The Time Window of Language : The Interaction between Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Knowledge in the Temporal Interpretation of German and English Texts.

By: Trautwein, MartinSeries: Language, Context and Cognition SerPublisher: Berlin/Boston : De Gruyter, Inc., 2005Copyright date: ©2005Description: 1 online resource (387 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783110919523Subject(s): Grammar, Comparative and general -- Temporal constructions.;Semantics.;Discourse analysis.;Grammar, Comparative and general -- AspectGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Time Window of Language : The Interaction between Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Knowledge in the Temporal Interpretation of German and English TextsDDC classification: 401.43 LOC classification: P294.5 -- .T73 2005ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- Introduction -- Acknowledgements -- I. Temporality in Language: From Lexical Meaning to Text -- Interpretation -- 1. The Association and Dissociation of Semantic Meaning and (Con)Textual Interpretation -- 2. The Ambiguity of Temporal Information in Texts -- II. Time and Temporal Structure: a Conceptual Analysis -- 1. The Origins of Temporal Structure -- 1.1 General Remarks on Time and Temporal Structure -- 1.2 Natural Situations -- 1.3 The Pragmatic View: Natural Situations as Ontological Commitments -- 2. Temporal Interpretation in Interval Semantics -- 2.1 Evaluation Relative to Intervals of Time -- 2.2 Some Conclusions from Interval Semantics, Concerning Temporal Interpretation and the Sequencing of Situations -- 3. Objections to Interval-Based Theories -- 3.1 Natural Situations as Contexts: From Natural Situations to Possible Propositions -- 3.2 Natural Situations as Truth-makers: From Propositions to Possible Referents -- 4. Establishing Times -- 4.1 Indeterminate Structures in the Domain of Physical Objects: a Parallelism -- 4.2 Consequences for the Informativeness of Sortal Concepts -- 4.3 Establishing Features -- 4.4 The Underspecification of Verbal Semantics -- 5. Summary and Conclusions: Establishing Features, Temporal Relations, and Temporal Sequencing -- III. A Methodological Framework Combining Formal Semantics and Formal Knowledge Representation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Two-Level Semantics -- 3. Knowledge Representation and Natural Language Semantics -- 4. The Five-Level Approach: a Unified Framework for the Representation of Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Knowledge -- 4.1 The Five-Level Approach to Knowledge Representation -- 4.2 A Five-Level Representation of Temporal Interpretation -- 5. Extemalism - Internalism, Pragmatism - Realism: Some Remarks On the Role of Ontology.
IV. Ontological and Epistemological Conditions on Temporal Reference -- 1. Epistemological Presumptions -- 1.1 Epistemology vs. Ontology -- 1.2 Partiality -- 1.3 Heuristics -- 2. A Formal Ontology of Time and Temporal Structure -- 2.1 The Ontologically Basic Assumptions of GOL -- 2.2 Mereology -- 2.3 Chronology -- 3. Ontological and Epistemological Extensions -- 3.1 Partial Structures, Representative Partial Structures, and Establishing Parts and Times -- 3.2 Chronological Relations Applying to Partial Structures and Their Elements -- 4. Partial Temporal Relations: Reasoning with Partial Structures -- 4.1 Approaches to Temporal Reasoning With Incomplete Knowledge -- 4.2 Translating Boundedness and Sequence of Partial Structures into Partial Interval Relations -- 4.3 Definitions and Relation Hierarchies for Partial Temporal Relations -- 5. Conclusions -- V. Information about Establishing Times in Grammar: a Fragment of German Verbal Semantics -- 1. Establishing Features in Grammar: Formal Prerequisites -- 1.1 Syntax, Scope, and Semantic Composition of Aspectuality -- 1.2 Structured Eventive Predications: Which Part of a Sentence Meaning Encodes Establishing Features? -- 1.3 Decomposition -- 1.4 Two Alternative Strategies -- 2. Aspectual Composition (I): Direct Predicate Modifications (‚Attributive Strategy') -- 2.1 The Systematic Problem to Access Predicative Information Compositionally -- 2.2 The Aspectual Quality Predicate Q -- 3. Aspectual Composition (II): Multiple Layers of Eventive Predications (‚Predicative Strategy') -- 3.1 The Problem With Multiple Modifications -- 3.2 Multiple Layers of Eventive Predications -- 3.3 Unique Eventives, Sentence Mood, and Some Aspects of Object Topicalization -- 3.4 An Interpretation of Partial Superposition -- 3.5 Semantic Economy Contra Conceptual Adequacy: Weighing Up Both Strategies.
4. Domains of Aspectual Composition -- 4.1 Aspectual Composition above VP (I): Temporal Modification -- 4.2 Aspectual Composition above VP (II): Sentence Negation -- 4.3 Aspectual Composition below VP: Inner Aspectuality and the Telicity/Atelicity Dichotomy -- 4.4 Aspectual Composition below V°: Productive Derivations of Lexical Adjustments -- 5. Preliminary Conclusions -- VI. Tense, Discourse Structure, and the Sequencing of Eventives -- 1. A Dynamic Interpretation of Tense -- 1.1 The Anaphoric Character of Tense -- 1.2 Reference Times and Chains of Reference Times -- 1.3 Some Conclusions from Partee's Account -- 2. A Dynamic-Semantic Account of the German Tense System -- 2.1 The Dynamic and Compositional Approach of Dynamic Montague Grammar -- 2.2 Time and Sequence: The Two-Part Anaphora of Tense -- 3. Further Anaphoric Temporal Expressions: Adverbs and Conjunctions -- 4. Discourse Relations, the Parameter S, and the Reconstruction of Temporal Sequences -- 5. A Sample Text -- VII. Conclusion -- Appendix to chapter VI: Step-by-Step Composition of the Bäuerlein Text -- References -- Text Sources -- Index of Figures -- Index of Symbols and Abbreviations -- Word Index.
Summary: Human languages are economical systems of knowledge, which usually contribute to the formation and interpretation of utterances only what cannot be supplied by other conceptual systems. Language, Context and Cognition explores conceptual underspecification and context-dependence in grammar and text-production as essential properties of natural languages. This requires close cooperation of linguistics with cognitive science, logic andpragmatics.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Ebrary Ebrary Afghanistan
Available EBKAF-N00018932
Ebrary Ebrary Algeria
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Libya
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Morocco
Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal
Available EBKNP-N00018932
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan

Access a wide range of magazines and books using Pressreader and Ebook central.

Enjoy your reading, British Council Sudan.

Available
Ebrary Ebrary Tunisia
Available
Total holds: 0

Intro -- Introduction -- Acknowledgements -- I. Temporality in Language: From Lexical Meaning to Text -- Interpretation -- 1. The Association and Dissociation of Semantic Meaning and (Con)Textual Interpretation -- 2. The Ambiguity of Temporal Information in Texts -- II. Time and Temporal Structure: a Conceptual Analysis -- 1. The Origins of Temporal Structure -- 1.1 General Remarks on Time and Temporal Structure -- 1.2 Natural Situations -- 1.3 The Pragmatic View: Natural Situations as Ontological Commitments -- 2. Temporal Interpretation in Interval Semantics -- 2.1 Evaluation Relative to Intervals of Time -- 2.2 Some Conclusions from Interval Semantics, Concerning Temporal Interpretation and the Sequencing of Situations -- 3. Objections to Interval-Based Theories -- 3.1 Natural Situations as Contexts: From Natural Situations to Possible Propositions -- 3.2 Natural Situations as Truth-makers: From Propositions to Possible Referents -- 4. Establishing Times -- 4.1 Indeterminate Structures in the Domain of Physical Objects: a Parallelism -- 4.2 Consequences for the Informativeness of Sortal Concepts -- 4.3 Establishing Features -- 4.4 The Underspecification of Verbal Semantics -- 5. Summary and Conclusions: Establishing Features, Temporal Relations, and Temporal Sequencing -- III. A Methodological Framework Combining Formal Semantics and Formal Knowledge Representation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Two-Level Semantics -- 3. Knowledge Representation and Natural Language Semantics -- 4. The Five-Level Approach: a Unified Framework for the Representation of Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Knowledge -- 4.1 The Five-Level Approach to Knowledge Representation -- 4.2 A Five-Level Representation of Temporal Interpretation -- 5. Extemalism - Internalism, Pragmatism - Realism: Some Remarks On the Role of Ontology.

IV. Ontological and Epistemological Conditions on Temporal Reference -- 1. Epistemological Presumptions -- 1.1 Epistemology vs. Ontology -- 1.2 Partiality -- 1.3 Heuristics -- 2. A Formal Ontology of Time and Temporal Structure -- 2.1 The Ontologically Basic Assumptions of GOL -- 2.2 Mereology -- 2.3 Chronology -- 3. Ontological and Epistemological Extensions -- 3.1 Partial Structures, Representative Partial Structures, and Establishing Parts and Times -- 3.2 Chronological Relations Applying to Partial Structures and Their Elements -- 4. Partial Temporal Relations: Reasoning with Partial Structures -- 4.1 Approaches to Temporal Reasoning With Incomplete Knowledge -- 4.2 Translating Boundedness and Sequence of Partial Structures into Partial Interval Relations -- 4.3 Definitions and Relation Hierarchies for Partial Temporal Relations -- 5. Conclusions -- V. Information about Establishing Times in Grammar: a Fragment of German Verbal Semantics -- 1. Establishing Features in Grammar: Formal Prerequisites -- 1.1 Syntax, Scope, and Semantic Composition of Aspectuality -- 1.2 Structured Eventive Predications: Which Part of a Sentence Meaning Encodes Establishing Features? -- 1.3 Decomposition -- 1.4 Two Alternative Strategies -- 2. Aspectual Composition (I): Direct Predicate Modifications (‚Attributive Strategy') -- 2.1 The Systematic Problem to Access Predicative Information Compositionally -- 2.2 The Aspectual Quality Predicate Q -- 3. Aspectual Composition (II): Multiple Layers of Eventive Predications (‚Predicative Strategy') -- 3.1 The Problem With Multiple Modifications -- 3.2 Multiple Layers of Eventive Predications -- 3.3 Unique Eventives, Sentence Mood, and Some Aspects of Object Topicalization -- 3.4 An Interpretation of Partial Superposition -- 3.5 Semantic Economy Contra Conceptual Adequacy: Weighing Up Both Strategies.

4. Domains of Aspectual Composition -- 4.1 Aspectual Composition above VP (I): Temporal Modification -- 4.2 Aspectual Composition above VP (II): Sentence Negation -- 4.3 Aspectual Composition below VP: Inner Aspectuality and the Telicity/Atelicity Dichotomy -- 4.4 Aspectual Composition below V°: Productive Derivations of Lexical Adjustments -- 5. Preliminary Conclusions -- VI. Tense, Discourse Structure, and the Sequencing of Eventives -- 1. A Dynamic Interpretation of Tense -- 1.1 The Anaphoric Character of Tense -- 1.2 Reference Times and Chains of Reference Times -- 1.3 Some Conclusions from Partee's Account -- 2. A Dynamic-Semantic Account of the German Tense System -- 2.1 The Dynamic and Compositional Approach of Dynamic Montague Grammar -- 2.2 Time and Sequence: The Two-Part Anaphora of Tense -- 3. Further Anaphoric Temporal Expressions: Adverbs and Conjunctions -- 4. Discourse Relations, the Parameter S, and the Reconstruction of Temporal Sequences -- 5. A Sample Text -- VII. Conclusion -- Appendix to chapter VI: Step-by-Step Composition of the Bäuerlein Text -- References -- Text Sources -- Index of Figures -- Index of Symbols and Abbreviations -- Word Index.

Human languages are economical systems of knowledge, which usually contribute to the formation and interpretation of utterances only what cannot be supplied by other conceptual systems. Language, Context and Cognition explores conceptual underspecification and context-dependence in grammar and text-production as essential properties of natural languages. This requires close cooperation of linguistics with cognitive science, logic andpragmatics.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.