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Morphology and Meaning : Selected Papers from the 15th International Morphology Meeting, Vienna, February 2012.

By: Contributor(s): Series: Current Issues in Linguistic TheoryPublisher: Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (358 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9789027270931
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Morphology and Meaning : Selected Papers from the 15th International Morphology Meeting, Vienna, February 2012DDC classification:
  • 415/.9
LOC classification:
  • P241 -- .I58 2014eb
Online resources:
Contents:
MORPHOLOGY AND MEANING -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- To the memory of Dieter Kastovsky -- Table of contents -- Editors' introduction -- Morphology and meaning -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Some fundamental issues -- 2.1 The nature of (morphological) meaning -- 2.2 The functions of morphology -- 3. Compositionality -- 3.1 Semantic transparency and lexicalization -- 3.2 Semantic interpretation: bottom-up or top-down? -- 3.3 The fit between meaning and form -- 4. Polysemy -- 4.1 The abstractness of morphological meaning -- 4.2 Recurrent polysemic constellations in word formation -- 4.3 Synonymy avoidance -- 4.4 Compound interpretation -- 5. Semantic restrictions on morphological patterns -- 6. Semantic change -- 6.1 Grammaticalization -- 6.2 Semantic change in affixes -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Plenary papers -- Roots, concepts, and word structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word meaning and word structure -- 2.1 Structuring word meaning -- 2.2 The locus of idiosyncratic non-grammatical meaning -- 2.3 Conceptions of roots -- 3. Morphological roots do not encapsulate core lexical meaning -- 3.1 No common semantic denominator between corradical lexemes -- 3.2 Semantic relatedness without a shared concept -- 3.3 Roots underdetermine lexical properties -- 4. Syntactic vs. morphological roots -- 5. Complex words, simplex concepts -- 5.1 Word structure and concept structure -- 5.2 Conceptual atomism and the grammatical decomposition of lexical meaning -- 6. Nouns and concepts -- 6.1 The conceptual bases of nominality -- 6.2 Constraining nominal semantic space -- 7. Concepts, morphemes and syntactic structure -- 7.1 Noun-specific features and the structure of DP -- 7.2 Individuation -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Between word formation and meaning change -- 1. Word formation and semantic change.
1.1 In between word formation and meaning change -- 1.2 Semantic lexical change: Change of designation, meaning change, and word formation -- 2. Lexical change and constructions -- 2.1 Construction Grammar -- 2.2 Links between constructions -- 3. Word formation and meaning change within lexical-constructional change: An overview -- 4. Word formation and meaning change: An output-oriented constructional systematics -- 4.1 Output: Type Input-output -- 4.2 Output: Type Input WF (ellipsis) -- 4.3 Output: Type Intertwining (folk-etymology) -- 4.4 Output: Anything goes -- 5. Word formation and meaning change: A device-oriented constructional systematics -- 5.1 DEVICE: Type Input WF-output WF -- 5.2 DEVICE: Type Output WF -- 5.3 DEVICE: Type Anything goes -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Indirect coding -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Coding -- 1.2 Direct and indirect coding -- 2. Paradigmatically mediated coding -- 2.1 Beneficiary and possessor -- 2.2 From paradigmatically mediated to direct coding -- 3. Syntagmatically mediated coding -- 3.1 Constraints -- 3.2 Grammaticalization of a reinforcement: French negation -- 3.3 Morphologization of a phonological alternation: German plural marking -- 3.4 Morphologization of allomorphy: Yucatec Maya verb morphology -- 3.5 From syntagmatically mediated to direct coding -- 3.6 From direct to syntagmatically mediated coding: Yucatec pronominal clitics -- 4. Paradigmatically and syntagmatically mediated coding -- 5. Application to linguistic description -- 5.1 Interlinear glosses -- 5.2 Morphological description -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Section papers -- Diachrony and the polysemy of derivational affixes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Polysemy in derivation -- 2.1 Ewe vi' "child" > -ví "diminutive" -- 2.2 Mandarin -bā "bar" > "location" -- 3. The constructionist approach to polysemy in derivation.
4. How does polysemy arise? -- 4.1 Approximation in word formation -- 4.2 Meaning generalisation -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Possessive compounds in Slavic and the Principle of Integrated Meronymy -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Parasynthetic and synthetic constructions -- 3. Recent accounts -- 3.1 Booij's analysis -- 3.2 Bisetto & Melloni's analysis -- 4. Semantic constraints of the non-suffixed type -- 4.1 Problems with inalienable possession -- 4.2 Part-whole relations: Meronymy as a basic semantic principle -- 4.3 The Principle of Integrated Meronymy -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Relation diversity and ease of processing for opaque and transparent English compounds -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The current research -- 2.1 Obtaining a measure of ease of processing -- 2.2 Obtaining a measure of relation diversity -- 2.3 Obtaining a measure of frequency -- 2.4 Data analysis -- 3. Discussion -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Inflection vs. derivation -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 The Mordvin languages -- 1.2 The present study -- 2. The etymology of the Mordvin abessive -- 3. The abessive in the case paradigms -- 4. The syntactic functions of the abessive forms -- 5. The abessive and the secondary declension -- 6. Comparison with other case forms -- 7. Inflection vs. derivation -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- Discrepancy between form and meaning in word-formation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Morphological discrepancies between meaning and form -- 2.1 Form-meaning discrepancy from the point of view of derivations -- 2.2 Form-meaning discrepancy at the lexicon level -- 3. Derivation and lexicon: Two independent levels for the description of morphological discrepancy -- 3.1 Derivational deviations -- 3.2 Lexical deviations -- 4. A unified analysis of deviation -- 4.1 Constraints at the WF level -- 4.2 The point of view of speaker-hearer interaction.
5. Conclusion -- References -- Compounds vs. phrases -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Grammatical, semantic, and pragmatic properties of compounds and phrases -- 2.1 Morpho-syntactic and phonological properties -- 2.2 Semantic-pragmatic aspects -- 3. Investigations into cognitive differences between compounds and phrases -- 3.1 Experiment 1: Memorization study -- 3.2 Experiment 2: Questionnaire study -- 3.3 Experiment 3: Self-paced reading study -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Semantic transparency, compounding, and the nature of independent variables -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A psychocentric approach -- 2.1 Psychocentricity and morphological transcendence: The case of helicopter -- 3. Semantic opacity -- 4. The core stimuli -- 5. The P3 technique -- 6. The experiments -- 6.1 Methods -- 6.2 Results -- 7. Discussion -- References -- The layering of form and meaning in creole word-formation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The morphological status of full reduplication -- 2.1 Phonological evidence: Word-level stress -- 2.2 Semantic evidence: Iconicity -- 2.3 Summary -- 3. Full reduplication in interaction with morphology -- 3.1 Conversion -- 3.2 Inflection -- 3.3 Derivation -- 3.4 Derivation and inflection -- 3.5 Summary -- 4. A morphological approach to Kriyol -- 4.1 Full reduplication and morphological theory -- 4.2 Construction Morphology -- 4.3 An informal analysis of full reduplication -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Semantic headedness and categorization of -cum- compounds -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Research methodology and corpora -- 3. Coordinative compounds and -cum- compounds -- 4. Referentiality -- 5. Headedness and semantic relations of constituents -- 6. Semantic categorization -- 6.1 People's professional or leisure activities -- 6.2 Buildings, rooms, and other places -- 6.3 Literary/journalistic/music/film/television genres.
6.4 Machines, pieces of furniture, clothes, and other objects -- 6.5 Abstract nouns -- 6.6 Toponyms and anthroponyms -- 7. Adjectives -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- German plural doublets with and without meaning differentiation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. German plural doublets and the delimitation of overabundance -- 3. Plural variants with pragmatic meaning difference -- 4. Plural variants with semantic meaning difference -- 5. Origins of plural variants -- 6. Iconicity preferences between meaning and form -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- On the form and meaning of double noun incorporation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What counts as double NI? -- 2.1 Abnormal speech types -- 2.2 Incorporation of N-N compounds -- 2.3 Double NICs where one IN is an applied object -- 3. More about NI: the alternations -- 3.1 The directionality alternation -- 3.2 The adjacency alternation -- 3.3 The transitivity alternation -- 4. Theoretical framework -- 4.1 Preliminary assumptions -- 4.2 The core proposal -- 5. Languages with double NI -- 5.1 Languages with M-phase mismatch -- 5.2 Double NICs with no M-phase mismatch -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Tuning morphosemantic transparency by shortening -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Loss of transparency through shortening - a necessary evil? -- 1.2 Shortening as a tool for tuning morphosemantic transparency -- 1.3 Material and method of the study -- 2. Shortening techniques -- 3. Shortening in German -- 4. Shortening in Farsi -- 5. Shortening in Chinese -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Sources of the corpus -- Root transparency and the morphology-meaning interface -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background to the study -- 2.1 Derivational morphology in English -- 2.2 Derivational morphology in Hebrew -- 2.3 Hebrew derived nouns -- 3. The study -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Materials -- 4. Results and discussion.
5. Conclusions.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
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Ebrary Ebrary Algeria Available
Ebrary Ebrary Cyprus Available
Ebrary Ebrary Egypt Available
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Ebrary Ebrary Morocco Available
Ebrary Ebrary Nepal Available EBKNP-N00013381
Ebrary Ebrary Sudan Available
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Total holds: 0

MORPHOLOGY AND MEANING -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- To the memory of Dieter Kastovsky -- Table of contents -- Editors' introduction -- Morphology and meaning -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Some fundamental issues -- 2.1 The nature of (morphological) meaning -- 2.2 The functions of morphology -- 3. Compositionality -- 3.1 Semantic transparency and lexicalization -- 3.2 Semantic interpretation: bottom-up or top-down? -- 3.3 The fit between meaning and form -- 4. Polysemy -- 4.1 The abstractness of morphological meaning -- 4.2 Recurrent polysemic constellations in word formation -- 4.3 Synonymy avoidance -- 4.4 Compound interpretation -- 5. Semantic restrictions on morphological patterns -- 6. Semantic change -- 6.1 Grammaticalization -- 6.2 Semantic change in affixes -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Plenary papers -- Roots, concepts, and word structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Word meaning and word structure -- 2.1 Structuring word meaning -- 2.2 The locus of idiosyncratic non-grammatical meaning -- 2.3 Conceptions of roots -- 3. Morphological roots do not encapsulate core lexical meaning -- 3.1 No common semantic denominator between corradical lexemes -- 3.2 Semantic relatedness without a shared concept -- 3.3 Roots underdetermine lexical properties -- 4. Syntactic vs. morphological roots -- 5. Complex words, simplex concepts -- 5.1 Word structure and concept structure -- 5.2 Conceptual atomism and the grammatical decomposition of lexical meaning -- 6. Nouns and concepts -- 6.1 The conceptual bases of nominality -- 6.2 Constraining nominal semantic space -- 7. Concepts, morphemes and syntactic structure -- 7.1 Noun-specific features and the structure of DP -- 7.2 Individuation -- 8. Conclusion -- References -- Between word formation and meaning change -- 1. Word formation and semantic change.

1.1 In between word formation and meaning change -- 1.2 Semantic lexical change: Change of designation, meaning change, and word formation -- 2. Lexical change and constructions -- 2.1 Construction Grammar -- 2.2 Links between constructions -- 3. Word formation and meaning change within lexical-constructional change: An overview -- 4. Word formation and meaning change: An output-oriented constructional systematics -- 4.1 Output: Type Input-output -- 4.2 Output: Type Input WF (ellipsis) -- 4.3 Output: Type Intertwining (folk-etymology) -- 4.4 Output: Anything goes -- 5. Word formation and meaning change: A device-oriented constructional systematics -- 5.1 DEVICE: Type Input WF-output WF -- 5.2 DEVICE: Type Output WF -- 5.3 DEVICE: Type Anything goes -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Indirect coding -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Coding -- 1.2 Direct and indirect coding -- 2. Paradigmatically mediated coding -- 2.1 Beneficiary and possessor -- 2.2 From paradigmatically mediated to direct coding -- 3. Syntagmatically mediated coding -- 3.1 Constraints -- 3.2 Grammaticalization of a reinforcement: French negation -- 3.3 Morphologization of a phonological alternation: German plural marking -- 3.4 Morphologization of allomorphy: Yucatec Maya verb morphology -- 3.5 From syntagmatically mediated to direct coding -- 3.6 From direct to syntagmatically mediated coding: Yucatec pronominal clitics -- 4. Paradigmatically and syntagmatically mediated coding -- 5. Application to linguistic description -- 5.1 Interlinear glosses -- 5.2 Morphological description -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Section papers -- Diachrony and the polysemy of derivational affixes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Polysemy in derivation -- 2.1 Ewe vi' "child" > -ví "diminutive" -- 2.2 Mandarin -bā "bar" > "location" -- 3. The constructionist approach to polysemy in derivation.

4. How does polysemy arise? -- 4.1 Approximation in word formation -- 4.2 Meaning generalisation -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Possessive compounds in Slavic and the Principle of Integrated Meronymy -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Parasynthetic and synthetic constructions -- 3. Recent accounts -- 3.1 Booij's analysis -- 3.2 Bisetto & Melloni's analysis -- 4. Semantic constraints of the non-suffixed type -- 4.1 Problems with inalienable possession -- 4.2 Part-whole relations: Meronymy as a basic semantic principle -- 4.3 The Principle of Integrated Meronymy -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Relation diversity and ease of processing for opaque and transparent English compounds -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The current research -- 2.1 Obtaining a measure of ease of processing -- 2.2 Obtaining a measure of relation diversity -- 2.3 Obtaining a measure of frequency -- 2.4 Data analysis -- 3. Discussion -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Inflection vs. derivation -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 The Mordvin languages -- 1.2 The present study -- 2. The etymology of the Mordvin abessive -- 3. The abessive in the case paradigms -- 4. The syntactic functions of the abessive forms -- 5. The abessive and the secondary declension -- 6. Comparison with other case forms -- 7. Inflection vs. derivation -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- Discrepancy between form and meaning in word-formation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Morphological discrepancies between meaning and form -- 2.1 Form-meaning discrepancy from the point of view of derivations -- 2.2 Form-meaning discrepancy at the lexicon level -- 3. Derivation and lexicon: Two independent levels for the description of morphological discrepancy -- 3.1 Derivational deviations -- 3.2 Lexical deviations -- 4. A unified analysis of deviation -- 4.1 Constraints at the WF level -- 4.2 The point of view of speaker-hearer interaction.

5. Conclusion -- References -- Compounds vs. phrases -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Grammatical, semantic, and pragmatic properties of compounds and phrases -- 2.1 Morpho-syntactic and phonological properties -- 2.2 Semantic-pragmatic aspects -- 3. Investigations into cognitive differences between compounds and phrases -- 3.1 Experiment 1: Memorization study -- 3.2 Experiment 2: Questionnaire study -- 3.3 Experiment 3: Self-paced reading study -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Semantic transparency, compounding, and the nature of independent variables -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A psychocentric approach -- 2.1 Psychocentricity and morphological transcendence: The case of helicopter -- 3. Semantic opacity -- 4. The core stimuli -- 5. The P3 technique -- 6. The experiments -- 6.1 Methods -- 6.2 Results -- 7. Discussion -- References -- The layering of form and meaning in creole word-formation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The morphological status of full reduplication -- 2.1 Phonological evidence: Word-level stress -- 2.2 Semantic evidence: Iconicity -- 2.3 Summary -- 3. Full reduplication in interaction with morphology -- 3.1 Conversion -- 3.2 Inflection -- 3.3 Derivation -- 3.4 Derivation and inflection -- 3.5 Summary -- 4. A morphological approach to Kriyol -- 4.1 Full reduplication and morphological theory -- 4.2 Construction Morphology -- 4.3 An informal analysis of full reduplication -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Semantic headedness and categorization of -cum- compounds -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Research methodology and corpora -- 3. Coordinative compounds and -cum- compounds -- 4. Referentiality -- 5. Headedness and semantic relations of constituents -- 6. Semantic categorization -- 6.1 People's professional or leisure activities -- 6.2 Buildings, rooms, and other places -- 6.3 Literary/journalistic/music/film/television genres.

6.4 Machines, pieces of furniture, clothes, and other objects -- 6.5 Abstract nouns -- 6.6 Toponyms and anthroponyms -- 7. Adjectives -- 8. Conclusions -- References -- German plural doublets with and without meaning differentiation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. German plural doublets and the delimitation of overabundance -- 3. Plural variants with pragmatic meaning difference -- 4. Plural variants with semantic meaning difference -- 5. Origins of plural variants -- 6. Iconicity preferences between meaning and form -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- On the form and meaning of double noun incorporation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What counts as double NI? -- 2.1 Abnormal speech types -- 2.2 Incorporation of N-N compounds -- 2.3 Double NICs where one IN is an applied object -- 3. More about NI: the alternations -- 3.1 The directionality alternation -- 3.2 The adjacency alternation -- 3.3 The transitivity alternation -- 4. Theoretical framework -- 4.1 Preliminary assumptions -- 4.2 The core proposal -- 5. Languages with double NI -- 5.1 Languages with M-phase mismatch -- 5.2 Double NICs with no M-phase mismatch -- 6. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Tuning morphosemantic transparency by shortening -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Loss of transparency through shortening - a necessary evil? -- 1.2 Shortening as a tool for tuning morphosemantic transparency -- 1.3 Material and method of the study -- 2. Shortening techniques -- 3. Shortening in German -- 4. Shortening in Farsi -- 5. Shortening in Chinese -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Sources of the corpus -- Root transparency and the morphology-meaning interface -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background to the study -- 2.1 Derivational morphology in English -- 2.2 Derivational morphology in Hebrew -- 2.3 Hebrew derived nouns -- 3. The study -- 3.1 Participants -- 3.2 Materials -- 4. Results and discussion.

5. Conclusions.

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