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The Prosodic Word in European Portuguese.

By: Series: Interface Explorations [IE] SerPublisher: Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc., 2002Copyright date: ©2003Description: 1 online resource (456 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9783110900927
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Prosodic Word in European PortugueseDDC classification:
  • 469.16
LOC classification:
  • PC5077 -- .V54 2003eb
Online resources:
Contents:
Intro -- Abbreviations and symbols -- Chapter 1. Theoretical background -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Prosodic Phonology: basic claims -- 3. The organization of grammar -- 3.1. The lexical/postlexical distinction and the properties of phonological processes -- 3.2. The locus of construction of prosodic domains -- 4. The status of the Clitic Group within the prosodic hierarchy -- 5. The Strict Layer Hypothesis -- 6. The prosodization of words -- 6.1. Diagnostics for the prosodic word -- 6.2. The prosodic word domain -- 6.3. The prosodization of clitics -- 6.4. The prosodization of compounds -- 6.5. The prosodization of derived words -- 7. Syllabification, resyllabification, and prosodic restructuring -- 8. Concluding remarks and outline of the book -- Chapter 2. Previous studies on European Portuguese word phonology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Pregenerative studies -- 3. SPE studies -- 4. Post-SPE studies -- 4.1. Words with two primary stresses -- 4.2. Cliticization -- 4.3. Phonological processes and the organization of grammar -- 5. Concluding remarks -- Chapter 3. Phonological phenomena: description and typology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word stress -- 3. Vowel reduction -- 4. Theme vowel deletion -- 5. Final nasal diphthongization -- 6. /e/-centralization -- 7. Glide insertion to break a hiatus -- 8. Lowering of stressless vowels in final syllables closed by /ɾ/ -- 9. Initial /ɾ/-strengthening -- 10. The realization of word initial vowels -- 11. Semivocalization -- 11.1. V2 semivocalization (>VG) -- 11.2. V1 semivocalization (>GV) -- 12. Final non-back vowel deletion -- 13. Final round vowel deletion -- 14. Final central vowel deletion -- 15. Syllable degemination -- 16. Initial stress -- 17. Emphatic stress -- 18. Tonal association -- 19. Focal stress -- 20. Summary -- Chapter 4. On the affix/clitic status of stressless pronouns -- 1. Introduction.
2. Potential evidence for the lexical attachment of pronominal clitics -- 2.1. Specialized host -- 2.2. Phonological idiosyncrasy -- 2.3. "Inflection" after cliticization -- 3. Evidence for the postlexical insertion of pronominal clitics -- 3.1. Distributional facts -- 3.2. Phonological facts -- 3.3. Other facts -- 4. On the marks of lexicalization -- 4.1. Selectivity with respect to the host -- 4.2. Phonological idiosyncrasy -- 4.3. Mesoclisis -- 5. Conclusion -- Chapter 5. The Prosodic Word -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phonological properties of prosodic words -- 3. Derived and inflected words corresponding to a single stress domain -- 3.1. Prosodization of suffixes -- 3.2. Prosodization of prefixes -- 4. Host plus clitic combinations -- 4.1. Phonological characterization of clitic words -- 4.2. Lexical prosodization of clitics -- 4.3. Postlexical prosodization of clitics -- 5. Affixes versus clitics -- 5.1. Suffixes and enclitics -- 5.2. Prefixes and proclitics -- 6. Conclusion: towards the definition of the prosodic word domain in EP -- Chapter 6. Compound Prosodic Words -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phonological characterization of prosodic words and their concatenation -- 3. Prosodization of words with more than one stress domain -- 3.1. Suffixed words with more than one word stress -- 3.2. Words with stressed prefixes -- 3.3. Morphological compounds (stem compounds) -- 3.4. Syntactic compounds (word compounds) -- 3.5. Abbreviations -- 3.6. Mesoclitic structures -- 3.7. Specific combinations of words -- 3.8. Interim summary -- 4. Additional evidence for the prosodic word domain -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1. On the sources of word stress -- 5.2. On the relation between word stress and the prosodic word -- 5.3. Definition of the prosodic word domain in EP: final remarks -- Chapter 7. On the reduction of clitics -- 1. Introduction.
2. EP vowel reduction and other reduction phenomena -- 3. Data collection: materials and procedure -- 4. Results -- 4.1. Consonant-schwa clitics -- 4.2. Other clitics: para, pelo/pela, ao and em -- 4.3. The clitic com -- 4.4. Summary -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1. The phonetic shape of clitics and EP general processes of reduction -- 5.2. Reduction phenomena and word frequency -- 5.3. Generalizations on the reduction of very frequent words -- 5.4. Factors (dis)favoring reduction -- 5.5. Reduction versus allomorphy -- 6. Summary of main findings -- Chapter 8. Conclusion and directions of future research -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Minimal prosodic words -- 3. Clitics and their postlexical attachment -- 4. Compound prosodic words -- 5. Our findings and phonological theory -- 6. Our findings and EP phonology -- 7. Our findings and language acquisition -- 8. Final word -- Appendix I -- Appendix II -- Notes -- References -- Index.
Summary: This series consists of collected volumes and monographs about specific issues dealing with interfaces among the subcomponents of linguistic structure: phonology-morphology, phonology-syntax, syntax-semantics, syntax-morphology, and syntax-lexicon. Recent linguistic research has recognized that the subcomponents of grammar interact in non-trivial ways. What is currently under debate is the actual range of such interactions and their most appropriate representation in grammar, and this is precisely the focus of this series. Specifically, it provides a general overview of various topics by examining them through the interaction of grammatical components. The books function as a state-of- the-art report of research.
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Intro -- Abbreviations and symbols -- Chapter 1. Theoretical background -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Prosodic Phonology: basic claims -- 3. The organization of grammar -- 3.1. The lexical/postlexical distinction and the properties of phonological processes -- 3.2. The locus of construction of prosodic domains -- 4. The status of the Clitic Group within the prosodic hierarchy -- 5. The Strict Layer Hypothesis -- 6. The prosodization of words -- 6.1. Diagnostics for the prosodic word -- 6.2. The prosodic word domain -- 6.3. The prosodization of clitics -- 6.4. The prosodization of compounds -- 6.5. The prosodization of derived words -- 7. Syllabification, resyllabification, and prosodic restructuring -- 8. Concluding remarks and outline of the book -- Chapter 2. Previous studies on European Portuguese word phonology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Pregenerative studies -- 3. SPE studies -- 4. Post-SPE studies -- 4.1. Words with two primary stresses -- 4.2. Cliticization -- 4.3. Phonological processes and the organization of grammar -- 5. Concluding remarks -- Chapter 3. Phonological phenomena: description and typology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word stress -- 3. Vowel reduction -- 4. Theme vowel deletion -- 5. Final nasal diphthongization -- 6. /e/-centralization -- 7. Glide insertion to break a hiatus -- 8. Lowering of stressless vowels in final syllables closed by /ɾ/ -- 9. Initial /ɾ/-strengthening -- 10. The realization of word initial vowels -- 11. Semivocalization -- 11.1. V2 semivocalization (>VG) -- 11.2. V1 semivocalization (>GV) -- 12. Final non-back vowel deletion -- 13. Final round vowel deletion -- 14. Final central vowel deletion -- 15. Syllable degemination -- 16. Initial stress -- 17. Emphatic stress -- 18. Tonal association -- 19. Focal stress -- 20. Summary -- Chapter 4. On the affix/clitic status of stressless pronouns -- 1. Introduction.

2. Potential evidence for the lexical attachment of pronominal clitics -- 2.1. Specialized host -- 2.2. Phonological idiosyncrasy -- 2.3. "Inflection" after cliticization -- 3. Evidence for the postlexical insertion of pronominal clitics -- 3.1. Distributional facts -- 3.2. Phonological facts -- 3.3. Other facts -- 4. On the marks of lexicalization -- 4.1. Selectivity with respect to the host -- 4.2. Phonological idiosyncrasy -- 4.3. Mesoclisis -- 5. Conclusion -- Chapter 5. The Prosodic Word -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phonological properties of prosodic words -- 3. Derived and inflected words corresponding to a single stress domain -- 3.1. Prosodization of suffixes -- 3.2. Prosodization of prefixes -- 4. Host plus clitic combinations -- 4.1. Phonological characterization of clitic words -- 4.2. Lexical prosodization of clitics -- 4.3. Postlexical prosodization of clitics -- 5. Affixes versus clitics -- 5.1. Suffixes and enclitics -- 5.2. Prefixes and proclitics -- 6. Conclusion: towards the definition of the prosodic word domain in EP -- Chapter 6. Compound Prosodic Words -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phonological characterization of prosodic words and their concatenation -- 3. Prosodization of words with more than one stress domain -- 3.1. Suffixed words with more than one word stress -- 3.2. Words with stressed prefixes -- 3.3. Morphological compounds (stem compounds) -- 3.4. Syntactic compounds (word compounds) -- 3.5. Abbreviations -- 3.6. Mesoclitic structures -- 3.7. Specific combinations of words -- 3.8. Interim summary -- 4. Additional evidence for the prosodic word domain -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1. On the sources of word stress -- 5.2. On the relation between word stress and the prosodic word -- 5.3. Definition of the prosodic word domain in EP: final remarks -- Chapter 7. On the reduction of clitics -- 1. Introduction.

2. EP vowel reduction and other reduction phenomena -- 3. Data collection: materials and procedure -- 4. Results -- 4.1. Consonant-schwa clitics -- 4.2. Other clitics: para, pelo/pela, ao and em -- 4.3. The clitic com -- 4.4. Summary -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1. The phonetic shape of clitics and EP general processes of reduction -- 5.2. Reduction phenomena and word frequency -- 5.3. Generalizations on the reduction of very frequent words -- 5.4. Factors (dis)favoring reduction -- 5.5. Reduction versus allomorphy -- 6. Summary of main findings -- Chapter 8. Conclusion and directions of future research -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Minimal prosodic words -- 3. Clitics and their postlexical attachment -- 4. Compound prosodic words -- 5. Our findings and phonological theory -- 6. Our findings and EP phonology -- 7. Our findings and language acquisition -- 8. Final word -- Appendix I -- Appendix II -- Notes -- References -- Index.

This series consists of collected volumes and monographs about specific issues dealing with interfaces among the subcomponents of linguistic structure: phonology-morphology, phonology-syntax, syntax-semantics, syntax-morphology, and syntax-lexicon. Recent linguistic research has recognized that the subcomponents of grammar interact in non-trivial ways. What is currently under debate is the actual range of such interactions and their most appropriate representation in grammar, and this is precisely the focus of this series. Specifically, it provides a general overview of various topics by examining them through the interaction of grammatical components. The books function as a state-of- the-art report of research.

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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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