tunneling Diodes, Tunneling Hot Electron Transistors -- 9.4 Double-Well Potential Charge Qubits -- 9.5 Single Electron Transistors -- 9.6 Experimental Approaches to the Double-Well Charge Qubit -- 9.7 Ion Trap on a GaAs Chip, Pointing to a New Qubit -- 9.8 Quantum Computing by Quantum Annealing with Artificial Spins -- References -- Chapter 10: Nanophysics and Nanotechnology of Graphene -- 10.1 Graphene: Record-Breaking Physical and Electrical Properties -- 10.2 Consequences of One-Atom Thickness: Softness and Adherence.
10.3 Impermeability of Single-Layer Graphene -- 10.4 Synthesis by Chemical Vapor Deposition and Direct Reaction -- 10.5 Application to Flexible, Conducting, and Transparent Electrodes -- 10.6 Potential Application to Computer Logic Devices, Extending Moore's Law -- 10.7 Applications of Graphene within Silicon Technology -- References -- Chapter 11: Looking into the Future -- 11.1 Drexler's Mechanical (Molecular) Axle and Bearing -- 11.2 The Concept of the Molecular Assembler is Flawed -- 11.3 Could Molecular Machines Revolutionize Technology or Even Self-Replicate to Threaten Terrestrial Life? -- 11.4 The Prospect of Radical Abundance by a Breakthrough in Nanoengineering -- 11.5 What about Genetic Engineering and Robotics? -- 11.6 Possible Social and Ethical Implications of Biotechnology and Synthetic Biology -- 11.7 Is there a Posthuman Future as Envisioned by Fukuyama? -- References -- Some Useful Constants -- Exercises -- Index -- End User License Agreement.
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Intro -- Related Titles -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Table of Contents -- Dedication -- Preface -- Glossary of Abbreviations -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Nanometers, Micrometers, and Millimeters -- 1.2 Moore's Law -- 1.3 Esaki's Quantum Tunneling Diode -- 1.4 QDs of Many Colors -- 1.5 GMR and TMR 100-1000 Gb Hard Drive "Read Heads" -- 1.6 Accelerometers in Your Car -- 1.7 Nanopore Filters -- 1.8 Nanoscale Elements in Traditional Technologies -- References -- Chapter 2: Systematics of Making Things Smaller, Pre-quantum -- 2.1 Mechanical Frequencies Increase in Small Systems -- 2.2 Scaling Relations Illustrated by a Simple Harmonic Oscillator -- 2.3 Scaling Relations Illustrated by Simple Circuit Elements -- 2.4 Thermal Time Constants and Temperature Differences Decrease -- 2.5 Viscous Forces Become Dominant for Small Particles in Fluid Media -- 2.6 Frictional Forces Can Disappear in Symmetric Molecular Scale Systems -- References -- Chapter 3: What Are Limits to Smallness? -- 3.1 Particle (Quantum) Nature of Matter: Photons, Electrons, Atoms, and Molecules -- 3.2 Biological Examples of Nanomotors and Nanodevices -- 3.3 How Small Can You Make it? -- References -- Chapter 4: Quantum Nature of the Nanoworld -- 4.1 Bohr's Model of Nuclear Atom -- 4.2 Particle-Wave Nature of Light and Matter, DeBroglie Formulas λ = h/p, E = hν -- 4.3 Wavefunction Ψ for Electron, Probability Density Ψ*Ψ, Traveling and Standing Waves -- 4.4 Maxwell's Equations -- E and B as Wavefunctions for Photons, Optical Fiber Modes -- 4.5 The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle -- 4.6 Schrodinger Equation, Quantum States and Energies, Barrier Tunneling -- 4.7 The Hydrogen Atom, One-Electron Atoms, Excitons -- 4.8 Fermions, Bosons, and Occupation Rules -- References -- Chapter 5: Quantum Consequences for the Macroworld -- 5.1 Chemical Table of the Elements.

5.2 Nanosymmetry, Diatoms, and Ferromagnets -- 5.3 More Purely Nanophysical Forces: van der Waals, Casimir, and Hydrogen Bonding -- 5.4 Metals as Boxes of Free Electrons: Fermi Level, DOS, Dimensionality -- 5.5 Periodic Structures (e.g., Si, GaAs, InSb, Cu): Kronig-Penney Model for Electron Bands and Gaps -- 5.6 Electron Bands and Conduction in Semiconductors and Insulators -- Localization versus Delocalization -- 5.7 Hydrogenic Donors and Acceptors -- 5.8 More about Ferromagnetism, the Nanophysical Basis of Disk Memory -- 5.9 Surfaces are Different -- Schottky Barrier Thickness W = [2ϵϵo VB/eND]1/2 -- 5.10 Ferroelectrics, Piezoelectrics, and Pyroelectrics: Recent Applications to Advancing Nanotechnology -- References -- Chapter 6: Self-Assembled Nanostructures in Nature and Industry -- 6.1 Carbon Atom 126C 1s2 2p4 (0.07 nm) -- 6.2 Methane (CH4), Ethane (C2H6), and Octane (C8H18) -- 6.3 Ethylene (C2H4), Benzene (C6H6), and Acetylene (C2H2) -- 6.4 C60 Buckyball (∼0.5 nm) -- 6.5 C∞ Nanotube (∼0.5 nm) -- 6.6 InAs Quantum Dot (∼5 nm) -- 6.7 AgBr Nanocrystal (0.1-2 µm) -- 6.8 Fe3O4 Magnetite and Fe3S4 Greigite Nanoparticles in Magnetotactic Bacteria -- 6.9 Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au and Other Smooth Surfaces -- References -- Chapter 7: Physics-Based Experimental Approaches to Nanofabrication and Nanotechnology -- 7.1 Silicon Technology: The INTEL-IBM Approach to Nanotechnology -- 7.2 Lateral Resolution (Linewidths) Limited by Wavelength of Light, Now 65 nm -- 7.3 Sacrificial Layers, Suspended Bridges, Single-Electron Transistors -- 7.4 What Is the Future of Silicon Computer Technology? -- 7.5 Heat Dissipation and the RSFQ Technology -- 7.6 Scanning Probe (Machine) Methods: One Atom at a Time -- 7.7 STM as Prototype Molecular Assembler -- 7.8 Atomic Force Microscope Arrays -- 7.9 Fundamental Questions: Rates, Accuracy, and More.

7.10 Nanophotonics and Nanoplasmonics -- References -- Chapter 8: Quantum Technologies Based on Magnetism, Electron and Nuclear Spin, and Superconductivity -- 8.1 Spin as an Element of "Quantum Computing" -- 8.2 The Stern-Gerlach Experiment: Observation of Spin-½ Angular Momentum of the Electron -- 8.3 Two Nuclear Spin Effects: MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and the "21.1 cm Line" -- 8.4 Electron Spin ½ as a Qubit for a Quantum Computer: Quantum Superposition, Coherence -- 8.5 Hard and Soft Ferromagnets -- 8.6 The Origins of GMR (Giant Magnetoresistance): Spin-Dependent Scattering of Electrons -- 8.7 The GMR Spin Valve, a Nanophysical Magnetoresistance Sensor -- 8.8 The Tunnel Valve, a Better (TMR) Nanophysical Magnetic Field Sensor -- 8.9 Magnetic Random Access Memory -- 8.10 Spin Injection: The Johnson-Silsbee Effect -- 8.11 Magnetic Logic Devices: A Majority Universal Logic Gate -- 8.12 Superconductors and the Superconducting (Magnetic) Flux Quantum -- 8.13 Josephson Effect and the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) -- 8.14 Superconducting (RSFQ) Logic/Memory Computer Elements -- References -- Chapter 9: Silicon Nanoelectronics and Beyond -- 9.1 Electron Interference Devices with Coherent Electrons -- 9.2 Carbon Nanotube Sensors and Dense Nonvolatile Random Access Memories -- 9.3 Resonant Tunneling Diodes, Tunneling Hot Electron Transistors -- 9.4 Double-Well Potential Charge Qubits -- 9.5 Single Electron Transistors -- 9.6 Experimental Approaches to the Double-Well Charge Qubit -- 9.7 Ion Trap on a GaAs Chip, Pointing to a New Qubit -- 9.8 Quantum Computing by Quantum Annealing with Artificial Spins -- References -- Chapter 10: Nanophysics and Nanotechnology of Graphene -- 10.1 Graphene: Record-Breaking Physical and Electrical Properties -- 10.2 Consequences of One-Atom Thickness: Softness and Adherence.

10.3 Impermeability of Single-Layer Graphene -- 10.4 Synthesis by Chemical Vapor Deposition and Direct Reaction -- 10.5 Application to Flexible, Conducting, and Transparent Electrodes -- 10.6 Potential Application to Computer Logic Devices, Extending Moore's Law -- 10.7 Applications of Graphene within Silicon Technology -- References -- Chapter 11: Looking into the Future -- 11.1 Drexler's Mechanical (Molecular) Axle and Bearing -- 11.2 The Concept of the Molecular Assembler is Flawed -- 11.3 Could Molecular Machines Revolutionize Technology or Even Self-Replicate to Threaten Terrestrial Life? -- 11.4 The Prospect of Radical Abundance by a Breakthrough in Nanoengineering -- 11.5 What about Genetic Engineering and Robotics? -- 11.6 Possible Social and Ethical Implications of Biotechnology and Synthetic Biology -- 11.7 Is there a Posthuman Future as Envisioned by Fukuyama? -- References -- Some Useful Constants -- Exercises -- Index -- End User License Agreement.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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