Amazon cover image
Image from Amazon.com

Norwegian Modals.

By: Series: Studies in Generative Grammar [SGG] SerPublisher: Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc., 2006Copyright date: ©2006Description: 1 online resource (457 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9783110899634
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Norwegian ModalsDDC classification:
  • 439.8256
LOC classification:
  • PD2661 -- .E33 2005eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1. Norwegian modals: main verbs and auxiliaries -- 2. The central subjects of this investigation -- 3. The root-epistemic distinction -- 4. The framework -- 5. The data -- Chapter 2: Norwegian Modals: the Facts -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Morphological characteristics -- 3. Semantic characteristics -- 3.1 A brief overview of some central modality terms -- 3.2 Two seminal formal semantic descriptions of modals -- 3.3 A semantic field of modality -- 3.4 The semantic properties of Norwegain modals -- 3.5 Modals, readings and n-place relations -- 4. Syntactic characteristics -- 4.1 Complements of Norwegian modals -- 4.2 Modals, ellipsis, and tags -- 4.3 Summary of findings -- 5. Summary and preliminary inventory -- 5.1. Examining our results -- 6. Three potential candidates -- 7 Final inventory and inventories of seven other languages -- 7.1 Norwegian modals: final inventory -- 7.2 Inventories of modals in seven other languages -- Chapter 3: Analyzing Modals: a Survey of Recent Proposals -- 1. Two central notions -- 1.1. Theta-roles -- 1.2. Functional projections -- 2. Some earlier proposals -- 2.1. Roberts (1985) -- 2.2. Roberts (1993) -- 2.3. Roberts and Roussou (2002, 2003) -- 2.4. Cinque (1999) -- 2.5. Vikner(1988) -- 2.6. Thráinsson and Vikner (1995) -- 2.7. Barbiers (1995, 2002) -- 2.8. Lødrup (1996a) -- 2.9. Dyvik(1999) -- 2.10. Wurmbrand (1999, 2001) -- 2.11. Butler (2003) -- 2.12. van Gelderen (2003, 2004) -- 2.13. Picallo(1990) -- 3. Modals and theta-roles -- 4. Insertion or merger point of root and non-root modals -- Chapter 4: Norwegian Modals: Argument Structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The control versus raising analysis -- 3. Modals in pseudoclefts -- 3.1 The relevant generalization: ± proposition scope -- 3.2 The pseudocleft construction -- 3.3 Modals and subject scope.
3.4 Competing for subject positions: Theta relations vs. subject scope -- 3.5 Subject-orientedness and subject positions -- 3.6 Reanalysis verbs -- 3.7 Raising verbs and pseudoclefts -- 4. Explaining subject-orientedness -- 4.1. It is not a real Theta-role -- 4.2 Occational redefinition of argument structure -- 4.3 Double entries -- 4.4 Optional Theta-assignment -- 4.5 Evaluating the alternatives -- 5. The source of modality: Two semantic levels -- 6. Summary -- Chapter 5: Norwegian Modals, Aspect and Tense -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Tense and aspect -- 2.1 Tense -- 2.2 Aspect -- 3. Aspect and tense of complements -- 3.1 Directional small clauses -- 3.2 The perfect -- 3.3 The progressive -- 3.4 The iterative -- 4. Modality, tense, and aspect: Scope, readings, and universality -- 4.1. Creole TMA systems and universalist hyotheses -- 4.2. TMA markers in Norwegian -- 4.3 Modal-aspectual sequences in other languages -- 4.4 Universalist approaches and the modal-tense-aspectual data -- 5. A compositional tense system for Norwegian -- 5.1 Julien (2000a, 2001) -- 5.2 A different approach -- 5.3 The function of ha ‚have' -- 6. The properties of the complement: tense and aspect -- 6.1 Default and overrride -- 6.2 Truth values and tenses, verbs and directionals -- 7. The tense properties of root and non-root modals -- 7.1 The tense of root modals -- 7.2 The tense of non-root modals -- 8. Summing up -- Chapter 6: Summing up -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The facts -- 3. Earlier proposals -- 4. Argument structure -- 5. Modals, aspect, and tense -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- Index.
Summary: The architecture of the human language faculty has been one of the main foci of the linguistic research of the last half century. This branch of linguistics, broadly known as Generative Grammar, is concerned with the formulation of explanatory formal accounts of linguistic phenomena with the ulterior goal of gaining insight into the properties of the 'language organ'. The series comprises high quality monographs and collected volumes that address such issues. The topics in this series range from phonology to semantics, from syntax to information structure, from mathematical linguistics to studies of the lexicon.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan Available EBKAF-N00019306
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP-N00019306
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia Available
Total holds: 0

Intro -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1. Norwegian modals: main verbs and auxiliaries -- 2. The central subjects of this investigation -- 3. The root-epistemic distinction -- 4. The framework -- 5. The data -- Chapter 2: Norwegian Modals: the Facts -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Morphological characteristics -- 3. Semantic characteristics -- 3.1 A brief overview of some central modality terms -- 3.2 Two seminal formal semantic descriptions of modals -- 3.3 A semantic field of modality -- 3.4 The semantic properties of Norwegain modals -- 3.5 Modals, readings and n-place relations -- 4. Syntactic characteristics -- 4.1 Complements of Norwegian modals -- 4.2 Modals, ellipsis, and tags -- 4.3 Summary of findings -- 5. Summary and preliminary inventory -- 5.1. Examining our results -- 6. Three potential candidates -- 7 Final inventory and inventories of seven other languages -- 7.1 Norwegian modals: final inventory -- 7.2 Inventories of modals in seven other languages -- Chapter 3: Analyzing Modals: a Survey of Recent Proposals -- 1. Two central notions -- 1.1. Theta-roles -- 1.2. Functional projections -- 2. Some earlier proposals -- 2.1. Roberts (1985) -- 2.2. Roberts (1993) -- 2.3. Roberts and Roussou (2002, 2003) -- 2.4. Cinque (1999) -- 2.5. Vikner(1988) -- 2.6. Thráinsson and Vikner (1995) -- 2.7. Barbiers (1995, 2002) -- 2.8. Lødrup (1996a) -- 2.9. Dyvik(1999) -- 2.10. Wurmbrand (1999, 2001) -- 2.11. Butler (2003) -- 2.12. van Gelderen (2003, 2004) -- 2.13. Picallo(1990) -- 3. Modals and theta-roles -- 4. Insertion or merger point of root and non-root modals -- Chapter 4: Norwegian Modals: Argument Structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The control versus raising analysis -- 3. Modals in pseudoclefts -- 3.1 The relevant generalization: ± proposition scope -- 3.2 The pseudocleft construction -- 3.3 Modals and subject scope.

3.4 Competing for subject positions: Theta relations vs. subject scope -- 3.5 Subject-orientedness and subject positions -- 3.6 Reanalysis verbs -- 3.7 Raising verbs and pseudoclefts -- 4. Explaining subject-orientedness -- 4.1. It is not a real Theta-role -- 4.2 Occational redefinition of argument structure -- 4.3 Double entries -- 4.4 Optional Theta-assignment -- 4.5 Evaluating the alternatives -- 5. The source of modality: Two semantic levels -- 6. Summary -- Chapter 5: Norwegian Modals, Aspect and Tense -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Tense and aspect -- 2.1 Tense -- 2.2 Aspect -- 3. Aspect and tense of complements -- 3.1 Directional small clauses -- 3.2 The perfect -- 3.3 The progressive -- 3.4 The iterative -- 4. Modality, tense, and aspect: Scope, readings, and universality -- 4.1. Creole TMA systems and universalist hyotheses -- 4.2. TMA markers in Norwegian -- 4.3 Modal-aspectual sequences in other languages -- 4.4 Universalist approaches and the modal-tense-aspectual data -- 5. A compositional tense system for Norwegian -- 5.1 Julien (2000a, 2001) -- 5.2 A different approach -- 5.3 The function of ha ‚have' -- 6. The properties of the complement: tense and aspect -- 6.1 Default and overrride -- 6.2 Truth values and tenses, verbs and directionals -- 7. The tense properties of root and non-root modals -- 7.1 The tense of root modals -- 7.2 The tense of non-root modals -- 8. Summing up -- Chapter 6: Summing up -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The facts -- 3. Earlier proposals -- 4. Argument structure -- 5. Modals, aspect, and tense -- 6. Concluding remarks -- References -- Index.

The architecture of the human language faculty has been one of the main foci of the linguistic research of the last half century. This branch of linguistics, broadly known as Generative Grammar, is concerned with the formulation of explanatory formal accounts of linguistic phenomena with the ulterior goal of gaining insight into the properties of the 'language organ'. The series comprises high quality monographs and collected volumes that address such issues. The topics in this series range from phonology to semantics, from syntax to information structure, from mathematical linguistics to studies of the lexicon.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.