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A Companion to Locke.

By: Series: Blackwell Companions to Philosophy SerPublisher: Chicester : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (560 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781118328798
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Companion to LockeDDC classification:
  • 192
LOC classification:
  • B1297 -- .C667 2016eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- Blackwell Companions to Philosophy -- Titlepage -- Copyright -- Notes on Contributors -- References to Locke's Works -- Introduction -- Life and Background -- Metaphysics and Epistemology -- Government, Ethics, and Society -- Religion -- Locke's Legacy -- References -- Part I: Life and Background -- Chapter 1: Locke's Life -- 1.1 Early Years, 1632-1652 -- 1.2 Oxford, 1652-1667 -- 1.3 Shaftesbury's "Assistant Pen," 1667-1675 -- 1.4 France, 1675-1679 -- 1.5 Whig Politics, 1679-1683 -- 1.6 Exile, 1683-1689 -- 1.7 The Revolution, 1689-1690 -- 1.8 Publication, 1689-1699 -- 1.9 Court Whig and the Board of Trade, 1695-1700 -- 1.10 Last Years, 1700-1704 -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 2: The Contexts of Locke's Political Thought -- 2.1 The Politics of Memory -- 2.2 The Politics of Religion -- 2.3 Partisanship and the Public Sphere -- 2.4 British and Irish Contexts -- 2.5 European Contexts -- 2.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: Locke and Natural Philosophy -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Medicine and Chymistry -- 3.3 Experimental Philosophy -- 3.4 Locke and Speculative Philosophy -- 3.5 Demonstrative Knowledge and the Knowledge of Nature -- 3.6 Mathematics and a Corpuscular Metric -- 3.7 Locke and Newton -- 3.8 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 4: Locke and Scholasticism -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The Oxford Curriculum -- 4.3 Locke's Acquaintance with Scholasticism -- 4.4 Metaphysics (1): Being -- 4.5 Metaphysics (2): Substance -- 4.6 Logic: Syllogistic and Demonstration -- 4.7 Language (1): Basic Notions -- 4.8 Language (2): Signs and Signification -- 4.9 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 5: Locke and Descartes -- 5.1 Introduction: Locke's Engagement with Descartes -- 5.2 Locke's Anti-innatism as Anti-Cartesianism: The Idea of Infinity -- 5.3 Locke Contra Cartesian Ontology.
5.4 Lockean Ontology and Method in a Cartesian Context -- Note -- References -- Further Reading -- Part II: Metaphysics and Epistemology -- Chapter 6: The Genesis and Composition of the ESSAY -- 6.1 The Early Drafts: Draft A -- 6.2 The Early Drafts: Draft B -- 6.3 Work in Progress, 1671-1685 -- 6.4 Draft C (1685) -- 6.5 First Publication: the Abrégé -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 7: The Theory of Ideas -- 7.1 What Are Ideas? -- 7.2 Simple and Complex Ideas -- 7.3 Mental Operations -- 7.4 Representation -- 7.5 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 8: Locke's Critique of Innatism -- 8.1 Varieties of Dispositional Nativism -- 8.2 Locke's Overall Critique of Innatism -- 8.3 Assessing Locke's Arguments -- 8.4 Conclusion: Locke's Real Challenge -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 9: Locke on Perception -- 9.1 General Considerations on Sensation -- 9.2 Visual Perception of Shape -- 9.3 Perception and Time -- Note -- References -- Chapter 10: Primary and Secondary Qualities -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Context -- 10.3 Location -- 10.4 Structure -- 10.5 Locke's view -- 10.6 The "Berkeleyan interpretation" of Locke -- 10.7 Resemblance Revisited -- 10.8 Qualities and Powers -- 10.9 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 11: Locke on Essence and the Social Construction of Kinds -- 11.1 Stages in Kind Creation -- 11.2 The Simplicity and Strength of Locke's Story -- 11.3 Are There Real Essences of Kinds or Species? -- 11.4 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 12: Locke's Theory of Identity -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Easy Cases: God, Finite Intelligences, Atoms, and Masses -- 12.3 A Less Easy but More Interesting Case: Organisms -- 12.4 A Problem about Coincidence -- 12.5 The Least Easy but Most Interesting Case: Persons -- 12.6 Locke against Substance-Based Theories of Personal Identity.
12.7 Getting Away with Murder? -- 12.8 Two Famous Objections: The Circularity Objection and the Transitivity Objection -- 12.9 The Transitivity Objection -- 12.10 Attempts to Save Locke from the Transitivity Problem -- 12.11 Conclusion: The Silver Lining -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 13: Liberty and Suspension in Locke's Theory of the Will -- 13.1 Locke's Key Concepts -- 13.2 Locke's Key Doctrines -- 13.3 "Motivational Determinism" and the "Elusive Something" -- 13.4 Just Punishment, Intellectual Freedom, and Freedom to Will -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 14: Language and Meaning -- 14.1 Some Methodological Preliminaries -- 14.2 Locke on Language, Thought, and Linguistic Signification -- 14.3 Linguistic Communication and the Problem of Privacy -- 14.4 Locke on General Terms and Abstraction -- 14.5 Propositions and particles -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 15: Locke on Knowledge and Belief -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 The Varieties of Knowledge -- 15.3 The Two Demonstrative Sciences -- 15.4 "The Twilight … of Probability" -- 15.5 The Regulation of Assent -- 15.6 Practical Advice on Improving One's Opinions -- 15.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 16: Sensitive Knowledge: Locke on Skepticism and Sensation -- 16.1 Definitions and Distinctions -- 16.2 The nature of sensitive knowledge -- 16.3 Pleasure, Pain, and Certainty "As Great as Our Happiness, or Misery" -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 17: Locke on Thinking Matter -- 17.1 The Uncertain Nature of Thinking Substance -- 17.2 Mechanism and The Possibility of Thinking Matter -- 17.3 The Intelligence and Immateriality of God -- 17.4 Divine Superaddition -- References -- Chapter 18: The Correspondence with Stillingfleet -- 18.1 The Origins of the Controversy -- 18.2 Locke's First Letter -- 18.3 Stillingfleet's First Answer -- 18.4 Locke's Second Letter.
18.5 Stillingfleet's Second Answer -- 18.6 Locke's Third Letter -- References -- Further Reading -- Part III: Government, Ethics, and Society -- Chapter 19: Locke on the Law of Nature and Natural Rights -- 19.1 Locke's "Potter-God" -- 19.2 Concurrent Univocal Property -- 19.3 Divine Versus Human Workmanship and Self-Ownership -- 19.4 "Nesting" Property, The Law of Nature, and Natural Rights -- 19.5 Slavery and Suicide -- 19.6 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 20: Locke on Property and Money -- 20.1 Introduction -- 20.2 The Nature and Extent of Lockean Property -- 20.3 The Labor Theory of Appropriation -- 20.4 Money and the Origins of Inequality -- 20.5 From Money to Political Society -- 20.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 21: Locke on the Social Contract -- 21.1 Locke and Social Contract Theory -- 21.2 The State of Nature -- 21.3 Locke's Social Contract -- 21.4 Limits on and Forms of Consent -- 21.5 Government -- Further Reading -- Chapter 22: Locke on Toleration -- 22.1 The Historical Context -- 22.2 The Two Tracts -- 22.3 An Essay Concerning Toleration and Epistola de Tolerantia -- 22.4 The Later Letters on Toleration -- 22.5 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 23: Locke on Education -- 23.1 Some Thoughts Concerning Education -- 23.2 Of the Conduct of the Understanding -- 23.3 Interpretive Issues -- 23.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part IV: Religion -- Chapter 24: Locke's Philosophy of Religion -- 24.1 Introduction -- 24.2 Arguments for the Existence and Unity of God -- 24.3 The Ladder of Being: Man's Place in the World -- 24.4 The Problem of Evil: God's Goodness and Justice and Human Limitation and Knowledge -- 24.5 Reason and Faith, Revelation and Miracles -- 24.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 25: The Reasonableness of Christianity and A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St Paul.
25.1 Introduction -- 25.2 The Reasonableness of Christianity -- 25.3 A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St Paul -- 25.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part V: Locke's Legacy -- Chapter 26: Locke and British Empiricism -- 26.1 Lockean Apparatus -- 26.2 Demonstrative Knowledge -- 26.3 Hume and Locke's Restrictions on the Third Degree of Knowledge -- 26.4 Association and Custom -- 26.5 Hume's Meaning Empiricism Reconsidered -- 26.6 Meaning Empiricism and Cartesian Metaphysics in Berkeley -- 26.7 Epistemic Priority and Reification -- 26.8 The External World and Inference to the Best Explanation -- 26.9 Enumerative Induction and a Revived Explanationism -- 26.10 Nativism and Basic Beliefs in External Objects -- 26.11 Berkeley's Influence on Hume -- References -- Chapter 27: Locke and the Liberal Tradition -- 27.1 Natural Law and Natural Moral Rights -- 27.2 Theology and Ethics -- 27.3 Consent -- 27.4 The Family -- 27.5 Property -- 27.6 Limited Government and the Right to Rebel -- 27.7 Three Conceptions of Liberalism -- References -- Chapter 28: Locke and America -- 28.1 Postcolonial Locke -- 28.2 Governing America -- 28.3 Anthropology and Moral Philosophy -- 28.4 Theories of Empire -- 28.5 The Agriculturist Argument -- 28.6 Colonial Legacies -- 28.7 Slavery -- 28.8 Constraining Empire -- References -- Index -- EULA.
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Intro -- Blackwell Companions to Philosophy -- Titlepage -- Copyright -- Notes on Contributors -- References to Locke's Works -- Introduction -- Life and Background -- Metaphysics and Epistemology -- Government, Ethics, and Society -- Religion -- Locke's Legacy -- References -- Part I: Life and Background -- Chapter 1: Locke's Life -- 1.1 Early Years, 1632-1652 -- 1.2 Oxford, 1652-1667 -- 1.3 Shaftesbury's "Assistant Pen," 1667-1675 -- 1.4 France, 1675-1679 -- 1.5 Whig Politics, 1679-1683 -- 1.6 Exile, 1683-1689 -- 1.7 The Revolution, 1689-1690 -- 1.8 Publication, 1689-1699 -- 1.9 Court Whig and the Board of Trade, 1695-1700 -- 1.10 Last Years, 1700-1704 -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 2: The Contexts of Locke's Political Thought -- 2.1 The Politics of Memory -- 2.2 The Politics of Religion -- 2.3 Partisanship and the Public Sphere -- 2.4 British and Irish Contexts -- 2.5 European Contexts -- 2.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: Locke and Natural Philosophy -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Medicine and Chymistry -- 3.3 Experimental Philosophy -- 3.4 Locke and Speculative Philosophy -- 3.5 Demonstrative Knowledge and the Knowledge of Nature -- 3.6 Mathematics and a Corpuscular Metric -- 3.7 Locke and Newton -- 3.8 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 4: Locke and Scholasticism -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 The Oxford Curriculum -- 4.3 Locke's Acquaintance with Scholasticism -- 4.4 Metaphysics (1): Being -- 4.5 Metaphysics (2): Substance -- 4.6 Logic: Syllogistic and Demonstration -- 4.7 Language (1): Basic Notions -- 4.8 Language (2): Signs and Signification -- 4.9 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 5: Locke and Descartes -- 5.1 Introduction: Locke's Engagement with Descartes -- 5.2 Locke's Anti-innatism as Anti-Cartesianism: The Idea of Infinity -- 5.3 Locke Contra Cartesian Ontology.

5.4 Lockean Ontology and Method in a Cartesian Context -- Note -- References -- Further Reading -- Part II: Metaphysics and Epistemology -- Chapter 6: The Genesis and Composition of the ESSAY -- 6.1 The Early Drafts: Draft A -- 6.2 The Early Drafts: Draft B -- 6.3 Work in Progress, 1671-1685 -- 6.4 Draft C (1685) -- 6.5 First Publication: the Abrégé -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 7: The Theory of Ideas -- 7.1 What Are Ideas? -- 7.2 Simple and Complex Ideas -- 7.3 Mental Operations -- 7.4 Representation -- 7.5 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 8: Locke's Critique of Innatism -- 8.1 Varieties of Dispositional Nativism -- 8.2 Locke's Overall Critique of Innatism -- 8.3 Assessing Locke's Arguments -- 8.4 Conclusion: Locke's Real Challenge -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 9: Locke on Perception -- 9.1 General Considerations on Sensation -- 9.2 Visual Perception of Shape -- 9.3 Perception and Time -- Note -- References -- Chapter 10: Primary and Secondary Qualities -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Context -- 10.3 Location -- 10.4 Structure -- 10.5 Locke's view -- 10.6 The "Berkeleyan interpretation" of Locke -- 10.7 Resemblance Revisited -- 10.8 Qualities and Powers -- 10.9 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 11: Locke on Essence and the Social Construction of Kinds -- 11.1 Stages in Kind Creation -- 11.2 The Simplicity and Strength of Locke's Story -- 11.3 Are There Real Essences of Kinds or Species? -- 11.4 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 12: Locke's Theory of Identity -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Easy Cases: God, Finite Intelligences, Atoms, and Masses -- 12.3 A Less Easy but More Interesting Case: Organisms -- 12.4 A Problem about Coincidence -- 12.5 The Least Easy but Most Interesting Case: Persons -- 12.6 Locke against Substance-Based Theories of Personal Identity.

12.7 Getting Away with Murder? -- 12.8 Two Famous Objections: The Circularity Objection and the Transitivity Objection -- 12.9 The Transitivity Objection -- 12.10 Attempts to Save Locke from the Transitivity Problem -- 12.11 Conclusion: The Silver Lining -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 13: Liberty and Suspension in Locke's Theory of the Will -- 13.1 Locke's Key Concepts -- 13.2 Locke's Key Doctrines -- 13.3 "Motivational Determinism" and the "Elusive Something" -- 13.4 Just Punishment, Intellectual Freedom, and Freedom to Will -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 14: Language and Meaning -- 14.1 Some Methodological Preliminaries -- 14.2 Locke on Language, Thought, and Linguistic Signification -- 14.3 Linguistic Communication and the Problem of Privacy -- 14.4 Locke on General Terms and Abstraction -- 14.5 Propositions and particles -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 15: Locke on Knowledge and Belief -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 The Varieties of Knowledge -- 15.3 The Two Demonstrative Sciences -- 15.4 "The Twilight … of Probability" -- 15.5 The Regulation of Assent -- 15.6 Practical Advice on Improving One's Opinions -- 15.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 16: Sensitive Knowledge: Locke on Skepticism and Sensation -- 16.1 Definitions and Distinctions -- 16.2 The nature of sensitive knowledge -- 16.3 Pleasure, Pain, and Certainty "As Great as Our Happiness, or Misery" -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 17: Locke on Thinking Matter -- 17.1 The Uncertain Nature of Thinking Substance -- 17.2 Mechanism and The Possibility of Thinking Matter -- 17.3 The Intelligence and Immateriality of God -- 17.4 Divine Superaddition -- References -- Chapter 18: The Correspondence with Stillingfleet -- 18.1 The Origins of the Controversy -- 18.2 Locke's First Letter -- 18.3 Stillingfleet's First Answer -- 18.4 Locke's Second Letter.

18.5 Stillingfleet's Second Answer -- 18.6 Locke's Third Letter -- References -- Further Reading -- Part III: Government, Ethics, and Society -- Chapter 19: Locke on the Law of Nature and Natural Rights -- 19.1 Locke's "Potter-God" -- 19.2 Concurrent Univocal Property -- 19.3 Divine Versus Human Workmanship and Self-Ownership -- 19.4 "Nesting" Property, The Law of Nature, and Natural Rights -- 19.5 Slavery and Suicide -- 19.6 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 20: Locke on Property and Money -- 20.1 Introduction -- 20.2 The Nature and Extent of Lockean Property -- 20.3 The Labor Theory of Appropriation -- 20.4 Money and the Origins of Inequality -- 20.5 From Money to Political Society -- 20.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 21: Locke on the Social Contract -- 21.1 Locke and Social Contract Theory -- 21.2 The State of Nature -- 21.3 Locke's Social Contract -- 21.4 Limits on and Forms of Consent -- 21.5 Government -- Further Reading -- Chapter 22: Locke on Toleration -- 22.1 The Historical Context -- 22.2 The Two Tracts -- 22.3 An Essay Concerning Toleration and Epistola de Tolerantia -- 22.4 The Later Letters on Toleration -- 22.5 Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 23: Locke on Education -- 23.1 Some Thoughts Concerning Education -- 23.2 Of the Conduct of the Understanding -- 23.3 Interpretive Issues -- 23.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part IV: Religion -- Chapter 24: Locke's Philosophy of Religion -- 24.1 Introduction -- 24.2 Arguments for the Existence and Unity of God -- 24.3 The Ladder of Being: Man's Place in the World -- 24.4 The Problem of Evil: God's Goodness and Justice and Human Limitation and Knowledge -- 24.5 Reason and Faith, Revelation and Miracles -- 24.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 25: The Reasonableness of Christianity and A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St Paul.

25.1 Introduction -- 25.2 The Reasonableness of Christianity -- 25.3 A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St Paul -- 25.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part V: Locke's Legacy -- Chapter 26: Locke and British Empiricism -- 26.1 Lockean Apparatus -- 26.2 Demonstrative Knowledge -- 26.3 Hume and Locke's Restrictions on the Third Degree of Knowledge -- 26.4 Association and Custom -- 26.5 Hume's Meaning Empiricism Reconsidered -- 26.6 Meaning Empiricism and Cartesian Metaphysics in Berkeley -- 26.7 Epistemic Priority and Reification -- 26.8 The External World and Inference to the Best Explanation -- 26.9 Enumerative Induction and a Revived Explanationism -- 26.10 Nativism and Basic Beliefs in External Objects -- 26.11 Berkeley's Influence on Hume -- References -- Chapter 27: Locke and the Liberal Tradition -- 27.1 Natural Law and Natural Moral Rights -- 27.2 Theology and Ethics -- 27.3 Consent -- 27.4 The Family -- 27.5 Property -- 27.6 Limited Government and the Right to Rebel -- 27.7 Three Conceptions of Liberalism -- References -- Chapter 28: Locke and America -- 28.1 Postcolonial Locke -- 28.2 Governing America -- 28.3 Anthropology and Moral Philosophy -- 28.4 Theories of Empire -- 28.5 The Agriculturist Argument -- 28.6 Colonial Legacies -- 28.7 Slavery -- 28.8 Constraining Empire -- References -- Index -- EULA.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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