Energy and Buildings : Efficiency, Air Quality, and Conservation.

By: Utrick, Joseph B
Publisher: New York : Nova Science Publishers, Incorporated, 2009Copyright date: ©2009Description: 1 online resource (471 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781617283994Subject(s): Buildings -- Energy conservation.;Buildings -- Environmental engineeringGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: Print version:: Energy and Buildings : Efficiency, Air Quality, and ConservationDDC classification: 696 LOC classification: TJ163.5.B84 -- E237 2009ebOnline resources: Click to View
Contents:
Intro -- ENERGY AND BUILDINGS: EFFICIENCY,AIR QUALITY AND CONSERVATION -- CONTENTS -- PREFACE -- ON THE NUMERICAL STUDY OF PARTICLEDISPERSION IN INDOOR AIRFLOW:MODELLING CHALLENGES -- ABSTRACT -- INTRODUCTION -- CONSERVATION EQUATIONS -- General Conservation Equations for Gas Phase -- Standard and Re-Normalization Group (RNG) K-ε Model -- RNG-BASED LES MODEL -- PARTICLE PHASE MODEL -- NUMERICAL PROCEDURE -- NUMERICAL PREDICTIONS -- NUMERICAL RESULTS OF THE CONFIGURATION OF ROOM 1 -- NUMERICAL RESULTS OF THE CONFIGURATION OF ROOM 2 -- FURTHER CONSIDERATION OF PARTICLE-WALL COLLISION WITHINBUILDING ENCLOSURE -- Need for Improved Models -- Models for Particle-Wall Collision -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- EVALUATION OF MODELLING TECHNIQUES TOPREDICT INDOOR TEMPERATURE IN INTELLIGENTBUILDINGS: A LITERATURE REVIEW -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. ADVANTAGES OF MODELLING TEMPERATURE IN BUILDINGS -- 3. STATISTICAL MODELS -- 3.1. Autoregressive models -- 3.2. Measures of Accuracy -- 3.3. Lineal Regression Models -- 4. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK MODELS -- 4.1 Basic Structure of an ANN -- 5. PERFORMANCE OF THE MODELS FOR FORECASTING THE INDOORTEMPERATURE IN BUILDINGS -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- METHODOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE ANALYSIS OFTHE ENERGY-PRODUCTIVE BUILDINGS MODULES INTHE HEALTH NETWORK -- ABSTRACT -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. ENERGY - PRODUCTIVE BUILDINGS MODULES (MEEP).DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTEGRATION LEVEL METHODOLOGY. -- 2.1. Determination and Analysis of MEEP Values. First Integration Level. -- 2.2. Development of the Integration Level Methodology. -- A. Second Integration Level: Functional Units. -- B Third Integration Level: Services. -- C. Fourth Integration Level: Areas. -- D. Fifth Integration Level: Health Building. -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES.
DESIGNING ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS:A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH BASED ONCOMPUTER SIMULATION -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- 1. INTRODUCTION / FRAMING /OBJECTIVES -- 2. METHODOLOGY PROPOSED -- 3. APPLICABILITY OF THE PROPOSED METHODOLOGY -- 3.1. The Case Study Model -- 3.2. Base Case Results -- 3.3. Orientation and Location of the Building -- 3.4. Analysis of Different Types of Exterior Walls -- 3.5. Analysis of Different Types of Windows -- 3.6. Analysis of Different Air Infiltration Rates -- 3.7. Analysis of Different Types of Shading -- 3.8. Analysis of Different Types of Roofing -- 3.9. Analysis of Different LTS - "Light To Space" (Internal Lighting SystemGains) -- 3.9. Analysis of Different LTS - "Light To Space" (Internal Lighting SystemGains) -- 3.10. Analysis of Different Air Renewal Rates -- 3.11. Analysis of Different Values of EPD - "Equipment Power Density -- 3.12. Analysis of Different Types of HVAC Systems -- 3.13. Analysis of the Influence of Design Reference Temperatures ("SetPoint" of the Thermostats) -- 3.14. Analysis of the Thermal Comfort of Some Zones of the Building -- 4. A POTENTIAL SOLUTION -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- ARCHITECTURE, THERMAL DESIGN AND ENERGYPERFORMANCE OF SOLAR SCHOOLS IN ARGENTINA -- ABSTRACT -- INTRODUCTION -- School Buildings in the Region -- Basic Concepts of Passive Solar Buildings Design -- SOLAR SCHOOL BUILDINGS -- School in Algarrobo Del Aguila -- Design and Technology -- Monitoring -- Under Normal Conditions of Use (First Week) -- Winter Vacations (Second Week) -- Energy Behaviour and Thermal Comfort -- School in Catriló -- Higrothermal Monitoring -- Thermal Winter Survey -- CONCLUSIONS -- REFERENCES -- THE ROLE OF BUILDINGS ENERGY EFFICIENCY INMITIGATING CARBON EMISSIONS IN CHINA -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- INTRODUCTION -- TREND OF ENERGY DEMAND IN CHINA'S BUILDING SECTOR -- Energy Consumption.
URBANISATION AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION -- Trend -- ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIALS OF ENERGY SAVINGS IN BUILDINGSECTOR -- Employment of Life-Cycle Approach to Assessing Building Energy Efficiency -- Solutions of Intervention in BEE Improvement -- Driving Force of Increase in Energy Demand in Buildings -- Taking Consumption Behaviours and Lifestyle Changes into Account -- CO2 Emission Implication of the Long-Term Increase in Buildings EnergyDemand -- BENCHMARKING THE BEE IN CHINA AND WORLD -- Current Status of Mandatory Codes for BEE -- China's Buildings Regulatory Standards -- Technical Specification in the Tianjin Building Energy Efficiency Standard -- Performance Comparison of BEE Standards -- Parameters of BEE Improvement Portfolios -- GRAPPLING WITH CLIMATE CHANGE RISKS BY OVERCOMINGBARRIERS TO BUILDING EFFICIENCY -- BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTING ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN BUILDINGS -- Technical and Institutional Barriers -- Energy Price Subsidies and Inconsistent Billing and Pricing Systems -- INHERENT PRINCIPAL-AGENT PROBLEM OF BEE -- COST OF EXTERNALITIES -- SCOPE AND SCALE OF KEY AREAS OF INTERVENTIONS IN BUILDINGENERGY EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT -- Tightening Mandatory BEE Regulations and Codes -- Alternative Energy Supply: Promotion of Renewables in District Heating -- Standardisation of Building Materials Efficiency Quality -- Energy Efficiency Labelling and Certificate Scheme -- Information Propagation of Efficient and Low-Carbon Buildings -- Improving End-Use Appliances Efficiency -- Room Air Conditioner (RAC) -- Lighting -- Public Leadership and Cooperative Procurement Programmes -- Rethinking Public Policies for BEE -- Integrated Policy -- Set-Up of Sustainable Consumption Pattern in Buildings -- Incorporating BEE in Climate Policy -- Economic and Market-Based Instruments in Financing BEE -- Fiscal Instruments and Incentives.
Financing BEE Randd and Deployment -- Energy or Carbon Taxes -- Innovative Financing Mechanism in Energy Supply -- Kyoto Financing Mechanism -- Accelerating Pricing Reform -- Fostering Buildings Energy Performance Contracting/ ESCO Support -- SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS -- REFERENCE -- ENERGY USE IN CANADIAN BUILDINGS:WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED FROM RECENT DATA? -- ABSTRACT -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. DATA ON CANADIAN BUILDINGS -- 2.1. Commercial and Institutional Buildings -- 2.2. Residential Buildings -- 2.2.1. Survey of Household Energy Use -- 2.2.2. Energuide for Houses Database -- 3. RECENT CBEEDAC STUDIES ON ENERGY USE INCANADIAN BUILDINGS -- 3.1. Commercial Buildings -- 3.1.1. Physical Building Characteristics and Energy Use -- 3.1.2. Building Activity and Ownership -- 3.2. Residential Buildings -- 3.2.1. Heating -- 3.2.2. Appliances and Home Electronics -- 3.2.3. Lighting -- 3.2.4. EnerGuide for Houses -- 3.2.5. Energy Use in Apartment Buildings -- 4. IMPLICATIONS OF RESULTS FOR POLICIES / INITIATIVES -- CONCLUSION -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENT -- REFERENCES -- BUILDING INTEGRATED RENEWABLE ENERGYTECHNOLOGIES: EMBODIED ENERGY, ECONOMICANALYSIS AND POTENTIAL OF CO2 EMISSIONMITIGATION -- ABSTRACT -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. ENERGY CONSERVATION IN BUILDING -- 2.1. Passive Building Design -- 2.1.1. Passive Solar Design Principles -- 2.1.2. Passive Solar Heating -- 2.1.3. Passive Solar Cooling: -- 2.2. Embodied Energy in Buildings -- 2.3. Building Integrated Renewable Energy Technologies -- i) Flat Plate Thermosyphon Units (FPTU) and Integrated Collector Storage (ICS) -- ii) Solar Collectors with Colored Absorbers -- iii) Solar Collectors with Booster Reflectors -- iv) Unglazed Solar Collectors -- v) Hybrid Photovoltaic/Thermal (PV/T) Systems -- vi) Fresnel Lenses for Building Atria -- vii) Building Integration of Solar/Wind Systems.
3. ECONOMICS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES -- 3.1. Economics of PV System for Building -- 3.2. Economics of Wind Power System for Building -- 3.3. Economics of Solar Hot Water System for Building -- 3.4. Economics of Solar Water Pumping System for Building -- 3.5. Economics of Solar PV Lanterns for Building -- 3.6. Economics of Solar Distillation for Drinking Water Supply in Arid AreaBuildings -- 4. ECONOMICS OF SOLAR LIGHTING AND PASSIVE HEATING /COOLING TECHNIQUES FOR BUILDING -- 4.1. Economics of Daylighting in Buildings -- 4.2. Economics of Retrofitting Trombe Wall for Passive Heating in Buildings: -- Before Retrofit of Building -- After Retrofitting of the Building with Trombe Wall -- 4.3. Economics of Integrating Earth to Air Heat Exchanger (EAHE) forPassive Heating/Cooling of Buildings -- 5. CONCLUSIONS ON BUILDING AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT -- REFERENCES -- REDUCING THE COOLING LOAD BY EVAPORATIVECOOLING OF THE ROOF -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- INTRODUCTION -- LITERATURE SURVEY -- EVAPORATIVE COOLING IN IRAQI WEATHER CONDITIONS -- COOLING THE ROOF -- THE TEST ROOM -- ROOF COMPARTMENT -- WALL INSULATION -- THE COOLING PROCESS -- MEASUREMENT RESULTS -- COOLING LOADS -- USING THE SYSTEM IN OTHER LOCATIONS -- WATER CONSUMPTION -- IN ACTUAL BUILDINGS -- THE THERMAL INFLUENCE OF THE INTERIOR SURFACES -- INCREASING THE EVAPORATIVE COOLERS EFFICIENCY -- OTHER IMPROVEMENTS -- CONCLUSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENT -- REFERENCES -- LIFE CYCLE CONSIDERATIONSIN ENERGY CONSERVATION FORDESIGN OF LOW INCOME HOUSING -- ABSTRACT -- INTRODUCTION -- METHODS -- 1. Whole House Orientation -- 2. House Orientation (Window Evaluation Only) -- 3. Window Placement -- 4. SUPER INSULATED HIGH PERFORMANCE WINDOWS -- 4. SUPER INSULATED HIGH PERFORMANCE WINDOWS -- 5. INSULATED SHADES -- 6. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIGHTING -- 7. R-49 ATTIC Insulation -- 8. Cool Roofing.
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Intro -- ENERGY AND BUILDINGS: EFFICIENCY,AIR QUALITY AND CONSERVATION -- CONTENTS -- PREFACE -- ON THE NUMERICAL STUDY OF PARTICLEDISPERSION IN INDOOR AIRFLOW:MODELLING CHALLENGES -- ABSTRACT -- INTRODUCTION -- CONSERVATION EQUATIONS -- General Conservation Equations for Gas Phase -- Standard and Re-Normalization Group (RNG) K-ε Model -- RNG-BASED LES MODEL -- PARTICLE PHASE MODEL -- NUMERICAL PROCEDURE -- NUMERICAL PREDICTIONS -- NUMERICAL RESULTS OF THE CONFIGURATION OF ROOM 1 -- NUMERICAL RESULTS OF THE CONFIGURATION OF ROOM 2 -- FURTHER CONSIDERATION OF PARTICLE-WALL COLLISION WITHINBUILDING ENCLOSURE -- Need for Improved Models -- Models for Particle-Wall Collision -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- EVALUATION OF MODELLING TECHNIQUES TOPREDICT INDOOR TEMPERATURE IN INTELLIGENTBUILDINGS: A LITERATURE REVIEW -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. ADVANTAGES OF MODELLING TEMPERATURE IN BUILDINGS -- 3. STATISTICAL MODELS -- 3.1. Autoregressive models -- 3.2. Measures of Accuracy -- 3.3. Lineal Regression Models -- 4. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK MODELS -- 4.1 Basic Structure of an ANN -- 5. PERFORMANCE OF THE MODELS FOR FORECASTING THE INDOORTEMPERATURE IN BUILDINGS -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- METHODOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE ANALYSIS OFTHE ENERGY-PRODUCTIVE BUILDINGS MODULES INTHE HEALTH NETWORK -- ABSTRACT -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. ENERGY - PRODUCTIVE BUILDINGS MODULES (MEEP).DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTEGRATION LEVEL METHODOLOGY. -- 2.1. Determination and Analysis of MEEP Values. First Integration Level. -- 2.2. Development of the Integration Level Methodology. -- A. Second Integration Level: Functional Units. -- B Third Integration Level: Services. -- C. Fourth Integration Level: Areas. -- D. Fifth Integration Level: Health Building. -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES.

DESIGNING ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS:A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH BASED ONCOMPUTER SIMULATION -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- 1. INTRODUCTION / FRAMING /OBJECTIVES -- 2. METHODOLOGY PROPOSED -- 3. APPLICABILITY OF THE PROPOSED METHODOLOGY -- 3.1. The Case Study Model -- 3.2. Base Case Results -- 3.3. Orientation and Location of the Building -- 3.4. Analysis of Different Types of Exterior Walls -- 3.5. Analysis of Different Types of Windows -- 3.6. Analysis of Different Air Infiltration Rates -- 3.7. Analysis of Different Types of Shading -- 3.8. Analysis of Different Types of Roofing -- 3.9. Analysis of Different LTS - "Light To Space" (Internal Lighting SystemGains) -- 3.9. Analysis of Different LTS - "Light To Space" (Internal Lighting SystemGains) -- 3.10. Analysis of Different Air Renewal Rates -- 3.11. Analysis of Different Values of EPD - "Equipment Power Density -- 3.12. Analysis of Different Types of HVAC Systems -- 3.13. Analysis of the Influence of Design Reference Temperatures ("SetPoint" of the Thermostats) -- 3.14. Analysis of the Thermal Comfort of Some Zones of the Building -- 4. A POTENTIAL SOLUTION -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- ARCHITECTURE, THERMAL DESIGN AND ENERGYPERFORMANCE OF SOLAR SCHOOLS IN ARGENTINA -- ABSTRACT -- INTRODUCTION -- School Buildings in the Region -- Basic Concepts of Passive Solar Buildings Design -- SOLAR SCHOOL BUILDINGS -- School in Algarrobo Del Aguila -- Design and Technology -- Monitoring -- Under Normal Conditions of Use (First Week) -- Winter Vacations (Second Week) -- Energy Behaviour and Thermal Comfort -- School in Catriló -- Higrothermal Monitoring -- Thermal Winter Survey -- CONCLUSIONS -- REFERENCES -- THE ROLE OF BUILDINGS ENERGY EFFICIENCY INMITIGATING CARBON EMISSIONS IN CHINA -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- INTRODUCTION -- TREND OF ENERGY DEMAND IN CHINA'S BUILDING SECTOR -- Energy Consumption.

URBANISATION AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION -- Trend -- ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIALS OF ENERGY SAVINGS IN BUILDINGSECTOR -- Employment of Life-Cycle Approach to Assessing Building Energy Efficiency -- Solutions of Intervention in BEE Improvement -- Driving Force of Increase in Energy Demand in Buildings -- Taking Consumption Behaviours and Lifestyle Changes into Account -- CO2 Emission Implication of the Long-Term Increase in Buildings EnergyDemand -- BENCHMARKING THE BEE IN CHINA AND WORLD -- Current Status of Mandatory Codes for BEE -- China's Buildings Regulatory Standards -- Technical Specification in the Tianjin Building Energy Efficiency Standard -- Performance Comparison of BEE Standards -- Parameters of BEE Improvement Portfolios -- GRAPPLING WITH CLIMATE CHANGE RISKS BY OVERCOMINGBARRIERS TO BUILDING EFFICIENCY -- BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTING ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN BUILDINGS -- Technical and Institutional Barriers -- Energy Price Subsidies and Inconsistent Billing and Pricing Systems -- INHERENT PRINCIPAL-AGENT PROBLEM OF BEE -- COST OF EXTERNALITIES -- SCOPE AND SCALE OF KEY AREAS OF INTERVENTIONS IN BUILDINGENERGY EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT -- Tightening Mandatory BEE Regulations and Codes -- Alternative Energy Supply: Promotion of Renewables in District Heating -- Standardisation of Building Materials Efficiency Quality -- Energy Efficiency Labelling and Certificate Scheme -- Information Propagation of Efficient and Low-Carbon Buildings -- Improving End-Use Appliances Efficiency -- Room Air Conditioner (RAC) -- Lighting -- Public Leadership and Cooperative Procurement Programmes -- Rethinking Public Policies for BEE -- Integrated Policy -- Set-Up of Sustainable Consumption Pattern in Buildings -- Incorporating BEE in Climate Policy -- Economic and Market-Based Instruments in Financing BEE -- Fiscal Instruments and Incentives.

Financing BEE Randd and Deployment -- Energy or Carbon Taxes -- Innovative Financing Mechanism in Energy Supply -- Kyoto Financing Mechanism -- Accelerating Pricing Reform -- Fostering Buildings Energy Performance Contracting/ ESCO Support -- SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS -- REFERENCE -- ENERGY USE IN CANADIAN BUILDINGS:WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED FROM RECENT DATA? -- ABSTRACT -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. DATA ON CANADIAN BUILDINGS -- 2.1. Commercial and Institutional Buildings -- 2.2. Residential Buildings -- 2.2.1. Survey of Household Energy Use -- 2.2.2. Energuide for Houses Database -- 3. RECENT CBEEDAC STUDIES ON ENERGY USE INCANADIAN BUILDINGS -- 3.1. Commercial Buildings -- 3.1.1. Physical Building Characteristics and Energy Use -- 3.1.2. Building Activity and Ownership -- 3.2. Residential Buildings -- 3.2.1. Heating -- 3.2.2. Appliances and Home Electronics -- 3.2.3. Lighting -- 3.2.4. EnerGuide for Houses -- 3.2.5. Energy Use in Apartment Buildings -- 4. IMPLICATIONS OF RESULTS FOR POLICIES / INITIATIVES -- CONCLUSION -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENT -- REFERENCES -- BUILDING INTEGRATED RENEWABLE ENERGYTECHNOLOGIES: EMBODIED ENERGY, ECONOMICANALYSIS AND POTENTIAL OF CO2 EMISSIONMITIGATION -- ABSTRACT -- 1. INTRODUCTION -- 2. ENERGY CONSERVATION IN BUILDING -- 2.1. Passive Building Design -- 2.1.1. Passive Solar Design Principles -- 2.1.2. Passive Solar Heating -- 2.1.3. Passive Solar Cooling: -- 2.2. Embodied Energy in Buildings -- 2.3. Building Integrated Renewable Energy Technologies -- i) Flat Plate Thermosyphon Units (FPTU) and Integrated Collector Storage (ICS) -- ii) Solar Collectors with Colored Absorbers -- iii) Solar Collectors with Booster Reflectors -- iv) Unglazed Solar Collectors -- v) Hybrid Photovoltaic/Thermal (PV/T) Systems -- vi) Fresnel Lenses for Building Atria -- vii) Building Integration of Solar/Wind Systems.

3. ECONOMICS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES -- 3.1. Economics of PV System for Building -- 3.2. Economics of Wind Power System for Building -- 3.3. Economics of Solar Hot Water System for Building -- 3.4. Economics of Solar Water Pumping System for Building -- 3.5. Economics of Solar PV Lanterns for Building -- 3.6. Economics of Solar Distillation for Drinking Water Supply in Arid AreaBuildings -- 4. ECONOMICS OF SOLAR LIGHTING AND PASSIVE HEATING /COOLING TECHNIQUES FOR BUILDING -- 4.1. Economics of Daylighting in Buildings -- 4.2. Economics of Retrofitting Trombe Wall for Passive Heating in Buildings: -- Before Retrofit of Building -- After Retrofitting of the Building with Trombe Wall -- 4.3. Economics of Integrating Earth to Air Heat Exchanger (EAHE) forPassive Heating/Cooling of Buildings -- 5. CONCLUSIONS ON BUILDING AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT -- REFERENCES -- REDUCING THE COOLING LOAD BY EVAPORATIVECOOLING OF THE ROOF -- ABSTRACT -- Keywords: -- INTRODUCTION -- LITERATURE SURVEY -- EVAPORATIVE COOLING IN IRAQI WEATHER CONDITIONS -- COOLING THE ROOF -- THE TEST ROOM -- ROOF COMPARTMENT -- WALL INSULATION -- THE COOLING PROCESS -- MEASUREMENT RESULTS -- COOLING LOADS -- USING THE SYSTEM IN OTHER LOCATIONS -- WATER CONSUMPTION -- IN ACTUAL BUILDINGS -- THE THERMAL INFLUENCE OF THE INTERIOR SURFACES -- INCREASING THE EVAPORATIVE COOLERS EFFICIENCY -- OTHER IMPROVEMENTS -- CONCLUSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENT -- REFERENCES -- LIFE CYCLE CONSIDERATIONSIN ENERGY CONSERVATION FORDESIGN OF LOW INCOME HOUSING -- ABSTRACT -- INTRODUCTION -- METHODS -- 1. Whole House Orientation -- 2. House Orientation (Window Evaluation Only) -- 3. Window Placement -- 4. SUPER INSULATED HIGH PERFORMANCE WINDOWS -- 4. SUPER INSULATED HIGH PERFORMANCE WINDOWS -- 5. INSULATED SHADES -- 6. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIGHTING -- 7. R-49 ATTIC Insulation -- 8. Cool Roofing.

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