Why Be Moral? : Learning from the Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers.

By: Huang, YongSeries: SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and CulturePublisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (360 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781438452920Subject(s): Cheng, Yi, -- 1033-1107.;Cheng, Hao, -- 1032-1085.;Ethics -- China.;Neo-ConfucianismGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Why Be Moral? : Learning from the Neo-Confucian Cheng BrothersDDC classification: 170.951 LOC classification: BJ1185.C5 -- .H828 2014ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Possibility of Comparative Philosophy -- 3. How to Do Comparative Philosophy -- 4. The Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers -- 5. Looking Ahead -- 6. Conclusion -- Chapter 1: Joy (le 樂): "Why Be Moral?" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Question of "Why Be Moral?" -- 3. Representative Answers in Western Philosophy and Their Inadequacies -- 4. The Chengs' Neo-Confucian Answer: Joy in Being Moral -- 5. Joy and Knowledge -- 6. To Be Moral and to Be Human -- 7. Conclusion -- Chapter 2: Virtue (de 德): Is a Virtuous Person Self-Centered? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Virtue Ethics and Confucian Ethics -- 3. The Self-Centeredness Objection: The First Level -- 4. Virtue and Human Nature -- 5. The Self-Centeredness Objection: The Second Level -- 6. The Self-Centeredness Objection: The Foundational Level -- 7. Conclusion -- Chapter 3: Knowledge (zhi 知): How Is Weakness of the Will (akrasia) Not Possible? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Problem of Weakness of the Will in Western Philosophy -- 3. Knowledge and Action: Why Is Weakness of the Will Not Possible? -- 4. Knowledge of/as Virtue versus Knowledge from Hearingand Seeing: How Is Weakness of the Will Not Possible? -- 5. Cheng Brothers versus Socrates and Aristotle -- 6. Absence of Weakness of the Will and the Presence of Moral Responsibility -- 7. Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Love (ai 愛): Ethics between Theory and Antitheory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Ethics of Commonality and Its Problem -- 3. Love with Distinction -- 4. Extension of Love -- 5. Training of Emotions -- 6. Conclusion -- Chapter 5: Propriety (li 禮): Why the Political Is Also Personal -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Political/Personal Division in the Liberal Traditionand Its Problems -- 3. The Possibility of a Confucian Political Philosophy -- 4. Propriety as External Rules.
5. Propriety as Inner Feelings -- 6. Propriety as Human Nature -- 7. Defending the Neo-Confucian Conception of Propriety as a Political Philosophy -- 8. Conclusion -- Chapter 6: Creativity (li 理): The Metaphysic of Morals or Moral Metaphysics? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Metaphysic of Morals, Moral Theology, and Moral Metaphysics -- 3. Li: Ontological Articulation of Confucian Morality -- 4. Sheng 生 (Life-Giving Activity): Dereification of the Ultimate Reality -- 5. Shen 神 (Divinity or God): Toward a Confucian Theology -- 6. Conclusion -- Chapter 7: Classics (Jing 經): Hermeneutics as a Practical Learning -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Classics as Carriers of Dao (Jing Yi Zai Dao 經以 ) -- 3. To Grasp Dao through Classics (You Jing Qiong Li 由經窮理) -- 4. Multiple Ways to Dao (Qiong Li Duo Duan 窮理多端 -- 1. Study History (Kao Gujin 古今) -- 2. Handle Human Affairs (Kui Renshi 揆人事) -- 3. Reflect upon Oneself (Qu Zhushen 取 ) -- 4. Investigate External Things and Events (Cha Wuqing 察物情) -- 5. Hermeneutics as a Practical Learning (Jingxue Shixue Ye 經學實學也) -- 6. Hermeneutic Circles (Jiao Xiang Yang Ye 交相 也) -- 7. Conclusion -- Appendix Neo-Confucian Hermeneutics at Work: Cheng Yi's Philosophical Interpretation of Analects 8.9 and 17.3 -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Conventional Interpretations of Analects 8.9 -- 3. Cheng Yi's Interpretation of Analects 8.9 -- 4. Conventional Interpretation of Analects 17.3 -- 5. Cheng Yi's Interpretation of Analects 17.3 -- 6. The Role of Sages: Education -- 7. Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
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Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Possibility of Comparative Philosophy -- 3. How to Do Comparative Philosophy -- 4. The Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers -- 5. Looking Ahead -- 6. Conclusion -- Chapter 1: Joy (le 樂): "Why Be Moral?" -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Question of "Why Be Moral?" -- 3. Representative Answers in Western Philosophy and Their Inadequacies -- 4. The Chengs' Neo-Confucian Answer: Joy in Being Moral -- 5. Joy and Knowledge -- 6. To Be Moral and to Be Human -- 7. Conclusion -- Chapter 2: Virtue (de 德): Is a Virtuous Person Self-Centered? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Virtue Ethics and Confucian Ethics -- 3. The Self-Centeredness Objection: The First Level -- 4. Virtue and Human Nature -- 5. The Self-Centeredness Objection: The Second Level -- 6. The Self-Centeredness Objection: The Foundational Level -- 7. Conclusion -- Chapter 3: Knowledge (zhi 知): How Is Weakness of the Will (akrasia) Not Possible? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Problem of Weakness of the Will in Western Philosophy -- 3. Knowledge and Action: Why Is Weakness of the Will Not Possible? -- 4. Knowledge of/as Virtue versus Knowledge from Hearingand Seeing: How Is Weakness of the Will Not Possible? -- 5. Cheng Brothers versus Socrates and Aristotle -- 6. Absence of Weakness of the Will and the Presence of Moral Responsibility -- 7. Conclusion -- Chapter 4 Love (ai 愛): Ethics between Theory and Antitheory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Ethics of Commonality and Its Problem -- 3. Love with Distinction -- 4. Extension of Love -- 5. Training of Emotions -- 6. Conclusion -- Chapter 5: Propriety (li 禮): Why the Political Is Also Personal -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Political/Personal Division in the Liberal Traditionand Its Problems -- 3. The Possibility of a Confucian Political Philosophy -- 4. Propriety as External Rules.

5. Propriety as Inner Feelings -- 6. Propriety as Human Nature -- 7. Defending the Neo-Confucian Conception of Propriety as a Political Philosophy -- 8. Conclusion -- Chapter 6: Creativity (li 理): The Metaphysic of Morals or Moral Metaphysics? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Metaphysic of Morals, Moral Theology, and Moral Metaphysics -- 3. Li: Ontological Articulation of Confucian Morality -- 4. Sheng 生 (Life-Giving Activity): Dereification of the Ultimate Reality -- 5. Shen 神 (Divinity or God): Toward a Confucian Theology -- 6. Conclusion -- Chapter 7: Classics (Jing 經): Hermeneutics as a Practical Learning -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Classics as Carriers of Dao (Jing Yi Zai Dao 經以 ) -- 3. To Grasp Dao through Classics (You Jing Qiong Li 由經窮理) -- 4. Multiple Ways to Dao (Qiong Li Duo Duan 窮理多端 -- 1. Study History (Kao Gujin 古今) -- 2. Handle Human Affairs (Kui Renshi 揆人事) -- 3. Reflect upon Oneself (Qu Zhushen 取 ) -- 4. Investigate External Things and Events (Cha Wuqing 察物情) -- 5. Hermeneutics as a Practical Learning (Jingxue Shixue Ye 經學實學也) -- 6. Hermeneutic Circles (Jiao Xiang Yang Ye 交相 也) -- 7. Conclusion -- Appendix Neo-Confucian Hermeneutics at Work: Cheng Yi's Philosophical Interpretation of Analects 8.9 and 17.3 -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Conventional Interpretations of Analects 8.9 -- 3. Cheng Yi's Interpretation of Analects 8.9 -- 4. Conventional Interpretation of Analects 17.3 -- 5. Cheng Yi's Interpretation of Analects 17.3 -- 6. The Role of Sages: Education -- 7. Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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