A Companion to Kierkegaard.

By: Stewart, JonSeries: Blackwell Companions to Philosophy SerPublisher: New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (542 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781118783573Subject(s): Philosophy, Modern - 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Companion to KierkegaardDDC classification: 198.9 LOC classification: BX4827.K5 -- .C667 2015ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Chronology of Kierkegaard's Works -- List of Abbreviations -- Editor's Introduction: Kierkegaard and the Rich Field of Kierkegaard Studies -- The Subject Areas of Kierkegaard Studies Today -- The Methodological Approaches in Kierkegaard Studies Today -- The Organization and Strategy of this Book -- References -- Part I Philosophy -- A. Sources -- Chapter 1 A Shimmering Socrates: Philosophy and Poetry in Kierkegaard's Platonic Authorship -- 1.1 Socrates in The Concept of Irony -- 1.2 Shades of Socrates: Either/Or and Fear and Trembling -- 1.3 Socrates as Faithful Philosopher: Fragments and Postscript -- 1.4 A Brief Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 2 Kierkegaard's Use of German Philosophy: Leibniz to Fichte -- 2.1 Leibniz: Modality, Freedom, and Faith -- 2.2 The Pantheism Controversy: Jacobi, Lessing, and the Leap -- 2.3 Kant's "Honest Way" -- 2.4 J.G. Fichte: Subjectivity, Imagination, and Ethics -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 3 Kierkegaard's View of Hegel, His Followers and Critics -- 3.1 G.W.F. Hegel -- 3.2 The Right Hegelians: Marheineke, Daub, Erdmann, Rosenkranz, Hotho, Werder -- 3.3 The Left Hegelians: Feuerbach, Bruno Bauer, Strauss -- 3.4 The Hegel Critics: Baader, I.H. Fichte, Schopenhauer, Trendelenburg, Schelling -- 3.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 4 Kierkegaard's Relations to Danish Philosophy of the Golden Age -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 5 Kierkegaard and Existentialism: From Anxiety to Autonomy -- 5.1 The Kierkegaardian Self as Synthesis -- 5.2 The Unintegrated Self and Kierkegaardian Despair -- 5.3 The Unintegrated Self and Sartrean Bad Faith -- 5.4 Kierkegaardian Anxiety -- 5.5 Anxiety in the Existential Tradition.
5.6 Kierkegaard on the Look of the Other -- 5.7 Sartre and the Vulnerability of Being Looked At -- 5.8 Kierkegaard and the Divine Other -- 5.9 Kierkegaard and Autonomous Dependence -- 5.10 Autonomous Autonomy among Existentialists -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 6 Postmodernism and Deconstruction: Paradox, Sacrifice, and the Future of Writing -- 6.1 Deconstruction vs. Postmodernism -- 6.2 Repetition -- 6.3 Writing and Subjectivity -- 6.4 Aufhebung and Deconstruction -- 6.5 Sacrifice of the Other -- 6.6 The Promise -- Cross-references -- References -- C. Concepts and Contributions -- Chapter 7 Kierkegaard's Views on Normative Ethics, Moral Agency, and Metaethics -- 7.1 Normative Ethics: Virtue Ethics, Deontology, and Beyond -- 7.2 Moral Agency and Moral Psychology: Selfhood and Despair -- 7.3 The Source of Moral Obligations: Moral Constructivism, Realism, and Theological Voluntarism -- 7.4 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 8 Kierkegaard's Skepticism -- 8.1 The Limits of Knowledge -- 8.2 The Idea of a New Science -- 8.3 The Categories of Becoming -- 8.4 Subjective Truth and the Content of Christian Faith -- Cross-references -- References -- Part II Theology and Religious Studies -- A. Sources -- Chapter 9 Kierkegaard and Biblical Studies: A Critical Response to Nineteenth-Century Hermeneutics -- 9.1 Kierkegaard's Critique of Contemporary Interpretive Traditions -- 9.2 Kierkegaard's Hermeneutic Alternative -- 9.3 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- References -- Chapter 10 Grace and Rigor in Kierkegaard's Reception of the Church Fathers -- 10.1 The Fathers and the Incarnation in Kierkegaard -- 10.2 Sin and Grace in Kierkegaard's Treatment of the Fathers -- 10.3 Christian Rigor and Compromise with the World -- 10.4 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Note -- References.
Chapter 11 Kierkegaard's Mystical and Spiritual Sources: Meister Eckhart to Tersteegen -- 11.1 Rheno-Flemish Mysticism and Devotio Moderna -- 11.2 Post-Reformation Catholic and Reformed Spiritual Literature -- 11.3 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 12 Kierkegaard's Appropriation and Critique of Luther and Lutheranism -- 12.1 Justification by Grace and the Anguished Conscience -- 12.2 The Third Use of the Law -- 12.3 Incarnation and Kenosis -- 12.4 The Church and the Civil Order -- 12.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- References -- Chapter 13 Shapers of Kierkegaard's Danish Church: Mynster, Grundtvig, Martensen -- 13.1 Beginnings -- 13.2 Jacob Peter Mynster -- 13.3 Nicolai Frederik Severin Grundtvig -- 13.4 Hans Lassen Martensen -- 13.5 Endings -- Cross-references -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 14 From Barth to Tillich: Kierkegaard and the Dialectical Theologians -- 14.1 Karl Barth (1886-1968) -- 14.2 Emil Brunner (1889-1966) -- 14.3 Rudolf Bultmann (1884-1976) -- 14.4 Paul Tillich (1886-1965) -- 14.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 15 Other Lutheran Theologians Responding Contextually to Kierkegaard -- 15.1 German National Lutheran Theologians -- 15.2 Scandinavian Lutheran Theologians -- 15.3 Contemporary German Lutheran Theologians -- 15.4 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Note -- References -- Chapter 16 Catholicism: Finding Inspiration and Provocation in Kierkegaard -- 16.1 "Catholicism" in Kierkegaard's Authorship -- 16.2 The Catholic Reception of Kierkegaard -- 16.3 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- C. Concepts and Contributions -- Chapter 17 Kierkegaard as Existentialist Dogmatician: Kierkegaard on Systematic Theology, Doctrine, and Dogmatics -- 17.1 Systematic Theology -- 17.2 Doctrine -- 17.3 Dogmatics.
17.4 Conclusion: Kierkegaard as "Dogmatician" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 18 Biblical Variations: Kierkegaard's Rewritten "Life of Jesus" -- 18.1 Philosophical Fragments: Is an Algebraic Little Announcement "more than enough"? -- 18.2 Practice in Christianity: This is "the story of his life. It can be told in more than one way" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 19 Rethinking Religion Existentially: New Approaches to Classical Problems of Religious Philosophy in Kierkegaard -- 19.1 Kierkegaard: A Classic of the Philosophy of Religion? -- 19.2 Faith beyond the Limits of Pure Reason: Is Kierkegaardian Faith Irrational? -- 19.3 "The Unknown": Apophatical Theology and Negative Dialectic in Kierkegaard's Thinking -- 19.4 "Tremble, because you are immortal" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Part III Aesthetics, the Arts, and Literary Theory -- A. Sources -- Chapter 20 Kierkegaard's Use of German Literature -- 20.1 The Older Generations: Lessing, Hamann, Lichtenberg, and Goethe -- 20.2 Kierkegaard's Criticism of Romantic Irony -- 20.3 Other German Contemporaries -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 21 Kierkegaard and the Aesthetics of the Danish Golden Age -- 21.1 Aesthetics and The Danish Golden Age -- 21.2 Kierkegaard and Heiberg -- 21.3 Kierkegaard's Departure from Heiberg … A New Aesthetics? -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 22 Literature and (Anti-)Humanism -- 22.1 Kierkegaard's Existential Story in a World of Intertextuality -- 22.2 Creative Writing in Kierkegaard's Wake -- 22.3 Kierkegaard's Existential Story between Humanism and Anti-Humanism -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 23 Kierkegaard's Influence on Literary Criticism and Theory: Irony, Repetition, Silence -- 23.1 Irony -- 23.2 Repetition -- 23.3 Silence.
23.4 In Conclusion: Exceptions -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- C.Concepts and Contributions -- Chapter 24 Existence and the Aesthetic Forms -- 24.1 Critic of Aesthetic Culture -- 24.2 The Requalification of Sensuality -- 24.3 The "Representative" Relation -- 24.4 The Drama of Seduction -- Cross-references -- References -- Chapter 25 Kierkegaard's Theatrical Aesthetic from Repetition to Imitation -- 25.1 A Comment on "Performance" and "Theatrics" -- 25.2 "An Actor Against His Will": Kierkegaard's Theatrical Age -- 25.3 The Theatricality of Repetition, Reflection, and Recollection -- 25.4 The Theatrics of Character and Imitation -- 25.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Part IV Social Sciences and Politics -- A. Sources -- Chapter 26 Politics, Society, and Theology in Golden Age Denmark: Key Themes and Figures -- 26.1 1848 -- 26.2 Martensen -- 26.3 Grundtvig -- 26.4 History -- 26.5 The Moment -- 26.6 Identity -- 26.7 The Common Man -- 26.8 The Individual -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 27 Reflections on Late Modernity: Kierkegaard in the "Present Age" -- 27.1 The Teleological Demotion of the Religious -- 27.2 Mobilizing the Pseudonyms -- 27.3 Kierkegaard's Account of the "Present Age" -- 27.4 How the "Present Age" Ends -- 27.5 The "Unrecognizable One" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 28 Between Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology: The Insider/Outsider Self -- 28.1 Kierkegaard between the Lines -- 28.2 …Between Psychologies… -- 28.3 …Between Anthropology and Sociology… -- 28.4 The Insider/Outsider Self: Kierkegaard's Reception between the Lines -- 28.5 Conclusions: Reading Kierkegaard as Insider/Outsider -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 29 Kierkegaard's Social-Political Posterity: A Still Unnavigated Maze -- 29.1 The Left-Wing Collage.
29.2 The Feminist Milieu.
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Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Chronology of Kierkegaard's Works -- List of Abbreviations -- Editor's Introduction: Kierkegaard and the Rich Field of Kierkegaard Studies -- The Subject Areas of Kierkegaard Studies Today -- The Methodological Approaches in Kierkegaard Studies Today -- The Organization and Strategy of this Book -- References -- Part I Philosophy -- A. Sources -- Chapter 1 A Shimmering Socrates: Philosophy and Poetry in Kierkegaard's Platonic Authorship -- 1.1 Socrates in The Concept of Irony -- 1.2 Shades of Socrates: Either/Or and Fear and Trembling -- 1.3 Socrates as Faithful Philosopher: Fragments and Postscript -- 1.4 A Brief Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 2 Kierkegaard's Use of German Philosophy: Leibniz to Fichte -- 2.1 Leibniz: Modality, Freedom, and Faith -- 2.2 The Pantheism Controversy: Jacobi, Lessing, and the Leap -- 2.3 Kant's "Honest Way" -- 2.4 J.G. Fichte: Subjectivity, Imagination, and Ethics -- 2.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 3 Kierkegaard's View of Hegel, His Followers and Critics -- 3.1 G.W.F. Hegel -- 3.2 The Right Hegelians: Marheineke, Daub, Erdmann, Rosenkranz, Hotho, Werder -- 3.3 The Left Hegelians: Feuerbach, Bruno Bauer, Strauss -- 3.4 The Hegel Critics: Baader, I.H. Fichte, Schopenhauer, Trendelenburg, Schelling -- 3.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 4 Kierkegaard's Relations to Danish Philosophy of the Golden Age -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 5 Kierkegaard and Existentialism: From Anxiety to Autonomy -- 5.1 The Kierkegaardian Self as Synthesis -- 5.2 The Unintegrated Self and Kierkegaardian Despair -- 5.3 The Unintegrated Self and Sartrean Bad Faith -- 5.4 Kierkegaardian Anxiety -- 5.5 Anxiety in the Existential Tradition.

5.6 Kierkegaard on the Look of the Other -- 5.7 Sartre and the Vulnerability of Being Looked At -- 5.8 Kierkegaard and the Divine Other -- 5.9 Kierkegaard and Autonomous Dependence -- 5.10 Autonomous Autonomy among Existentialists -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 6 Postmodernism and Deconstruction: Paradox, Sacrifice, and the Future of Writing -- 6.1 Deconstruction vs. Postmodernism -- 6.2 Repetition -- 6.3 Writing and Subjectivity -- 6.4 Aufhebung and Deconstruction -- 6.5 Sacrifice of the Other -- 6.6 The Promise -- Cross-references -- References -- C. Concepts and Contributions -- Chapter 7 Kierkegaard's Views on Normative Ethics, Moral Agency, and Metaethics -- 7.1 Normative Ethics: Virtue Ethics, Deontology, and Beyond -- 7.2 Moral Agency and Moral Psychology: Selfhood and Despair -- 7.3 The Source of Moral Obligations: Moral Constructivism, Realism, and Theological Voluntarism -- 7.4 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 8 Kierkegaard's Skepticism -- 8.1 The Limits of Knowledge -- 8.2 The Idea of a New Science -- 8.3 The Categories of Becoming -- 8.4 Subjective Truth and the Content of Christian Faith -- Cross-references -- References -- Part II Theology and Religious Studies -- A. Sources -- Chapter 9 Kierkegaard and Biblical Studies: A Critical Response to Nineteenth-Century Hermeneutics -- 9.1 Kierkegaard's Critique of Contemporary Interpretive Traditions -- 9.2 Kierkegaard's Hermeneutic Alternative -- 9.3 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- References -- Chapter 10 Grace and Rigor in Kierkegaard's Reception of the Church Fathers -- 10.1 The Fathers and the Incarnation in Kierkegaard -- 10.2 Sin and Grace in Kierkegaard's Treatment of the Fathers -- 10.3 Christian Rigor and Compromise with the World -- 10.4 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Note -- References.

Chapter 11 Kierkegaard's Mystical and Spiritual Sources: Meister Eckhart to Tersteegen -- 11.1 Rheno-Flemish Mysticism and Devotio Moderna -- 11.2 Post-Reformation Catholic and Reformed Spiritual Literature -- 11.3 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 12 Kierkegaard's Appropriation and Critique of Luther and Lutheranism -- 12.1 Justification by Grace and the Anguished Conscience -- 12.2 The Third Use of the Law -- 12.3 Incarnation and Kenosis -- 12.4 The Church and the Civil Order -- 12.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- References -- Chapter 13 Shapers of Kierkegaard's Danish Church: Mynster, Grundtvig, Martensen -- 13.1 Beginnings -- 13.2 Jacob Peter Mynster -- 13.3 Nicolai Frederik Severin Grundtvig -- 13.4 Hans Lassen Martensen -- 13.5 Endings -- Cross-references -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 14 From Barth to Tillich: Kierkegaard and the Dialectical Theologians -- 14.1 Karl Barth (1886-1968) -- 14.2 Emil Brunner (1889-1966) -- 14.3 Rudolf Bultmann (1884-1976) -- 14.4 Paul Tillich (1886-1965) -- 14.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 15 Other Lutheran Theologians Responding Contextually to Kierkegaard -- 15.1 German National Lutheran Theologians -- 15.2 Scandinavian Lutheran Theologians -- 15.3 Contemporary German Lutheran Theologians -- 15.4 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Note -- References -- Chapter 16 Catholicism: Finding Inspiration and Provocation in Kierkegaard -- 16.1 "Catholicism" in Kierkegaard's Authorship -- 16.2 The Catholic Reception of Kierkegaard -- 16.3 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- C. Concepts and Contributions -- Chapter 17 Kierkegaard as Existentialist Dogmatician: Kierkegaard on Systematic Theology, Doctrine, and Dogmatics -- 17.1 Systematic Theology -- 17.2 Doctrine -- 17.3 Dogmatics.

17.4 Conclusion: Kierkegaard as "Dogmatician" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 18 Biblical Variations: Kierkegaard's Rewritten "Life of Jesus" -- 18.1 Philosophical Fragments: Is an Algebraic Little Announcement "more than enough"? -- 18.2 Practice in Christianity: This is "the story of his life. It can be told in more than one way" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 19 Rethinking Religion Existentially: New Approaches to Classical Problems of Religious Philosophy in Kierkegaard -- 19.1 Kierkegaard: A Classic of the Philosophy of Religion? -- 19.2 Faith beyond the Limits of Pure Reason: Is Kierkegaardian Faith Irrational? -- 19.3 "The Unknown": Apophatical Theology and Negative Dialectic in Kierkegaard's Thinking -- 19.4 "Tremble, because you are immortal" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Part III Aesthetics, the Arts, and Literary Theory -- A. Sources -- Chapter 20 Kierkegaard's Use of German Literature -- 20.1 The Older Generations: Lessing, Hamann, Lichtenberg, and Goethe -- 20.2 Kierkegaard's Criticism of Romantic Irony -- 20.3 Other German Contemporaries -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 21 Kierkegaard and the Aesthetics of the Danish Golden Age -- 21.1 Aesthetics and The Danish Golden Age -- 21.2 Kierkegaard and Heiberg -- 21.3 Kierkegaard's Departure from Heiberg … A New Aesthetics? -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 22 Literature and (Anti-)Humanism -- 22.1 Kierkegaard's Existential Story in a World of Intertextuality -- 22.2 Creative Writing in Kierkegaard's Wake -- 22.3 Kierkegaard's Existential Story between Humanism and Anti-Humanism -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 23 Kierkegaard's Influence on Literary Criticism and Theory: Irony, Repetition, Silence -- 23.1 Irony -- 23.2 Repetition -- 23.3 Silence.

23.4 In Conclusion: Exceptions -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- C.Concepts and Contributions -- Chapter 24 Existence and the Aesthetic Forms -- 24.1 Critic of Aesthetic Culture -- 24.2 The Requalification of Sensuality -- 24.3 The "Representative" Relation -- 24.4 The Drama of Seduction -- Cross-references -- References -- Chapter 25 Kierkegaard's Theatrical Aesthetic from Repetition to Imitation -- 25.1 A Comment on "Performance" and "Theatrics" -- 25.2 "An Actor Against His Will": Kierkegaard's Theatrical Age -- 25.3 The Theatricality of Repetition, Reflection, and Recollection -- 25.4 The Theatrics of Character and Imitation -- 25.5 Conclusion -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Part IV Social Sciences and Politics -- A. Sources -- Chapter 26 Politics, Society, and Theology in Golden Age Denmark: Key Themes and Figures -- 26.1 1848 -- 26.2 Martensen -- 26.3 Grundtvig -- 26.4 History -- 26.5 The Moment -- 26.6 Identity -- 26.7 The Common Man -- 26.8 The Individual -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 27 Reflections on Late Modernity: Kierkegaard in the "Present Age" -- 27.1 The Teleological Demotion of the Religious -- 27.2 Mobilizing the Pseudonyms -- 27.3 Kierkegaard's Account of the "Present Age" -- 27.4 How the "Present Age" Ends -- 27.5 The "Unrecognizable One" -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- B. Reception -- Chapter 28 Between Anthropology, Sociology, and Psychology: The Insider/Outsider Self -- 28.1 Kierkegaard between the Lines -- 28.2 …Between Psychologies… -- 28.3 …Between Anthropology and Sociology… -- 28.4 The Insider/Outsider Self: Kierkegaard's Reception between the Lines -- 28.5 Conclusions: Reading Kierkegaard as Insider/Outsider -- Cross-references -- Notes -- References -- Chapter 29 Kierkegaard's Social-Political Posterity: A Still Unnavigated Maze -- 29.1 The Left-Wing Collage.

29.2 The Feminist Milieu.

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