Tense, Reference, and Worldmaking.

By: McGilvray, James APublisher: Montreal : MQUP, 1991Copyright date: ©1991Description: 1 online resource (391 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780773563131Subject(s): English language -- Tense.;Grammar, Comparative and general -- Tense.;English language -- Reference.;Role and reference grammarGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Tense, Reference, and WorldmakingDDC classification: 425 LOC classification: PE1301Online resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 THE BASIC TEMPORAL AND SEMANTIC STRUCTURE OF SENTENCES -- 1.1 Temporal and Semantic Structure -- 1.1.1 Temporal Structure -- 1.1.2 Reichenbach's 1947 Formalism -- 1.1.3 The 1947 Topology Supplemented -- 1.1.4 The Natures of Speakers, Tokens, "Perceiver-Describers," Companions, and Situations -- 1.1.5 Persons, Competence, Groups, and Locations -- 1.2 Applying the Theory -- 1.2.1 Adverbials and Simple Sentences -- 1.2.2 The Future Tense -- 1.2.3 The Anterior and Posterior -- 1.3 Tense Is Not an SE Relationship -- 1.3.1 Tense Logic and the SE Relationship -- 1.3.2 SE Relationships and the Consequences of Tenses -- 2 COMPLEX SITUATIONS -- 2.1 Propositional Attitudes -- 2.1.1 The Structure in Detail -- 2.1.2 An Epistemic Matter: Responsibility and Tense -- 2.2 Modals, Epistemic and Root -- 2.2.1 Root Modals -- 2.2.2 Epistemic Modals -- 2.3 'When' -- 2.3.1 Conditioned Root Modals -- 2.4 Iterative States: Habituals, Nomics, and Generalizations -- 2.4.1 The Structure -- 2.4.2 The Nomic Difference -- 2.5 Conditionals and Arguments -- 2.5.1 The Structure of the Standard Conditional -- 2.5.2 The Subjunctive and Counterfactual Conditionals -- 2.5.3 Arguments, Conditioned Root-Modal Iteratives, and the Storytelling "We -- 2.5.4 Conditionals, (A)s, Truth, and Scepticism -- 3 MEANING, MEANINGFULNESS, AND REFERENCE -- 3.1 Meaning and Meaningfulness -- 3.2 Truth Conditions and Meaning -- 3.3 Meaning as Referring -- 3.3.1 Indexicality -- 3.3.2 Exemplificational Reference to t, i[sub(s)], and p -- Ties -- 3.3.3 On Referring: Picturing Situations -- 3.3.4 On Chomsky's Contribution -- 3.3.5 Just Slightly More Than Syntax and Lexicon -- Public Meanings -- 3.3.6 Means-Sentences -- 3.3.7 Meaning, Publicity, and Scepticism -- 3.4 Semantics and World: Double Constructivism -- 4 REFERENCE.
4.1 The Standard View of Reference -- 4.2 Picture Reference -- 4.2.1 Recognizing and Classifying -- 4.2.2 Synonymy and Analyticity -- 4.2.3 Meaning Change -- 4.2.4 Proper Names -- 4.2.5 Complex Pictures -- 4.3 Identifying Reference -- 4.3.1 Other Views: Preliminary Remarks -- 4.3.2 Salience for ψ -- 4.3.3 Reidentification -- 4.3.4 Identifying Reference and the Autonomy of Contents -- 4.4 Demonstrative Reference -- 5 EXISTENCE AND TENSE -- 5.1 Existence: An Overview -- 5.1.1 Existence and Meaningfulness -- 5.1.2 Towards a Criterion of Existence -- 5.1.3 The Platonic Gambit -- 5.1.4 Existence Sentences -- 5.2 Mathematical Sentences, the Existence of Numbers, and Mathematical Truth -- 6 SITUATIONS AND ASPECTS -- 6.1 Situations -- 6.1.1 Movements -- 6.1.2 Processes (Including Activities) -- 6.1.3 Changes -- 6.1.4 States -- 6.2 Imperfectives and Perfectives of Situations with Bounds -- 6.3 Imperfectives and Perfectives of Situations without Bounds -- 6.3.1 Simple States -- 6.3.2 Scheduling States -- 6.3.3 Iterative States -- 6.3.4 Propositional Attitude States (and Processes) -- 6.4 Discourse Effects of the Perfective and Imperfective of Situations with Bounds -- 6.5 REs (Contents) and Perfectives and Imperfectives -- 7 MEANING, MEANINGFULNESS, AND CONSTRUCTIVISM -- 7.1 Content Competence: Picture-Referential and Attention Groups -- 7.1.1 The Limits of Meaning: How Many Propositions Are There? -- 7.2 The Evidence and Storytelling Groups -- 7.2.1 Forces -- 7.2.2 Truth: Time, Tense, and Storytelling -- 7.2.3 A Theory of Force? -- 7.3 Constructivism -- 7.4 Worldmaking Reconceived: Projective Illusions -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- W.
Summary: The tenses of natural languages are intimately connected with the abilities we have to relate real or fictional stories that take place outside our immediate temporal or spacial context. While philosophers and cognitive scientists have had difficulty coming to terms with these abilities, James McGilvray maintains that they must be understood before an adequate view of what a tense is can be constructed.
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Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 THE BASIC TEMPORAL AND SEMANTIC STRUCTURE OF SENTENCES -- 1.1 Temporal and Semantic Structure -- 1.1.1 Temporal Structure -- 1.1.2 Reichenbach's 1947 Formalism -- 1.1.3 The 1947 Topology Supplemented -- 1.1.4 The Natures of Speakers, Tokens, "Perceiver-Describers," Companions, and Situations -- 1.1.5 Persons, Competence, Groups, and Locations -- 1.2 Applying the Theory -- 1.2.1 Adverbials and Simple Sentences -- 1.2.2 The Future Tense -- 1.2.3 The Anterior and Posterior -- 1.3 Tense Is Not an SE Relationship -- 1.3.1 Tense Logic and the SE Relationship -- 1.3.2 SE Relationships and the Consequences of Tenses -- 2 COMPLEX SITUATIONS -- 2.1 Propositional Attitudes -- 2.1.1 The Structure in Detail -- 2.1.2 An Epistemic Matter: Responsibility and Tense -- 2.2 Modals, Epistemic and Root -- 2.2.1 Root Modals -- 2.2.2 Epistemic Modals -- 2.3 'When' -- 2.3.1 Conditioned Root Modals -- 2.4 Iterative States: Habituals, Nomics, and Generalizations -- 2.4.1 The Structure -- 2.4.2 The Nomic Difference -- 2.5 Conditionals and Arguments -- 2.5.1 The Structure of the Standard Conditional -- 2.5.2 The Subjunctive and Counterfactual Conditionals -- 2.5.3 Arguments, Conditioned Root-Modal Iteratives, and the Storytelling "We -- 2.5.4 Conditionals, (A)s, Truth, and Scepticism -- 3 MEANING, MEANINGFULNESS, AND REFERENCE -- 3.1 Meaning and Meaningfulness -- 3.2 Truth Conditions and Meaning -- 3.3 Meaning as Referring -- 3.3.1 Indexicality -- 3.3.2 Exemplificational Reference to t, i[sub(s)], and p -- Ties -- 3.3.3 On Referring: Picturing Situations -- 3.3.4 On Chomsky's Contribution -- 3.3.5 Just Slightly More Than Syntax and Lexicon -- Public Meanings -- 3.3.6 Means-Sentences -- 3.3.7 Meaning, Publicity, and Scepticism -- 3.4 Semantics and World: Double Constructivism -- 4 REFERENCE.

4.1 The Standard View of Reference -- 4.2 Picture Reference -- 4.2.1 Recognizing and Classifying -- 4.2.2 Synonymy and Analyticity -- 4.2.3 Meaning Change -- 4.2.4 Proper Names -- 4.2.5 Complex Pictures -- 4.3 Identifying Reference -- 4.3.1 Other Views: Preliminary Remarks -- 4.3.2 Salience for ψ -- 4.3.3 Reidentification -- 4.3.4 Identifying Reference and the Autonomy of Contents -- 4.4 Demonstrative Reference -- 5 EXISTENCE AND TENSE -- 5.1 Existence: An Overview -- 5.1.1 Existence and Meaningfulness -- 5.1.2 Towards a Criterion of Existence -- 5.1.3 The Platonic Gambit -- 5.1.4 Existence Sentences -- 5.2 Mathematical Sentences, the Existence of Numbers, and Mathematical Truth -- 6 SITUATIONS AND ASPECTS -- 6.1 Situations -- 6.1.1 Movements -- 6.1.2 Processes (Including Activities) -- 6.1.3 Changes -- 6.1.4 States -- 6.2 Imperfectives and Perfectives of Situations with Bounds -- 6.3 Imperfectives and Perfectives of Situations without Bounds -- 6.3.1 Simple States -- 6.3.2 Scheduling States -- 6.3.3 Iterative States -- 6.3.4 Propositional Attitude States (and Processes) -- 6.4 Discourse Effects of the Perfective and Imperfective of Situations with Bounds -- 6.5 REs (Contents) and Perfectives and Imperfectives -- 7 MEANING, MEANINGFULNESS, AND CONSTRUCTIVISM -- 7.1 Content Competence: Picture-Referential and Attention Groups -- 7.1.1 The Limits of Meaning: How Many Propositions Are There? -- 7.2 The Evidence and Storytelling Groups -- 7.2.1 Forces -- 7.2.2 Truth: Time, Tense, and Storytelling -- 7.2.3 A Theory of Force? -- 7.3 Constructivism -- 7.4 Worldmaking Reconceived: Projective Illusions -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- W.

The tenses of natural languages are intimately connected with the abilities we have to relate real or fictional stories that take place outside our immediate temporal or spacial context. While philosophers and cognitive scientists have had difficulty coming to terms with these abilities, James McGilvray maintains that they must be understood before an adequate view of what a tense is can be constructed.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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